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AMERICAN 



WNUROQKDlHil 



BY 



A CLODHOPPER 



OF 



NORTH CAROLINA, 



PHILADELPHIA { 
PRINTED FOR THIS AUTHOR, 

1825, 






at 



THE 



AEmWAW ffl lkSg(S©2P I. 



IT is now about fifteen years since the Mission- 
ary cause was introduced into North Carolina, with 
great show of zeal, and love for the poor Indians on 
our continent. Their deplorable condition was de- 
picted in the most lively colours, and with all that 
sympathy and apparent feeling for their poor lost 
souls, calculated to soften a heart of stone, and 
awaken in the coldest-hearted christian, the most 
earnest emotions for their salvation. But there was 
something then, and ever has been, that I dreaded 
as a viper full of deadly poison. Although it was 
glossed over with the love of souls ; the worth of 
v snuls; starving souls for want of knowledge, &C.&C. 
with all the embellishments of fine language, and 
great talents in teaching; added to which, were 
many tears, much show of feeling, and semblance of 
christian sincerity ; yet I could not help being filled 
with a jealousy, that there was .death in the pot. — 
And I have stood as an opposer and observer ever 
since, and now offer the public a few thoughts, and 
hazard some conjectures, on the future consequences 
of the Missionary and other societies, abounding in 
our land of freedom. 

In the first place, several associated bodies pro- 
ceeded to appoint delegates ; say, four or five from 
each of their respective bodies, to form a convention 
or Missionary board, to lay a plan for the conversion 
of the heathen; (for no man could be found among 
all the seeming feeling ones for poor Indian souls, 
that would comply with the command of Christ : to 
take neither gold, nor silver, nor scrip ; neither two 
coats ; and go into all the world and preach the gos- 



pal to every creature, without money or price.}— 
These delegated divines, therefore, met together at 
« , to hold the mighty council, to form the benevo- 
lent plan of converting the Indians, quickly. And 
what is the result of their deliberations on so impor- 
tant a subject? Why, money! money! Let the 
people give us of their money ,fahd the mighty work 
j^an be done. What ? men do toe work with money,' 
| which none but God can do by his grace and spirit! 
Folly indeed — but the plan was drawn, and this is 
as near the spirit and principle of it, as I am able to 
describe — 

First: We must take all possible care to make the 
ease of the Indians as bad as we can. Secondly: 
We must show with great zeal, how much our hearts 
feel, by affectation only, since we are not willing to 
go ourselves ; and if need should so require to get a 
little more money, we must shed some tears before 
our congregations. Thirdltj : Our Missionary texts 
must be well chosen and pathetically handled, to ex- 
' cite the sympathy of our hearers, and open their 
hearts to the Indians; and then while they are in 
that soft state, let a collection be made, and we shall 
draw plentifully from their pockets. Fourthly : Let 
tarioiTS-'soeieties be formed, to take in members at 
one or two dollars a year, for membership ; and 
have so much at one time to constitute one a member 
or a director for life, and this will greatly contribute 
to our getting money. Fifthly : Let us create titles, 
.such as presidents, vice-presidents, corresponding 
secretaries, and treasurers, in these new societies, 
with boards of directors, and other unheard of titles 
of honour in the New Testament ; and this will be 
a good bait; since men delight to be honoured, and 
have their names carried abroad, and no doubt cause 
many to do much in aiding our schemes of getting 
money. Sixthly : Let travelling beggars be appoint- 
ed, crying wherever they go — give I give us of 
your money to convert the heathen. How unlike the 
prophets, John the Baptist, Jesus Christ, the apos : 



ties, a Luther, a George Whitfield, a Wesley, a 
Dow, and a thousand others, who are ornaments to 
the free gospel of Christ ; all impressed with the 
worth of souls ; and who go forth taking up their 
cross, denying themselves, and devoting themselves 
to the work of God, for the good of men : dependant 
on God, without hegging or being shamefully backed 
by monied societies. 

By hard squeezing, somewhere about seven hun- 
dred and fifty dollars was collected, and deposited 
with Mr. Treasurer, until further orders from this 
board of wise divines, and set of new schemers in 
gospel theory. They met, and met again, from year 
to year, to re-organize their plan of money getting. 
Some years after, out comes a shameful Circular 
from this wise board, (when they had found out they 
were but men,) that if Cray man that had given, 
wanted his money back, he could have it, by apply- 
ing; but that they were persuaded better things of 
of them that had given ; (a proof of their vanity and 
folly ; for they now plead the hostility of the In- 
dians, and want of proper persons to teach school, 
&c. &c.) Soon the great and mighty institutions of 
foreign and domestic missions, with bible societies 
and theological seminaries, were circulated, with 
all the high encomiums that the. English language 
could furnish ; and into them, they and their per- 
verted funds began to fall. Now, in this mighty 
field to do wonders, in sending the gospel to the 
destitute at home and abroad, to work this wise 
board of directors go, with redoubled ardour, setting 
the wisdom of all their heads to work, to invent new 
plans of getting more money — and how they may, 
by the by, handle a little of the precious stuff them- 
selves, I shall here notice, as the people seem to 
bleed pretty freely. 

And so, Seventhly : While in council they make a 
bargain, you comb my head f and I will scratch your 
back ; — you confer on me the honourable title of gos- 
pel beggar or missionary hireling, at one dollar and 



6 

twenty-five cents per day, or forty dollars per 
month, if you think I have a good talent for begging; 
or I will beg for you, if you will pay me for my ser- 
vices ; or I will play into your hands, if you will 
play into mine — share the profits. Cheat and fleece 
the people out of their hard earnings, upon condi- 
tion you will let me beg in the name of your honour- 
able society ; for I am ashamed to beg for myself, 
lest the people raise the hue and cry — money hunter, 
he. 

What abominable hypocrisy ! If the cause es- 
poused be holy, just, virtuous and honourable, why 
not come openly out to the world, and tell the con- 
gregations that you have been hired by the board 
of domestic or foreign missions, for one dollar and 
twenty five cents per day, to beg for them ; and that 
the beggar and the board are to divide the money, 
and all over wages is to be saved for other hirelings, 
doctors, and reverends ; then congregations would 
know how to act, and such characters act more 
worthy the Christian minister and honest man. 

Eighthly: The sound destitute, destitute, desti- 
tute places of the gospel, must re-echo in all our 
churches, to work upon our hearers to get more mo- 
ney in our exhausting coffers, and keep our fingers 
greased; for who can go without a fine coat and 
plenty of money ! And where have domestic mis- 
sionaries gone ? Have they gone to the most desti- 
tute parts of North Carolina, and other places? 
No. Believe me — these hirelings like to be fed on 
better fare than the poor can give them — they like 
the houses of colonels, squires, and to have very 
rich and fat tables and stables, where their horses 
will be well provided for; and to ride good roads : 
in short, the main point is to go about towns, and 
to the richest churches and neighbourhoods, where 
the most money is to be begged -.—and their conduct 
proves it, with all their pretence of the love of souls. 
J wish, indeed, that money may not make the 
preacher go, as well as the mure. 



These beggars keep a mighty cry about the des- 
titute. Why not go to them, if their hearts are so af- 
fected about their condition, and then we shall have 
cause to say, souls, and not money, is their object 
But they tell us, money is wanting ; and when they 
have begged enough, then they are going to send 
preachers to the destitute. How much will be 
enough ? They have had*their thousands, and I do 
not yet see that the destitute places in North Caro- 
lina are a whit the better supplied; and I doubt 
whether they would be, if the benevolent public 
were to give thousands more. The beggars, in all 
probability, would still get the greatest part, for 
riding where they could sell, what they call gospel, 
to the highest bidder, and find the most money. — > 
The conduct of some, in several instances, has pro- 
ved the fact, that money was the main object. For 
as soon as they had got that, they have bid th« 
churches farewell, and gone to see where they could 
find more. 

But who are they going to send, when they get 
money enough ? Why, say they, " men of God." * 
That is a mistake ; God's ministers are not hire- 
lings; they do not divine for money, like Balaam, 
nor run up and down the country, hired, this way 
and that way, as the current of gain shifts. Nor 
are they anxious, like Judas, to have the bag, and 
receive their thirty pieces of silver. In this text, 
we see the character of a minister of God : " Feed 
the flock of God, over which the Holy Ghost has 
made you overseers ; taking the oversight thereof 
willingly, and of a ready mind, and not for filthy 
lucre's sake." But if they send ministers at all to 
the destitute, they will send hirelings, Judases or 
Balaam's. For if they will not go for the love of 
God and the good of souls, but you must give them 
money to make them move, 1 contend, that money is 
the main-spring of action — the great wheel that gives V 
motion to their going. The sake, is filthy lucre or 9 
money, since no sake could move them but money 



8 

sake. Furnish money, and what crowds are moving 
in every direction, hunting money, fortunes, and 
places of profit. Stop the money, and you would see 
a squandering among these Judases at once. But, 
you would see God's ministers, like regular stars, 
moving each one in his own sphere, with his work 
before him, feeding the flock with life, enduring po- 
verty and every thing else, if need be, for the cause 
of God, and the souls of men. — In a word, like the 
prophets and apostles, stemming every opposition ; 
and counting every thing but loss, so that they can 
win souls to Christ. 

The true ministers of Christ are always more 
ready to give, than receive. But the men sent out 
by missionary boards, in this day, will be only a 
curse, instead of a blessing, to God's Israel. Their 
discourses, generally, are without life or substance, 
and are a burthen to the godly. • And they squint 
an eve fo a purse, with as much intenseness as ever 
Evedid at the forbidden fruit. 

Some great writer has said, this is an age of won- 
ders ; and I begin to think it is so indeed ; for toe 
idea I used to entertain of beggars, was, that they 
were poor, decripped, ragged, helpless beings, des- 
titute of the means of supporting themselves. But 
how wonderfully times have changed ; for now we 
see hearty, hale men, and young men in the prime 
and vigour of life, clothed in the finest black and 
blue broad cloth, with fur hats, boots, spurs, silk 
jackets, silver tipped bridles and stirrups, watches, 
&c. &c. turned beggars — great beggars. They tell 
us, they beg for the sake of Christ and the heathen ; 
but fortunately for us all, these fellows cannot keep 
the Cat in the wallet ; for one of these northern beg- 
gars, not long since, passed through-North Carolina, 
and being asked how much he had collected, he said 
about two thousand dollars. And pray, sir, said the 
inquirer, what per centum do they give you for beg- 
ging? He said his fees would come to about four 
hundred dollars. And pray, sir, are you a preacher 



9 

too : said the inquirer, looking gravely In his face? 
yes ! said he, I attempt to preach as I go— hang- 
ing down his head, and throwing his fine broad 
cloth legs over each other, and twisting his watch 
key. Yes, and I think, said the man, a great many 
of you had better be at work, than going about in 
the garb of a preacher, as you pretend, begging the 
poor labourers for their money ; for you look more 
like a doctor, or a young lawyer, with your frizzled 
foretop and fine clothing, than a preacher. And, I 
suppose, the North Carolinians might have went to 
hell for your preaching, if it had not been for the 
four hundred dollars you expected to get. No, he 
replied, I don't know that I should have come, but 
the society hired me to come, and I must live some 
how; and you'll give something, will you not? No, 
that I wont, said the man. If I have got any thing 
to give, I will give it to our old preacher, who will 
preach whether we pay him or not ; and not to such # 
fellows as you, who are riding about dressed up in 
your fine broad cloth, hunting a rich wife, and beg* 
ging money; while I must wear my old tow trowscrs, 
and work in the hot sun to maintain such fellows, 
No, that I wont, repeated the man. O yes ! but 
you cai>, I know, and will give me something, con^ 
tinued the beggar. I will not, was the reply. 

These beggars are like hungry mosquetoes—^ 
knock them off, and they will at you again, and 
again, until they suck your money, if possible. Say, 
and prove, if any man can, that there is one trait of 
true apostolic character in these fellows, and the 
controversy will be at an end. Their love of money 
has betrayed them, as it did Simon Magus. Sent out 
by missionary boards, and not by Jesus Christ, they 
look for profit by fleecing the people ; lugging the 
cause of God, and the care of the heathen in, to aid 
them in getting money. 

Another deep-laid scheme to get money, is, to 
draw up the most afFerting and sympathetic ad- 
dresses, to publish in their circulating reports, isi 



10 

which the very bowels of antiquity are often ran* 
sacked, to get something that may touch the feelings 
of the community ; for no other purpose; but to get 
their money. A combination of the best talents are 
employed to form one of these Circulars, which, at 
best, to say no worse of them, are nothing but money- 
speculations, human contrivances, and pompous ex- 
pressions, to deceive the hearts of the simple, and 
live on their spoil. 

Some thousands have been sent to India, to sup- 
port the lovers of money there, and turn that land 
of heathenism into a Paradise of saints. And what 
has been done there ? What mighty works have been 
wrought by all the hundred of thousands of dollars 
that have been, expenxled, and all the numerous mis- 
sionaries that have been sent, from this and other 
countries ! I have heard, as with the trumpet's 
fame, that about three hundred persons have been, 
at last, persuaded to renounce cast and turn Chris- 
tian, after fifteen or twenty years' labour ; when a 
single Peter, a Paul, a Luther, a Whitfield, a Wes- 
ley, and others, being sent of God, have done more 
in a few days or weeks, without the aid of self- 
created societies, and monied institutions, and nume- 
rous beggars not sanctioned by the word*of God, 
nor found in the pages of the New Testament. As 
the churches in this country are now going on, they 
will soon be no better than the church of Rome, and 
the High Church of England; for money and titles 
have always been the object of Popes and Popish 
priests, and also of the clergy of the Church of 
England, who once had the command of sixteen 
thousand weight of tobacco, annually, in this coun- 
try, to turn into money. Titles and money have 
always corrupted the ministry, and they have al- 
ready began to disgrace it in North Carolina. The 
same causes will always produce like effects; and 
let the true children of God wjatch and beware. 

But to quiet our fears, and make us tamely ac- 
quiesce, while the « reverend" clergy cut the strings 



• 



11 

of our purses, and put the yoke of tyranny snug on 
our necks, they tell us the mind of God is with his 
people. If they were to tell me the mind of the 
de\ii was with many in this day, who profess to be 
his sen ants, f could readily believe it. Can the 
mind of God be, where the whole soul is engaged 
in schemes to get money !! Look and see, if you 
find such a spirit with the prophets, John the Bap- 
tist, and the apostles. No, indeed ! But be still, p 
say they; this is the way God is about to usher in 
the glorious millennium. Rather, I say, it is the way 
that the devil will soon triumph over all true reli- 
gion, and aggrandize his transformed ministers, 
and make th< m pensioners of slate. Money and edu- 
cation are power ; and in the management of skillful t 
hands, great effects may, in a short time,, be pro- 
duced. 

Can one instance be shown, from the first of Ge- 
nesis to the last of the Revelation, where God has • 
ever made money a means of spreading his religion ? 
Has it not beendone by humble and unaustentatious 
persons, specially chose» s Of" Gcd, without any call 
for money ? Look at a Jonah, Peter, Paul, and Bar- 
nabas, all sent on special missions. We hear no- 
thing of money or backing societies, before they can 
go : but now thousands must be had on hand, and 
good promises for more of the precious stuff, before 
our missionaries can move a peg. And T leave the 
reader to judge, what side such missionaries belong 
to. 

But it seems that the mind of God is not always 
with his people, much less, with those that call them- 
selves his people, but are in reality the devil's peo- 
ple ; or if the devil does not personally preside in the 
chair as president, yet he votes in the voters, and 
that is as good, and much better; because, he acts 
in 'he back ground, unsuspected ; and you shall see 
who turns the wheel. 

Was the mind of God with the great Baptist As- 
sociation of Virginia, when they created Samuel 



Harris Apostle of Virginia 1 Did not the devil turn 
the wheel there ? We laugh at the folly now, of that 
set of wise ministers ; and so will posterity, in years 
to come, -at all the unscriptural works of darkness 
now going on, where the devil turns the wheel. 
And who can help thinking the devil turns the 
wheel, where money is hut too plainly seen to be 
the object of each and every movement. 

Was the mind of God with his church and people 
of Israel, at the. foot of Mount Horeb, when the peo- 
ple said to that great saint, Aaron : « Come make 
us gods to go before us into Egypt ; for as for this 
Moses, we wist not what has become of him :'* — and 
gave him their gold, jewels and bracelets, of which 
he made the idol calf; and kicked up such a mighty 
dust, dancing around the god of their own making. 

Was the mind of God with his people, when Jero- 
boam made the two golden calves, and set one in 
Dan and the other in Bethel, and said, " these arc 
thy gods Israel r" Rather, does it not show the 
consequences of the Church of God being connected 
with the great men of this world ; for then the devil 
will be sure to turn the wheel. And while our Mis- 
sionary, bible, and tract societies, and theological 
school's, are connected with the men of this world, 
the devil is sure to turn the wheel, and give the 
casting vote in his favour. 

Was the mind of God with the church at Corinth, 
when they perverted the right use of the Lord's 
supper ? 

Was the mind of God with the church of Rome, 
when they began to create titles, bishops, cardinals, 
arch-bishops, universal bishop, sovereign pontiff, 
Christ's vicar, prince of the apostles, &c. &c. — 
These measures were as innocent, I conceive, in 
their first appearance, as presidents, vice-presi- 
dents, corresponding secretaries, recording secreta- 
ries, board of directors, &c. which are ail unscrip- 
tural titles, names and offices, unbecoming God's 
people ♦ 



13 

And where did these titles lead to in the end ? 
Why they came up to our lord god the Pope, so- 
vereign Pontiff over the whole world ; having the 
keys of heaven, hell, and purgatory ; and whoever 
would go in, must pay toll to his holiness the Pope, 
and bow to what he thought right, or enter the hell- 
ish inquisition, and suffer death in the most horrid 
forms. All this was brought about by getting off 
gospel ground, under the show of religion, out of the 
warrant of the New Testament. Shall we not then 
take care of those innocent things you call titles, the 
corrupters of the Church of God. These are the 
scorpians that have stings in their tails, and have 
stricken thousands to ruin. Oh ye sons of Columbia ! 
stand up and look round yourselves; and behold 
what strides are making by an ever-busy clergy, tu 
forge the chains of tyranny for your bodies and con- 
sciences ! Be alarmed, before your necks are in the 
yoke — for these things must come in side-ways, or 
as an entering wedge; and one step off from gospel 
ground, gives room for another, until death is in the 
pot, and the devil at the wheel. 

Was the mind of God with his people, when the 
dissenting clergy from popery in England, ap- 
pointed king Henry head of the Church, and parlia- 
ment the guardians of its affairs ! ! See what fol- 
lowed : persecution, religious taxation, fines and 
imprisonment throughout England— the clergy 
prompting those in power, to do these things for 
their own gain. Surely the devil turned the wheel, 
and voted in the voters. And does it not sliow us, 
as a beacon, on our own coast, how we should en- 
deavour to keep the Church apart from any influence 
of the men of this world ; for they know not the 
things of the spirit; and hence their influence is 
always bad. But the clergy want to get hoid of 
their fat purses, and this is the way they have takers 
to do it : to build a sort of National Church, and let 
them come into it for pay ; having a fixed price for 
members, directors, and presidents for life ; and so 

B 



14 

they make a sort of half-brothers of the governors 
and rich men of this world. 

As for God's putting it in the hearts of his people 
to go this way to work to convert the world, it is 
what I cannot yet believe. For God cannot change* 
nor do I think he will change his plan of carrying 
on his work ; — and what monied institutions and so- 
cieties do we find, supporting the prophets among 
the Jews ; — or what self-created bodies for obtaining 
money, hacked the apostles and first preachers of 
the gospel ? Let some example, or authority, be 
shown from the word of God, if it can be. The au- 
thority of men will not answer for me, in a business 
of such importance. Give me — thus saith the Lord, 
or else give up the point. 

Did monied societies support the Reformers ? No; 
they hazarded all, and suffered the loss of all things 
for the sake of Christ. Hence we see, that this mo- 
dern practice of spreading religion by means of 
money, and monied societies, is neither sanctioned 
by the word of God, 'lior the example of the pro- 
phets, the apostles, or the reformers; but well agrees 
with the Church of Rome, and high Church of En- 
gland. The cry of money, money, is heard through- 
out the Church of Rome, from the pope to the friar ; 
and in the Church of England, from the bishop down 
to the warden constable. 

Has God, after four thousand years, changed his 
plan of carrying on his work? Or has He lately 
seen that monied institutions are necessary means 
for converting the world ? Certainly not, but the 
Lord's way of carrying on his work, does not suit 
men of high minds, who want to be gods themselves, 
and wrest from his hands the power of making 
christians in his own way ; and prescribe paths for 
Jehovah to walk in that may please themselves, and 
the men of this world. Where, in all the Scriptures, 
shall we find any self-created societies, and monied 
institutions, to advance the cause of true religion ! 
And if they cannot be found there, a man must be 
blind not to see that they are mere human inven- 



15 

iions ; and that the devil is turning the wheel ,• and 
will only corrupt the Church, and make mankind 
more degenerate and wicked. 

Monied institutions have supported the church of 
Rome, and high church of England, in their thirst 
for aggrandizement, and to lord it over the con- 
sciences of men. But dissenters, in no age, until 
of late, or about a century, have needed any such 
support. As for the Gospel, one of its chief glories 
is, that it stands on the arm of Omnipotence, and 
commends itself to the consciences of men — making 
its way through the kingdoms of this world, in spite, 
of all opposition. Though the heathen rage, and 
kings, and governors, and rulers of this world, have 
stood up against the Gospel and God's anointed, 
and have employed prisons, gibbets, flames, and 
death, in all their torturing forms, yet have they not 
prevailed Jf 

And how is it, that the rulers of this world, and the 
rich, and noble of the earth, who have in all ages 
opposed the Gospel, and voted against it, have now 
become its votaries and supporters ! ! 1 would as 
soon believe that the devil is turned a saint at last, 
as to believe this thing — that human nature should 
be so changed without a work of grace upon the 
heart. The truth lies here ; the men of this world 
have always been willing to support that which was 
called Gospel, or a form of religion, but not the 
tiling itself; for that they hate, and have in ail ages 
of the world. To support the mere form of religion, 
or a false religion, corrupt men have always been 
ready enough. Witness their readiness to support 
idolatry — to support the See of Rome — the Cru- 
sades! the Pagan — Mahometan, and all such false 
and formal religions ! Witness how zealous the 
Pharisees were to support their forms of error, and 
the traditions of the elders, at the expence of the ^ 
blood of Christ and his apostles ! Witness the Pagan 
emperors, putting hundreds of thousands to death, 
to support their absurd Paganism ! Witness the 
high church of England, and church of Rome, de- 



16 

stroying and persecuting the most pious in their 
borders, to support a form of godliness of their own 
invention, suited to the taste of corrupt lords, dukes, 
kings, queens, and emperors ! Can I, with all these 
truths before me, and many more, believe that the 
pompous proceedings, and monied schemes of the 
present day, are of God ! ! It is only because the 
devil is in all these schemes and inventions, that his 
children support them, and honour them w r ith their 
presence and approbation. This one circumstance 
is sufficient to convince me that these great works 
are not of God, and will only prove an injury to the 
cause of true religion. 

It is certain, that all the pomp and show we now 
see, for promoting the Lord's work, will at last be 
brought to naught ; because it is not the way of 
God's choosing. And he will clear all this rubbish 
away, and afterwards work in his own way, and by 
instruments of his own choice. For our Lord 
saith, « marvel not that the world hate you $ for you 
know it hated me before it hated you. It hateth me, 
because I testify the deeds thereof are evil.'? What 
then ! do natural men support him and his cause, 
when they have hated him and his cause in all ages ? 
How inconsistent in itself! It is supporting the 
thing in appearance only, or that which has a show 
of the cause of Christ, but which, in reality, is the 
devil's cause in masquerade. And this has been the 
manner of the devil, from the days of Cain, down to 
Constantine the Great ; to set up a form of religion, 
in opposition to the true religion by grace and faith, 
and maintain it in the world, by men of this world ; 
condemning, killing, and destroying, by a thousand 
infernal tortures, all the children of God that oppose 
it. But, in the days of Constantine, he seems to 
have come to his senses ; and, as if he saw, that the 
massacre of millions could not stop the progress of 
the religion of Jesus Christ ; or, as if gorged with 
blood, or satisfied with cruelty, he comes to a eessa- 
sion of arms, all on a sudden ; and sits still, as an 
idle spectator, for a good while. During this time, 




H 

Consiantine repeals all persecuting laws, and then 
establishes religion by law ; : honouring the ministers 
of the Gospel — giving them salaries, and making 
every thing in religion grand, rich and pompous. 
I But how soon does the devil improve on this 
plan, and turn all into show and form again ;-— and 
then follows persecution of the saints ; which has 
shown itself more or less in every country throughout 
Christendom. In England, though they cast off thU 
cruel yoke of Popery, yet they set up the idol of 
uniformity ; manifestingthe same persecuting spirit, 
and contending, by kings, queens, lords of parlia- 
ment, magistrates, and constables, for the support 
of a form of godliness, and will- worship ; at the 
same time, opposing the Gospel in its purity and 
simplicity ; and fining and imprisoning those who 
adhered to it. How dangerous then is a form of re- 
ligion, armed with the civil power ! and how dan- 
gerous to trust a body of learned and monied clergy, 
with any kind of power. Our fathers who composed 
the convention to form the Contitution of the State 
of North Carolina, knew the danger of these men ; 
therefore, inserted an article that no minister of the 
Gospel, having the cure of souls, should have a seat 
in either house of the Legislature. They had tasted 
the gall and venom of this tribe of money-getting 
characters, and therefore, guarded against therri in 
that article. And if it were not for this article, we 
should see them electioneering, this way and that 
way, to get into the Legislature. And could they 
once obtain an ascendency in the government, they 
would ride rough-shod over the consciences and pro- M 
perty of the people, like all other tyrants. There 
would be no danger in letting the good become mem- 
bers, but to keep out the bad and designing, our fa- 
thers thought best to keep all out— and they were 
right. 

It has been said, that money and education are 

power. And does not money and education fill the 

offices of state ? Does not money and education levy 

war, and carry it on ? What would America have 

B % 






►'18 

done in the revolution, had it not been for her wise 
counsellors, continental money, and the silver crowns 
of France ! And what would the missionary socie- 
ties do for runners and beggars, if it were not fur- 
money ! What would the Pope of Rome have done 
for priests to carry about his indulgences and par- 
dons to sell, had it not been for money, a part of 
which went to pay the priests for their trouble, and 
the balance was for the Pope to carry on his schemes. 
It is just so with many of our modern priests : money 
causes them to go about ; a part of what they get 
they have for begging ; and the balance is for the 
Board of Directors to carry on their plans and 
schemes. And what they will do in the end, time 
only can reveal. We see them now making mighty 
strides in every part of the union, to get hold of 
money, and what new tricks and schemes are to be 
played under the mask of religious benevolence to 
attain something out of view, and not heretofore 
known in the devil's politics, is left wholly to conjec- 
ture. 

I have heen told of late, the Baptists were like 
Israel without a king. Now the Israelites desired 
Samuel to ask the Lord to give them ff king that 
they might be like the nations around them, and have 
a great man to fight their battles and go in and out 
before them, but some of our modern Baptists are 
not so condescending to God as Israel was, to ask of 
him a great man, or men to go before them ; or 
agreeably to the words of Christ, « pray to the Lord 
of the harvest to send out more labourers into his 
vineyard j 1 ' but to be like the Church of England, 
and the Presbj tcrians around them, they have 
without any authority from the Lord, set up a priest- 
ly polishing machine at head quarters, to polish 
oyer young men, and make great ministers of them, 
to fight their battles and go in and out before them. 
Are they afraid to trust their cause with God any 
longer, and so have rejected him after enjoying his 
protection such a length of time, and w ill they now 
depend on an arm of flesh ? 



The church of Rome, and other churches, tried 
the experiment of making great learned divines, 
and soon these great divines, bishops, parsons, cu- 
rates and friars, must have great salaries, and be 
maintained in high dignity by the people. And so 
it will be with these young doctors from head quar- 
ters, after going through the polishing machine ; 
for, work they cannot, though they will not be 
ashamed to beg, since it has become fashionable for 
divines in broad cloth to follow this trade. 1 should 
like to know how many we have among us that 
would rather go to doctor Greatman fur instruction, 
than to Jesus Christ, and would pre fer to show them- 
selves approved men for talents and learning, than 
study to show themselves approved of God for a holy, 
pious, humble life ; or diligence in the ministry, 
knowledge of the holy Scriptures, having their mi- 
nistry written on the tables of many hearts — by the 
power of the spirit of God attending their unpolish- 
ed discourses, to the salvation of men </' 

If what I hear be true, that there are about twelve 
thousand in all the various polishing machines in 
this country, preparing themselves to hunt fortunes, 
live without work, and to please the world, and these 
like devouring locusts, are soon to be let loose, fly- 
ing to the most populous towns and cities, and look- 
ing about in every hole and corner of the union, 
where the fattest purse is to be had ; in order to 
live on the labours of others, in pomp and style — for 
one, I pray, they may keep away from North Caro- 
lina; for we have fortune hunters and beggars 
enough already, who produce disputes, jars and dis- 
cord among brethren of the same church, if we re- 
fuse to give, and are unwilling to be stripped of our 
hard earnings ; while our everyday, but faithful 
and humble ministers, are neglected, and can 
scarcely procure decent clothing, and provide the 
necessaries of life for themselves and families. 

But we are told by some of our doctors and reve- 
rends, that they do not undertake to make ministers 
out of any sort of men;— that they do not think to 



**% 



20 

change the heart, or call any one to the ministry. 
This, they let us know, they leave for God to do ; 
while their machine is for giving the last polish — the 
finishing touch to their qualifications ; which opera- 
tion, is considered far superior, to enable them to 
please men, than any thing God has done to them, 
or can be expected to do. Now, in the name of the 
best of causes, and for its sake, I ask them, to give 
me example or precept from the word of God, or 
show any of the prophets, John the Baptist, or any 
of the apostles, who, after being called of Goo" to 
their respective missions, that ever went to sc#ool, 
or to study under Dr. Greatman, in order to fear/j 
how to preach, or what to preach! No example or 
precept from the word of God, can be produced in 
.support of such a practice ; and it is evident, that 
these theological schools, or machines for polishing 
ministers, are the inventions of the devil, who is 
working in the back ground, to undermine the 
Church of God, and corrupt the ministry and society 
in general, and 611 the world with oppression, 
wretchedness, and misery. 

Look, and see, among the prophets and apostles, 
whether the Lord had such respect to education and 
learning! What sort of men did he choose, for the 
most part, to preach his gospel? and what sort of 
men has he chosen, in all ages of the Church, to de- 
clare his counsel unto men ? Peter, John, and all the 
apostles, Paul excepted, were^unlearned and unlet- 
tered men ; yet, Christ made this no bar, hindrance, 
or disqualification, to their being his apostles ; and 
generally, in all ages of the Church, God has chosen 
the poor and unlearned to preach his word ; and 
made them mighty, through grace, to the pulling 
down of the strong holds of Satan's kingdom ; in 
order, that the power might be of God, and not of 
men. This cannot be denied ; j&et our .doctors of 
divinity are trying to pervert th£or$M^b'f God, or 
help him to finish the work of cnafftying ministers. 
Hear Paul's observations on ministers, &c. " God 
hath chosen the foolish things of the world, to con- 



found the wise ; and the weak things of the world, 
the base, the despised, and. things which are not, 
hath God chosen:" for what? that no flesh should 
glory in his presence. And these observations agree 
with God's conduct in the choice of ministers in all 
ages, except in a few cases. But our wise and learn- 
ed doctors, have found out a more excellent way, 
they think, than God's way j— they are going to in- 
struct and polish numerous young men for the min- 
istry. They may ruin them, but they cannot better 
them, unless it be to please men. To better them, 
to please God or profit his church and people, they 
cannot. For preaching is a gift — the gift of God; 
and what doctors of divinity are not able to give. 

1 do not think myself guilt}' of a breach of reli- 
gious charity, in saying, that these polishing ma- 
chines, lately established for qualifying young men # 
to preach, are of the devil, and from high-minded 
men, who want to maintain their cause by human 
strength, and an arm of flesh. These high-minded 
doctors seem, indeed, to me, like some men, who 
dislike their -Maker's work, in making the handsome 
and elegant horse. Say some, his ears are too 
long — they must be cropt ; — say others, his. tail 
hangs too much down, — he must be nicked, before hc>* 
can please us : and to work they go, to better the 
Creator's work, or to make a horse to their own 
fiking.jg Jiist so with our learned doctors : after 
God lias converted and called a poor young man to 
the ministry, and furnished him with every needful 
qualification, and directed him to go and preach his 
gospel, it will not answer — he does not please the 
doctors — he does not speak grammar, nor is he elo- 
quent enough to command the respect of the people. 
He is not even polite in his manners, and does not 
know how to conduct himself properly in genteel 
company. He must 5$ altered before he will answer 
for a preacher, or be able to please the people, and 
obtain a salary. Thus the proud and high-minded 
of this world, have, in all ages, set at naught God's 
ministers, and have heaped up to themselves teach- 






,*L* 



si 

ers/ having itching ears, who have sounded forth 
their own praise, and had an eye to the purse. 

But God's ministers seek not to go forth in the 
excellency of speech, and of man's wisdom ; for 
they know that the wisdom of this world is foolish- 
ness with God, and they wish to speak as of the 
ability which God giveth them. But something of 
the hands of man must be on ministers in this day, 
before they can preach to please ; and to w T ork doc- 
tors go, to make them more than God has thought 
proper to do. Thus they become deformed and dis- 
figured ; first, by cropping their long ears of hu- 
mility in dress and manners, and giving them a 
proud, dressy carriage, and the polite manners of a 
young lawyer — which in a minister of the humble 
Jesus, is more offensive to the pious, than the 
% vilest reptile. Secondly, they learn them to run 
straight for the purse ; and, where the most money 
and the largest salaries are to be got. Thirdly, they 
learn them to speak in high flown words, and pom- 
pous expressions, so that the poor and unlearned 
are not able to understand them; and thus they be- 
come as barbarians to them that hear. Fourthly, 
they are made to despise the poor, of which class 
€ they once were,* before made gentlemen, fortune- 
hunters, &c. Fifthly, all equality among ministers 
is destroyed ; and, at length, none must be allowed 
to preach at all, unless they are learned meH : and 
thus the apostles will be put in the back ground, as 
well as most of God's ministers, and the devil will 
bear the chief sway in all the churches. Then, all 
who live godly in Christ Jesus, will suffer persecu- 
tion, as in former times; for, umegenerate and high 
minded priests, have been the greatest persecutors 
of the righteous in every age of the world. 

When doctors and reverends saunter, and hanker 
about state legislators, members of congress, and 
fawn on governors, and chief men of state, cringing 
and begging, it is time for Americans to look out 
They are not walking in the footsteps of the 'Apos- 
tles, but are seeking their own ends; and are endea- 



touring to bring together church and state. Nay* ** 

it seems, this unnatural connexion is now begun, if 

we look at the minutes of the Missionary, Tract, 

Bible and Theological Education Societies, and see 

whose names are there enrolled as donors, officers, 

&e. &e. 

The Emperor Constantine, and his men of state, 

with the clergy's juggling together, produced the 

deviHn the end, though all was fair weather at first, 

as it is now among us. But storms gathered, and 

at length burst forth in fury and destruction to the 

people of God. The kings of England, parliament, 

and the clergy, began to play into each others hands — 

and what has been the effect? Let us beware of 

new and linscriptural projects, — Look at Peter the 

Hermit, in rags, running bare-foot from city to city, 

preaching up the crusades, or holy wars as they 

were termed — drawing kingdoms into this popular 

scheme, and causing: the destruction of about thir- 

Aft 
teen thousand lives in this foolish new project. ^9-^. 

What destruction is witnessed, when church and ** 
state meet together ! Look at tlie priests in France, 
with crucifixes in their hands, encouraging the 
blood-thirsty Catholics in the murder of sixty thou- % 
sand Protestants in a night ! Look at the Pope of 
Rome, sending his priests to Baptise at the point of 
the sword ; and, because the Welehmen refused, 
slaughtered them by thousands ! Look at king • 
George, sending his learned priests into this coun- 
try, and fixing a salary on them of sixteen thousand 
pounds of tobacco a year, to maintain them in idle- 
ness, luxury and pride ! Look at the whippings and 
imprisonings of the Baptists, in Virginia, and other 
states, by means of these same well fed priests ! 
Money and learning out of their proper place, or 
improperly used, corrupt the church and ministry of 
God. And these corrupting societies overturn any 
government, however strong its foundation may be 
at first laid. Because, there is a combination of ta- 
lents, interest and party spirit; which if strong 
enough, will prevail over all impedutients, destroy 



24 



♦ liberty of conscience, establish its own power, and 
fill the land with oppression, wretchedness and mi- 
sery. Money is a good thing — education is a good 
thing — power is a good thing — law is a good thing- — 
and death is a good thing — but, they must all stand 
in their proper place — be used by a proper hand— - 
regulated by a right spirit, and for a right end ; else 
they become scourges of the worst kind to human 
beings. 

iO * It is deemed proper to state, that the author of 
the foregoing pages is a member of the Baptist Church, 
in North Carolina, in very respectable standing. This 
statement, however, is made, without the knowledge or 
consent of the writer. 






MINUTES 



OP THE 



Kehukee Baptist Association, 

HOLDEN AT 

Martin County, JV*. C. 
The 6th, 7th, and 8th days of October, 1832, 



SATURDAY, October 6th, 1832.- 

1. The Introductory Sermon, (agreeably to appointment,) 
was delivered by Elder Joseph Biggs, from 2 Corinthians, 14 
chap. 40 verse: "Let all things be done decently and in order." 
Prayer by Elder Mark Bennett. 

2. The Association then convened and being opened with 
prayer by Elder William Hyman, proceeded to business, and 
chose Elder William Hyman, Moderator; Elder Joseph Biggs, 
Clerk, who called to his assistance Brother Joseph D. Biggs. 

3. Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations, (of the 
same faith and order with us,) were invited to seats. 

4. On motion, the letiers of representation from the chur- 
ches that compose this Association, were called for, and hand-' 
ed in by their messengers, when twenty-nine letters were read f 
and took the following account as stated in the table of churches, 

5. Elder Thomas Dupree, from the Contentnea Associa- 
tion, handed in a quantity of their last Minutes, in which was 
found that himself, and Elder Mark Bennett, were appointed 
messengers from that Association to this, and they took seat§ 
wyuh us, 





2- 


























5 


t*3 




Co 




1 


CHURCHES. 


MINISTERS & DELEGATES. 


So" 






o 


Co 




3 

CM 






Si, 


ft" 


*** 




a. 






D.C. 


1 Baregrass, — 


Daniel Biggs, James Harrison, 






5 




1 31 


1 00 


2 Blunts Creek,-- 


Lodowick Redditt, Robert Tripp, 


2 






2 


2 1 


44 


1 00 


3 Coenjock,\ 


SAMUEL TATUM,* 














90 




4 Conoho, — 


James Mayo, John Bryant, 


1 






1 






59 


1 00 


5 Conetoe, — 


James Thigpen, William Thigpen, 


3 




1 




1 




29 


1 25 


6 Concord, 


MICAJAH AMBROSE, Daniel 




















Clifton,* 








2 


2 




44 


1 00 


7 Cross Roads, 


WM. HYMAN, Joseph J. Pippen, 










1 




41 


1 00 


8 Deep, Creek, — 


Reuben Higgs. Thomas Godwin,,* 


2 




5 






1 


61 


75 


9 Falls Tar River, - 


Joseph S. Battle, James S. Battle, 


9 


3 




.2 


5 


, 


2 00 


10 Flat Swamp, 


LUKE WARD,Edm'd Andrews, 






3 


4 




86 


1 50 


41 Frying Pan,-\ 


JOHN RICHARDSON,* 












24 




12 Goose Greek, — 


Henry Carrow, Malachi Linton, 


1 




1 


i; l 




27 


1 25 


13 Great Swamp,- - 


Nobles Stancil, Willi, Fleming, 


1 




3 


2 




94 


1 50 


14 Grindle Creek, f 


WILLIAM CLARK,* 














97 




15 Hunting Quar- 




















ters, — 


Thomas Robertson, Wm. Gaskill, 














92 


3 00 


16 Kehukee, — 


John Shield, Turner Brewer, 


3 




1 




1 




141 


75 


17 Lawrence's M.H. JOSHUA LAWRENCE, Arthur 




















Parker, 


1 


2 






2 


67 


1 50 


18 Little Alligator, - 


Edward Payne, Joseph Evans, 










i 


12 


1 00 


19 Morattock, — 


Charles Blount, Jacob Wiikerson, 


4 




2 


1 


i 


90 


1 50 


20 A'or^ Creek, 


LEMUEL ROSS,* Thomas Bar- 










1 








row, Noah Gaskins, 


3 


1 




1 


3 1 


61 


1 60 


21 MMatta?nuskeet 


ASA SAWYER, John Jordan, 










j 


25 


1 32 


22 0/^ i?ord, — 


Wm. Singleton, J. D. Harrington, 












8 


50 


23 .P/co-f M i7. — 


John Murdough* James Hinson, 






3 


3 




46 


1 00 


24 Powel's Point, \ 


• ~ ■* ~ - 












20 




25 Puhgo, — 


Solomon Carter, John R. Davis, 


1 






1 


2 


14 


1 00 


26 #eecfy Creek, 


W. HUDGINS,* James Martin, 










1 








Samuel Lancaster, 


55 


5 


1 


2 


o' 


90 




27 Scuppernong, — 


Joseph Barnes, Robert Bartie, 










1 


21 


1 00 


28 S.Mattamuskeet, 


GEO. W. CARROWAN, Rich- 








j 










ard M. G. Moore. 


5 




25 


3 ! 3 


4 


90 


2 60 


29 Skewarkey, 


JOSEPH BIGGS,JOHN WARD, 1 


2 




4 




81 


2 00 


30 Smi/h*wick's Cr.- 


MICAJAH PERRY, HUMPH- 




















REY STALLINGS, 








2 


3 




42 


1 05 


31 Sownd Side, — 


Zebulin Kemp, Geo.W. Alexander, 












a 


27 


1 25 


32 Spring Green, — 


Lewelling Bowers, Stephen Outer- 




















bridge, - 


1 








1 




51 


1 00 


33 Tarborough, — 


Cofield King, Ely Porter, 


2 


1 




2 






55 


1 00 


34 Tranter's Cr'k,f 


JEREMIAH LEGGITT,* 














33 




35 Washington, — 


Levin Wallace, Jesse Allen, 






1 


1 


1 


' 43 


1 00 


36 White Plains, 


MILES EVERITT, Jonathan 


- 
















Wallace, 


2 












32 


1 50 


37 Williams's MH\ 


■■' 














39 




Total, 


97 


14 


46 


$4 


34 


11 


2014 


38 82 



NOTE. Pastors of Churches, and other ordained Ministers, are in small CA- 
PITALS; unordained Ministers mitalics. Those marked thus,* were not present; 
from Churches marked thus, f we received no intelligence, in that case their 
number stands as last year. Dashes — denote no Pastors. The last column 
shews the contributions from theXhurch.es to the Association fund. 



3 

6. A petitionary letter for membership in this Association, 
was handed in from a church lately consthuted at North Matta- 
muskeet, Hyde county, by their messengers, Asa Sawyer and 
John Jordan; the letter was read, and upon further information, 
the said church was received a member of this body, and de- 
monstrated by the Moderator giving the messengers the right 
hand of fellowship. 

Another letter of same kind, from a church in Carteret coun- 
ty, at Hunting Quarters, was handed in by their messengers, 
Thomas Robertson and William Gaskilf; the sarn:^ was read, 
and upon satisfactory information of their faith and order, they 
were received a member of this body, and manifested by the 
Moderator giving the messengers the right hand of fellowship. 

7. The following committees were appointed, (viz:) Elders 
Joseph Biggs, William Hyman, Thomas Dupree, and Mark 
Bennett, to examine the Circular Letter. Brethren Joseph 
S. Battle and James S. Battle, on finance. Jos. D. Biggs to 
prepare a letter to the Contentnea Association. Brother James 
8. Battle to prepare one to the Little River Association. All 
to report on Monday next. 

8. Elders Joshua Lawrence, Thomas Dupree and Mark 
Bennett, were requested, (by private ballot,) to occupy the 
st age in preaching on the morrow, and that divine worship 
feomrnetice at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

9 Resolved, that our next Association be holden at the Falls 
Tar River, Nash county, to commence on Saturday before the 
first Sunday in October, 1833, at 11 o'clock, A, M. 

The Association was then adjourned until Monday next, 9 
o'clock, A. M. with prayer by Elder Thomas Dupree. 

SUNDAY, October 7th, 1832. 

The brethren requested to occupy the stage this day, pro- 
ceeded in the following manner, (viz:) Elder Thomas Dupree 
preached from St. John, 10 chap, and part 10 verse: "I am 
come that they might have life, and that they might have it 
more abundantly." Elder Joshua Lawrence preached from 
37 Psalm, 39 verse: "But the salvation of the righteous, is of 
the Lord, he is their strength in the time of trouble." (Elder 
Mark Bennett being sick,) Elder Joseph Biggs prayed and 
dismissed the assembly. From the apparent atteniion of the 
large congregation, we hope the labors of love will not be lost, 
MONDAY (morning) October 8th, 1332. 

The Association being met agreeably to adjournment, was 
opened with prayer by Elder Joseph Biggs, and then proceed- 
ed to business. The Constitution and Rules of this Associa- 



tion were read, the'names of the delegates from the several 
churches were called, and the absentees marked. 

10. The committees appointed on Saturday last, were call- 
ed on to report, when Brother Joseph D. Biggs, who was ap- 
pointed to prepare a letter of correspondence to the Content- I 
nea Association, handed in one, which was read and approved, 
and Elders JosmiA Lawrence; and William Hyman were ap- 
pointed messengers to bear the same to therq. Brother James 
S. Battle, who was appointed to write to the Little River As- 
sociation, handed in a letter which was read and approved, 
and Brethren James S. Battle and Joseph S. Battle, were ap- 
pointed messengers to bear the same. Elder Joseph Biggs, 
from the committee appointed to examine the Circular Letter* 
reported that some of that committee had done so, and recom- 
mend that the same be read in this Association, which was 
done and highly approbated by this body, and ordered to be at- 
tached to these Minutes, 

The Committee on finance reported that they find in the hands of 

the Treasurer, at the close of last Association, the sum of $61 00 

Paid Elder Joseph Biggs, for preparing last year's Minutes for 
the Press, superintending the printing:, and transcribing one co- 
py on our Association records, and distributing the Minutes to 
the several churches and sister Associations with whom we cor- 
respond, the sum of - - . $10 00 

Faying the Printer for striking 500 copies, - SO OQ 4Q q Q 

$21 00 

Received in contributions from the churches at this Association, 38 83 

Leaving a balance in the hands of the Treasurer of $59 82 

The Association concurred with the report. 

11. The biographies of the lives and deaths of Elders 
JohstBowen and Green Carrowan, were presented to this Associ- 
ation, and ordered to be spread on our Minutes. 

12. Queries were called for, when the following were offer- 
ed, read and received for debate, (viz:) First, Is it orderly for 
a. member of the Baptist church, or more especially, one who 
pretends to exercise a public gift, to keep a tipling shop] An- 
swer, We think it disorderly; for such a member is the cause 
or corrupter of the good morals of spciety, and an encourager 
of evil; and much more sp in one who professes to preach, be- 
cause better examples are expepted of him. Second Query. 
Suppose a ehurdi, constituted uppn the abstract principles 
of the 'United Baptist Society, should become so circumstanced 
after her constitution, that a majority does dissent from those 
principles, and thereby forces the minority which still adheres 



5 

to the first principles of the church, to withdraw, or take letters 
of dismissions, or be excommunicated, which party is the origi- 
nal church, the majority or the minority! Answer, We think 
the minority is still the church; for it is our opinion that if there 
should be in this minority only three pious orderly white male 
members, that they are the original church, because they ad- 
here to first principles; and we would further advise, that those 
three pious members choose from among themselves suitable 
church officers, and not admit any into their body, who may 
have been excommunicated for impious conduct, (although 
they may be of the same faith and order,) without satisfactory 
acknowledgments; but if there be not in such minorities three 
male members as before stated, we would advise them to join 
some other church; and we would advise any of the churches in 
our Association upon satisfactory evidence to receive them; and 
further, when those three (or more) members shall be proper- 
ly organized, that they will stand on our list and be considered 
as the original church, and bearing the same name, or any 
name they may choose. 

13. On motion, agreed that the publication of the History of 
this Association, as a continuation of that published by Elders 
Jesse Read and Lemuel Burkjtt, from the year 1803, up to this 
time, be deferred another year, and that subscription papers 
be sent to the different churches, to obtain more subscribers; 
and the churches are requested to return them to Mr. George 
Howard, of Tarborough, or Elder Joseph Biggs, of Williams- 
ton, by the first day of April, 1833; so that if the former and 
latter subscriptions will justify the work's being done, in that 
case the printing will then be attended to. 

14. Elder Luke Ward was appointed to prepare a Circular 
Letter for our next Association, on any subject he may select. 

15. Elder William Hyman is requested to deliver an intro- 
ductory Sermon to next Association, and in case of failure, El- 
der George W. Carrowan is requested to do the same. 

16. Elder Joseph Biggs is requested to transcribe, and pre- 
pare these Minutes for the press, superintend the printing of 
500 copies, and distribute them as usual to the churches, and 
reserve and send to the Associations with whom we correspond, 
one copy for each church therein, and record one on our Asso- 
ciation records. 

The Association then adjourned, to the time and place ap- 
pointed, with prayer by Elder Joshua Lawrence. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Moderator. 
JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk. 



CIBCinbAlt MTffESS* . 

Very dear Brethren in the Lord, we, under the kind and indulgent pro. 
vidence of God, have had another interview according; to our annual cus- 
tom, and send you our Christian salutation by this epistle, and would wish, 
that with our whole hearts we could salute you, dear brethren, as saints 
stedfast in the faith, abounding in the works of the Lord, instead of the 
works of strife and division that we hear is going on in some of the chur- 
ches; for we hear that some have taken exceptions^ the doctrine of elec- 
tion, as contained in the third article of the abstract principles, upon which- 
the Kehukee Association was first founded, and has so, long stood and flou- 
rished, and been the mother of many others; and that in opposition to, and 
for this doctrine, you are contending and striving among yourselves, which 
of course must be the cause of much distress among you, to godly souls and 
lovers of the truth. But dear brethren is it so, that all the mighty host of 
Baptist ministers of past ages that settled upon this article, in Kngland, and 
have maintained it as an article of their creed, in the face of fires, banish- 
ments, prisons and death; were all the worthies of the Philadelphia Asso- 
ciation, that adopted this as one article of their Christian faith, and set 
down on it as an x\ssociation, all mistaken?- We ask you, were all the 
worthy ministers and members of the churches that first formed the Ke- 
hukee Association, and made this as one sacred article of truth, in their 
Confession of Faith, were they all deceived? And for God's sake, are all 
the Baptist ministers, Associations, and churches in England, Wales, Ire- 
land, Scotland and America, now deceived, with the thousands that have 
died before us, in the faith of this article? Do stop and pause, and answer 
us, if they were or are, we should like to know wherein, and would beg 
the favor of you, or any man among you, to inform us from express scrip- 
ture, wherein this article does not agree with the scriptures; if it does not, 
We are we think honest enough if wrong, to be righted. Or, if this article 
does not agree with express scripture, and that without equivocation, we 
pledge ourselves to give it up; but we think, like the thousands of the Bap- 
tists of England and America, that this article is provable from express 
scripture, and therefore, subscribe to it with our whole hearts, as a corres- 
pondent truth to God's word. And is it so, dear brethren, that men of 
yesterday, have got more sense than all these ancient worthies of God, 
who have faced dangers, suffered wrongs, endured persecutions, and loss 
of property, liberty and life, in defence of this truth? fie, fie, fie. And is 
it so, that a new ray of light has just descended from heaven, into some of 
your heads, to see that this article, and all the Baptists that hold it, are 
wrong; and all those of former ages? If so, do let some of the rest of us 
light our torches at your fire, that we may see also, where it is wrong by 
scripture, and not by false reasoning, nor laying down false premises, and 
thus of course drawing false conclusions; give us thus saith the Lord, and 
that will do for us, (and nothing short of it will,) and up we will give the 
article, if showed where it is wrong, from the scriptures of truth. In or- 
der therefore, brethren, to stop this sour fermentation, that is going on 
among you, and prevent, one saying, I am of Paul, and another of Cephas 
and a third? of Christ, and unite you in love, we will take up this subject 
from the scriptures fairly, and reason upon it deliberately, and as clearly 
as we can, in the short compass of a Circular Letter, for the purpose of sa- 
tisfying your minds, on this all important article of the Christian faith, or 



f 

Kehukee Association creed. And first, we have too high an opinion of 
your good sense, dear brethren, to believe that the contentions among you, 
is about whether election be a bible doctrine, or not, for this no man that 
has read his bible can deny but the bible is full of the word election in 
many places, and is expressed plainly in many places — yea, in more than 
one hundred it is expressed, and plainly and strongly implied. And in- 
deed it should be so, seeing it is one of the most fundamental parts of the 
gospel system, and without which there can be no gospel system; nor is 
there any part of the gospel system, in the whole book of God, more plain 
or more plainly proven, than that of the doctrine of election. The whole 
book of God is full of it; this point we shall take for granted. You will not 
deny but that election is a bible doctrine; but every mar* has his own way 
to explain election, so that he can swallow this doctrine: and there has been, 
and now is, as many ways to hold to and believe in election, almost as 
there are heads in the world. This you will also, (we presume,) not de- 
ny. Among the rest of election holders, believers and explainers, the Ke- 
hukee Association has hers, which is found in the third article of her creed, 
and reads as follows, (viz:} "We believe that God before the foundation of 
the world, for a purpose of his own glory, did elect a certain number of 
men, and angels to eternal life, and that this election is particular, eternal, 
and unconditional on the creatures part." Thus the Kehukee Association, 
and the churches that, have composed it for sixty odd years, have beiieved, 
holden, and explained their views, in a short way, of the election contain- 
ed in the bible; which we come now to compare with the scriptures, to see 
if she is right or wrong, in her views of election as contained in the book 
of God. And we are well aware that the prejudices of the world are 
against us, for man by nature does not believe nor cordially receive this 
doctrine; but instead of this being a proof against election, it is a proof in 
our favor. Because if what the scripture says be true, that "men must be 
born again," "renewed in the spirit of their minds," and if any man be in 
Christ Jesus he is a new creature, old things are passed away, and all things 
become new, and all things of God; then it follows, that unconverted man 
[that don't believe in election, that after conversion will believe it; because 
he is renewed in this change, all things become new, and of course a 
new faith, the reverse of that he used to believe. We know that the world 
hate and oppose the doctrine of election; this is a good proof that election 
is a truth, and of God; for the carnal mind is enmity against God, and of 
course and this doctrine of truth, yea, the doctrine of election. But this is 
not our argument; for it is admitted, that you believe that election is a bi- 
ble doctrine, and a doctrine of truth; but not true in the way the Kehukee 
Association holds it. Then to lay the argument down plainly, that is, we 
must prove, God has a purpose; and secondly, we must prove particular 
and eternal election; and thirdly, we must prove unconditional election on 
the creatures part. This we think to be a fair statement of the subject, on 
which they have raided their exceptions against the ihird article. We be- 
lieve that God before the foundation of the world, &c. Now what is the 
meaning of the word purpose? It means intention, design, to intend to do, 
to resolve, in a word, it means a full intention to do, a settled and fixed de- 
termination, a full decree and purpose of mind to do a thing. Now that 
this is a scripture doctrine, when applied to God according to scripture, 
we come to prove. Read ix. chapter Romans, 17th verse: "For the scrip- 
ture saith of Pharaoh for this same purpose have I raised thee up., that I 



8 

might show my j>ower in thee, and that my name might be declared 
throughout all the earth. " Now in this text we see Pharaoh raised up ac- 
cording to God's purpose; and for what but the glory of his name, that his 
po ver might be declared and made manifest to the world; so we see in 
this text God first purposes, and then works according to that purpose, de- 
sign, or resolve. Read Romans, viii. chapter, 2Sth verse: "And we know 
that all things work together for good, to them that love God, to them 
who are the called according to his purpose." Here we cannot be mista- 
ken, that sinners are called, that is, converted according to God's purpose. 
God had first designed, determined, and proposed the conversion of a sin- 
ner, and according to that intention, design and purpose, calls or converts 
his soul; so that the calling, or conversion, of every sinner, is the effect of 
God's prior purpose, and not otherwise. Read Romans, ix. chapter, 11th 
verse: "For the children being not yet born, neither having done good or 
evil, that the purpose of God, according to election might stand, not of 
works, but of him that calleth." Here, in this text* again you see God 
has a purpose, the basis of which don't rest on good or evil, or on works, 
but on his choice or election; which is shown by the whole tenor of the 
chapter, which you will read. Then God has a purpose to save sinners, 
and that purpose is the salvation of his choice, or elect; and that choice was 
made before men had done good or evil, as the effect of his love to his cho- 
sen. And Paul cites the circumstance of Jacob to prove, and illustrate it; 
saying, Jacob have I loved and Esau have I hated; before the children had 
done good or evil. Then he did not choose Jacob for his goodness, for he 
had done none, and the purpose had decided in his favor before he was 
born, as the effect of love and purpose. Then the salvation of sinners does 
not stand on the base of works, but on the bases of God's purpose, electiod 
and calling, as the text showeth. Not of works, but of him that calleth; 
and calling is according to election or choice. This is as much as our lim- 
its on this part. And now we must prove, that this purpose of God was 
before the foundation of the world. Read Ephesians, iii. chapter, 10th and 
11th verses: "To the intent (here see God's intention) that now unto the 
principalities and powers in heavenly places, (mark!) might be known by 
the church the manifold wisdom of God, according to the eternal purpose 
which he purposed in Christ Jesus our Lord." Think on this. Here you 
see God's purpose in eternity; for here it is expressly called his eternal 
purpose in Christ; to do what? to make known to the church, the manifold 
wisdom of God; that is, the gospel with all its blessings in train; which is 
called the wisdom of God, the hidden wisdom of God, in its purposed plan J 
and rich provisions for the salvation of sinners, as well as the power of God 
to salvation.' Read 2 Timothy, i. chapter, 9th verse: "Who hath saved us 
and called us with an holy calling, not according to our works, but accord- 
ing to his own purpose and grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus be- 
fore the world began." We are well aware of what proud hearts and ca- 
villers will say of this text; it means Paul and Timothy were called to the 
ministry, and that God gave them grace in Christ before the world began, 
to make them ministers; be it so, take it on your own ground, and it proves 
all that the third article requires; that is, the first part, that God before the 
foundation of the world did, &c. Now this text on your own cavilling 
ground proves, that God had a purpose before the foundation of the world; 
this yon will not deny, and that Paul and Timothy were saved and called 
to the ministry, according to that purpose of God before the foundation of 



n 

the world; then it proves that these two men were saved hy God's purpose 
and grace in Christ, before the world began; this you can't deny, for the 
text expressly says so, and not according to their own works; if so, not ac- 
cording to works, good, bad, or meritorious; then what follows, but that 
Paul and Timothy were saved by God's purpose and grace in Christ before 
the world began, so says the text, and not according to works. Now, dear 
brethren, don't you believe Paul and Timothy were both made Christians 
before they were called to the ministry? if so, and this text is specially 
applied to them as ministers, now converted, are you so blind as not to see 
it expressed in the text in the words, saved us, first by purpose and grace, 
and then called us with an holy calling. Now does this mean a calling to 
the ministry, or a calling from darkness to light? you will say to the min- 
istry; we say not, and if you will read and meditate on the text, and com- 
pare it with many other texts, you will be convinced of this error. Paul's 
writing to Timothy is true; don't God save all his people one way? don't 
he eall them all by the same spirit? are they not all the gracious objects of 
his purpose, grace. love and choice? though some are ministers and some 
are not, yet are they not all saved and called? Yes, brethren, they are all 
saved and called according to his purpose to do so, and has given grace to 
the objects of his love in Christ before the world began. Then, on yout* 
own ground, the text proves, that these two men were purposed to salva- 
tion, and the ministry, before the foundation of the world; and that proves 
ihe first part of the article. And can you say, if Paul and Timothy were 
saved and called this way, why the rest of God's people are not? we think 
it will puzzle you; but the tenth and next verse shews that all are, and 
reads thus: But is now made manifest by ihe appearing of our Saviour Je- 
sus Christ, &c. Now will you say that Christ has only appeared, and 
made manifest this purpose and grace of God that was given in Christ be- 
fore the world began; the date is set in the text, like it is in the third arti- 
cle, before the foundation of the world; for Paul and Timothy only? 
Brethren, we think you will no!; you know our limits will not admit us 
to quote, nor argue much; read for yourselves and don't be led away by a 
seducing spirit, for this must suffice on the first part, read Ephesians, u 
chap. 11 verse: "In whom also we have obtained an inheritance, being pre- 
destinated according to the purpose of him, who worketh all things after 
the counsel of his own will" — how full to the point is this text. Read 
1 John, iii. chap. 8 verse: "For this purpose the son of God was manifesto 
ed," &c. — read Isaiah, xiv. chap. 24th verse: "The Lord of hosts hath 
sworn, saying surely as I have thought so it shall come to pass, arid as I 
have purposed so shall it stand" — again, 27th verse: "For the Lord of 
hosts hath purposed and who shall disannul it, and his hand is stretched 
out and who shall turn it back." Ephesians, i. chap. 9th verse: "Having 
made known unto us, the mystery of his will according to his good plea- 
sure, which he hath purposed in himself." Enough more to the point, 
but if you will not believe this, you will not believe the bible. 

In the second part we must prove particular and eternal election, and as 
pur limits are so short, we might as well take in the third part to be prov- 
ed, that is, unconditional election, on the creature's part; then the argument 
will stand thus, we are to prove particular, eternal and unconditional elec- 
tion to be a bible doctrine. And what does the word elect or electioa 
mean? it means a choice, to choose or select; then first as to particular 
election, it is proved by every day's practice— a man goes to get, choose? 



10 

Select or elect a wife, she of course must be particular, because a particu- 
lar woman chosen from among the rest; and a man wants a horse, he goes 
into the drove, he makes his choice, of course it is a particular hor^e, and 
distinguished from all the rest; so there can't be such a thing as election 
without its being particular, not from the choice of a whip cut in the woods 
to the choice of a queen on her throne. All choice or election is particu- 
lar, a particular object, and there is no choice where the whole is taken; 
then election takes its select part, and leaves the balance, of any thing no 
matter what. So then particular election is provable from the every day's 
practice of men, and it is equally provable from the conduct of God; he 
chose David from among Jesse's sons, Saul out of, or before any other man 
in Israel; he chose his prophets and apostles, Noah to build the ark, Abra- 
ham from among the heathen, and a thousand other choices has God made 
among men, and who art thou that says nay, when you practice the same; 
all particular election on God's part, you will not this deny, and in all this. 
And what were the conditions in these elections of David, Saul, Samuel, 
Abraham, Jacob, Noah, the prophets or apostles? why none — see your fol- 
ly. But we dare not offer evidences, but to the scriptures — read Peter, i. 
chap. 2d verse: "Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the father, 
through sanctification of the spirit unto obedience and sprinkling of the 
blood of Jesus Christ." This one text will prove every thing we need in 
support of the third article; and the date of election is here set, in God's 
foreknowledge or according to his foreknowledge of man's fallen and pol- 
luted state. Then election is the act of God's choosing sinners by, or ac- 
cording to his foreknowledge; this surely carries us to eternity for election, 
for it is an act of God's foreknowledge, and of course before the world be- 
gan, as we shall prove presently. So then eternity and not time, God's 
foreknowledge and not his present knowledge, is the date of election; then 
of course eternal election is at once proven. But who were these elect? 
look in the first verse of the same chapter and it will shew you who Peter 
addresses as these elected objects, the strangers scattered throughout Pon- 
tus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia and Bithynia, these were the elect: who 
were these strangers? why Christians, that, had been dispersed in these 
countries by persecution; agreed, say you, if they were Christians we be- 
lieve as you do, and that after men believe then they are elected. We tell 
you this is a false doctrine, and not the doctrine of the text; what does the 
text say, elected when you believe, elected after you are converted? read 
elect, how, according to God's foreknowledge; then men are chosen be- 
fore they are Christians, if elected by God's foreknowledge, elected in 
eternity and not after they believe; elected to believe, elected to become 
Christians, and this election obtains it for them: this is the truth: and if 
these scattered strangers were addressed as the elect, then this election is 
particular, because these men were a few chosen out of the many, among 
whom they were scattered. And the text shews particular election, as 
well as eternal election; and it equally proves unconditional election; for 
what or how were they elected or chosen? read the text — through sanctifi- 
cation of the spirit. Then is it not plain, that at the very time the choice 
was made by God's foreknowledge, they were seen and beheld by God in 
his foreknowledge of them, to be unclean, needing the sanctification of his 
spirit to cleanse them; and further, that they were seen disobedient, and so 
chosen to obedience; and polluted from head to foot, and so elected thro' 
the sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ. Then it follows, as plain as 



a 

the nose in your face, that the text proves, particular, eternal and uncon- 
ditional election; for you dare not say their holiness of soul was the condi- 
tion, for that needed the sanctification of the spirit, and they were chosen 
through that means; you dare not say they were not sinners, for they were 
foreseen needing the sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ, that cleanses 
from all sin; and elected to be sprinkled with his blood; so then where is 
the condition, not goodness, nor good works, but all pollution from head to 
foot when chosen; so that the truth is, God chose his people in eternity, 
by his foreknowledge; and at the time the choice was made, he beheld the 
whole race of Adam laying in their blood and pollution; and out of this 
corrupr mass he made his choice, and left the rest to lie there; this is the 
truth, and the whole tenor of scripture shews it as well as observation and 
God's dealings in the world; and not only chose the persons, but the 
means too, sanctification of the spirit unto obedience and the sprinkling of 
the blood of his sin; so that the persons and the means to cleanse these ob- 
jects are all of God ? s choice. Then we ask you, brethren, where is the con- 
dition in election? see no condition on the creature's part, since all the 
means are of God; read Ephesians, i. chap. 4th verse: "According as he 
he hath chosen us in him (to wit, Christ) before the foundation of the 
world, that we should be holy and without blame before him in love" — 
5th verse: "Having predestinated us unto the adoption of children by Je- 
sus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his will" - 6th 
verse: "To the praise of the glory of his grace," &c. These three verses 
prove all the whole article to be correct; first, what is the good pleasure of 
his will r but the accomplishment of his purpose; secondly, what is meant, 
for a purpose of his own glory, in the article, but his praise — here in the 
text you see it expressed, to the praise of the glory of his grace; thirdly* 
who were the us, that he had chosen, spoken of in the text? why I, Paul, 
and you heathen sinful Ephesians — so a particular choice, because particu- 
lar persons, Paul and these Ephesians — when was this election or choice 
made? the text tells you and sets the time and date exactly, saying before 
the foundation of the world, he, God, chose them, and so of course elec- 
tion must be eternal; fourthly, for what cause were they chosen, and to 
what end? the text tells you to be holy and without blame before him (the 
chooser) in love: so you see again they were seen unholy when chosen, 
and in that state by God's foreknowledge chosen to be holy; so seen 
blameable and having no love to God, and in that state chosen to be blame- 
less, and in love, or be brought to love God. Where then is the condition 
on the creature's part? it can't be holiness, for they were chosen to be so, 
and of course don't have it before nor without that choice; it can't be a 
blameless life, because they are chosen to be blameless, and if they have it 
of themselves, then the choice is vain; so then no condition on the crea- 
ture's part to make his election. Then Paul spoke the truth when he said, 
what Israel obtained not that which he seeketh for, but the election obtain- 
ed it, and the rest were blinded. Now you see by all these texts that 
election obtains for these objects sanctification of the spirit, obedience, 
blood of sprinkling, holiness, and blamelessness and love. Some men say 
they believe in election, what Sirs do you believe? why, that God elected 
the Jews, his prophets, apostles and preachers; these we say are God's 
elect, and he elects people to office. Agreed, Sir, this we believe too; buf„ 
Sir, does election extend no farther? you say, no; we say it extends to 
poor lost perishing sinners: what does the article say? why it says, we* 



IS 

believe God did before the foundation of the world, choose or elect a cer- 
tain number of men and angels to eternal life: what does the text say we 
have quoted? according as he (to wit, God) hath (not will when we be- 
lieve) chosen us in him (Christ) before the foundation of the world; now 
were not these heathen Ephesians that Paul says were chosen of God, sin- 
ners? you dare not deny it: when were they chosen? the text tells you: 
then if chosen before the foundation of the world, both Paul, they, and all 
the rest of God's chosen people, were seen sinners when chosen. Here 
are two texts which let us subjoin: Herein is love, not that we loved God, 
but he loved us and sent his son to be a propitiation for our sins: We love 
him because he loved us: then God loves us, when we do not love him, 
and this love is the cause why he chose us; and as God's love is the cause 
why we love him, so God's having chosen us is the cause why any sinner 
chooses him: so said one, had not thy choice prevented mine, I ne'er 
should have chosen thee; read % Thessa. ii. chap. 13th verse: "But we are 
bound to give thanks always to God for you brethren beloved of the Lord, 
because God hath (not will) from the beginning chosen you to salvation, 
through sanctification of the spirit and belief of the truth. The word be- 
ginning, in this text, means like the other, before the world began; as, in 
the beginning was the word — this beginning here, proves the eternity of 
Christ: so also in the beginning God created the heavens and the earth: so 
this text clearly sets forth the eternity of God's choice of sinners, and we 
are told to what end, salvation; we are told the means by which the end 
of this choice is made and brought about, sanctification of the spirit and 
belief of the truth: God's love the cause, his choosing the effect of that 
cause, and the means chosen to bring about the end, salvation; so that this 
text proves all again that is necessary. And only see how nearly Paul 
and Peter agree: Paul says, before the foundation of the world this elec- 
tion took place, and the last verse quoted, from the beginning: Peter says, 
it took place according to God's foreknowledge, or by God's foreknowl- 
edge: Peter says, through sanctification of the spirit, and the blood of 
sprinkling: Paul says, through sanctification of the spirit and belief of the 
truth: see how near they agree, in eternal election and the means of eter- 
nal salvation. Now you that have read the bible, brethren, know it is full 
of election, and that of this kind, the election of God; to it we must refer 
you without further quotations. Predestination, ordaining and appoint- 
ing are all the fruit of election, and God's eternal purpose; and if you will 
read for yourself and compare the scriptures, you will find that predesti- 
nation to the adoption of children, appointing to obtain salvation in Christ, 
and ordaining and decreeing, and the oath of God to his son, all these doc- 
trines are unconditional on the creature's part, as well as election; and all 
equally eternal, and have their rise in the love of God to sinners, as well 
as election; besides the hundreds of absolute and unconditional promises of 
God to confirm all this found in the bible. If there be a condition in elec- 
tion, it must be one of three things, repentance, faith, or good works: re- 
pentance is said to be the gift of Christ, then that can't be the condition on 
the creature's part, because if a gift the creature has no part in the gift, for 
he repents as the effect of this gift; so is faith the gift of God, and a sinner 
believes by the working of God's mighty power, then a sinner has no part 
in this gift, but he believes as the effect of this given faith, was the effect of 
the power of God working in him; so by good works, the tree must be 
made good before the fruit can be good, then no thanks to the tree, but tq 



13 

him that made it so. What hast thou that thou didst not receive? and if 
thou didst receive it, why boast, or claim part, as if thou didst not receive 
it? So then, election is an omnipotent and sovereign act of God's love, 
foreknowledge and grace, free favor. The church of God is compared to 
a bride— what part has she in his choice? His choice is the first sovereign 
act; her consent don't make him choose; he has chosen before he proposed 
it to her. She is compared to a garden — what part has a garden in roak* 
ing itself the choice spot of the husbandman? chosen before prepared, or 
a seed sown; and the sowing of the seed there, is the effect of the place first 
being chosen. She is compared to a city — what part has a city in choos- 
ing its own foundation, or of rearing itself up? She is the temple of the 
living God — does the temple build itself, or doe3 it owe all its glory to oth- 
er h;inds? These are questions for those to answer, dear brethren, and 
consider among you that doubt unconditional election. We presume you 
can have no other idea of any condition in election, unless it be good 
works of some kind; nor as a condition in salvation; and both of these ideas 
the scripture condemns. That works is a condition in neither, read Ephe- 
sians, ii, chap. 10th verse: "For we are his workmanship, created in Christ 
Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should 
walk in them." Then if we are God's workmanship, surely it is he that 
makes and creates us to goqd works, and not of ourselves; that we are thus 
prepared to do good works, is the effect of God's before ordaining onto it, 
read 8lh and 9th verses of same chapter: "By grace are ye saved, through 
faith, and not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of works, lest any 
man should boast." Here salvation is said to be of grace, or gift of God, 
and works is denied of having any part; and the same reason is assigned 
by Paul, lest men should boast. Then the basis of the plan of salvation is 
fixed on grace through faith, and cuts off works, to exclude boasting from 
the church of God, and heaven itself; for it is a cursed proud principle that 
cannot enter the gates of heaven. Read 2d Timothy: "Saved and called, 
not according to works. " Read Titus, iii. chap. 5th verse: "Not by 
works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy 
he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy 
Ghost." This text is plain, and puts the matter beyond all doubt, that 
works is no condition in salvation; not even works of righteousness which 
we do; but that God saves us by his mercy on a sinner, without regard to 
his works of righteousness; and the way he does so, is shewn in the text, 
by the renewing of the Holy Ghost. So then if works is not a condition 
in salvation, it can't be in election; because the scriptures say, they were 
chosen to salvation; then of course, if chosen unto salvation, works of righ- 
teousness were not considered as a qualification in that choice. Nor does 
this doctrine of unconditional election and salvation, do away nor destroys 
the utility, importance, nor necessity of good works, of which you know 
our limits will not now permit us to discuss; these remarks so far as we 
have gone by scripture, we submit to your consideration, as full proof in. 
the support of this third article; referring you to the scriptures, the whole 
drift of which wjlj prove this article, and substantiate the doctrine therein 
contained we fully believe; hoping also that you will diligently search the 
scriptures, like the noble Bereans, to see if these things are so, and not be 
led away with our reasonings, and any spirit that may seduce you other- 
wise. And above all we would caution you of bending the scriptures to 
fit your reasonings or opinions; but form your opinion and decide from 



(4 

what the scripture expressly says, and not from other men's reasonings oa 
them; while we will offer you some additional evidences in support of thrs 
article, of eternal and unconditional election. It is said, "that the natural 
man receiveth not the things of the spirit, neither indeed can he know 
them" — this is a proof that this kind of election is a truth, and a doctrine 
of the spirit; for if you will make election conditional, or to rest on a fore- 
sight of good works, then the natural man will receive it as a true doctrine 
and one that he knows something about, because he knows the condition;; 
unconditional election he can't receive, and why, because he cannot see 
iio'.v God can be just, and choose some to everlasting life, and not others; 
nor can he see or receive that doctrine that saves sinners without works, 
this is too high a reach for his reason, and so only discerned by those that 
tiave the spirit; and so this proves that our kind of election is right and a 
truth of God's spirit, because natural men can*t receive it as we hold it. 
For proof of election, first of Christ being chosen of God to be the Saviour 
•of the world, read Psalms, lxxXix. chap. 19th Verse: "Then thou speaketh 
in vision to thy Holy One, and saidst I have laid help upon one that, is 
mighty, I have exalted one chosen out of the people." Here 'the help laid 
on one, means the humanity of Christ, laid on, or united to his divine, na- 
ture, and therefore he is the chosen of God, from among the people. Read 
Isaiah, xlii. chap. 1st verse: "Behold my servant whom 1 uphold, mine 
elect," &c. Read Matthew, xii chap. 18th verse: "Behold my servant 
whom 1 have chosen, my beloved in whom my soul is well pleased, I will 
put my spirit upon him and he shall shew judgment to the Gentiles." A 
plenty more. Of the election of sinners to everlasting life, read the verses 
already quoted; also, read Titus, i. chap. 1st verse: "According to the 
faith of God's elect, which God that cannot lie, promised before the world 
began." Nothing can be plainer to him that will not shut his eyes — it is 
folly to say more by way of argument. Read for the elect's sake, "elect 
long enjoy," "deceive the very elect," "gather his elect," "avenge his 
elect," "God's elect," "as the elect of God," "for the elect's sake," "elect 
lady," elect sister," "the church elect," "election of grace," "as touching 
election," "your election sure," &c. &c. &c. besides the many places 
where God is said to choose, or hath chosen his people, and that to ever- 
lasting life; and he that denies this third article, might as well deny the bi- 
ble at once, and indeed he would do so, if his popularity was not at stake, 
this he knows the world will not at present bear; therefore he must hold 
some truth, but not the whole truth. If man is the first to choose, then 
God is dependent on the choice of man. 

With regard to elect angels it is useless to say much, because this is not, 
we suppose, the ground of your objections to the third article. Read I 
Timothy, v. chap. 21st verse: "I charge thee before God, and the Lord 
Je.us Christ, and the elect angels," &c. Now in reading the scriptures 
you will find God gave a command to the angels, when he brought in his 
first begotten in the world saying, "let all the angels of God worship 
him." Every angel, therefore, that by the revelation of God saw through 
tru veil of his humanity, and worshipped Christ as God, was an elect angel, 
and the rest saw not, and so kept not their first estate, but fell into ever- 
lasting darkness; so, equally so, every sinner that is brought to see thro' 
the mystery of God in flesh, is an elect sinner, and the rest are blinded, as 
the scriptures have said. Then we shall say, that our views of election 
are right, wherein God as an eternal, unchangeable, wise, good, gracious 



15 

sovereign, to manifest his glory and the glory of his grace, on the vessels 
of mercy, did from or in eternity foreknow, and forechoose to everlasting 
life and salvation, some particular sinners among the mass of mankind, not 
belter in themselves than others, and preappointed and ordained them to 
obtain salvation, and everlasting life, without regarding any foreseen good- 
ness, whether moral or natural, as being the cause why God chose them; 
but merely of his love, mercy and grace, according to the good pleasure, 
©f ms own will, chose them in Christ in eternity; and and also gave them 
grace in him, to give to them in the fulness of time, to perfect and com- 
plete their final salvuion and glorification; And to bring about this grand 
end, he equally chose Christ in eternity to be the Saviour of this chospn 
people; and in his wise and unchangeable counsel and decree, fixed as firm 
as the pillars of heaven? the mediation of Christ, effectual calling of those 
sinners to him, and a union with him by that spirit, an interest in him, and 
as partakers of his fulness, for sanctification, righteousness, and redemption, 
and eternal glorification. A host of scriptures will prove tbese remarks. 

If we refer to the history of the church, in any and ail ages, we have 
the ffejt evidence in our favor, and that from all the writers for the first 
320 y> rs after Christ, that this doctrine of election was held by the 
church, as a sacred tenet of the Christian faith, all along through the church 
of Rome, and under all her afflicting curses there were thousands holding 
this doctrine as sacred, of which we have not time to speak. When f he 
High Church of England departed from the Church of Rome, you will find 
it in her creed: in Calvin's, Luther's, and all. the rest of the reformers;, 
if you come to New England you will find this was one of the doctrines 
of the reformation, and the same in substance among all those as we hold it. 
And you will further find, that the reformed churches in all ages, have 
condemned election, in any other form, than as we hold it; although the 
Roman Church, and the Arminian have differed from us, and do now dif- 
fer, we can prove the church held this doctrine before their* births, as we 
hold it; for the scriptures shew that the apostles held it so. 

Dear brethren, we have long regirded you as brethren, and as firm be- 
lievers of this heavenly ductrine; and how is it, that your heads and hearts* 
have so soon become turned away from the truth? We wish to lay before, 
you, some passages of scripture for your consideration, and see if they do 
not exactly apply to your case. Read 2 Peler, i. chap, 2d verse: "But 
there were false prophets among the people, even as there shall be false; 
teachers among you, (you the gospel church,) who privily shall bring in 
damnable heresies, even denying the Lord that bought them, and bring' 
upon themselves swift destruction; (verse 2d) and many shall follow their 
pernicious ways, by reason of whom the way of truth shall be evil spoken 
of. " Read again, Acts x:x. chap. 29th verse: "For this know, thai after 
my departing, shall grievous wolves enter in among you, not sparing the 
flock; (verse 30th) also of yourown selves, shall men arise speaking per- 
verse things, to draw away disciples after them." For a man to exert all. 
his force, to draw away sinners from their sins, and disciple them to Christ,, 
is highly honorable; but for a man to use all his force to disciple men to an 
opinion, to draw away men from churches, or from one opinion to an- 
other, is the reverse. Read 1 Timothy, iv. chap. 1st verse: "Now the spi- 
rit speaketh expressly that in the latter times some shall depart from the 
faith, giving heed to seducing spirits and doctrines of devils." Were you* 
right first in your faith, brethren, when you hefd taaod preached this at if-- 



!6 

cle, and had no exception to it? If so, are you sure you are right now? 
Is there not as good reason, and more reason for you now to suspect you 
are wrong, thar* there was in your first faith? You have changed once, 
you may change again. When a ship gets under a contrary wind, it is 
hard to stop her; one wrong step forces another on you, until down you 
go. Set your hearts towards the king's highway, enquire for the good 
old way, and walk therein; ask thy fathers and they will tell thee, the way 
of faith in ancient times; and let not the speculations of a few men put you 
out of your heads, and overthrow your faith, and ye be shipwrecked, or 
make shipwreck of your faith. Paul says: "Mark those that cause divi^ 
sions among you; (and why?) for such serve not our Lord Jesus Christ, 
but their own belly, and by good words and fair speeches deceive the 
hearts of the simple;'' or those that can't discern their cunning, to prose- 
lyte and lead away a train of followers to their pernicious ways or tenets, 
for their own applause and popularity — and in the eyes of whom do those 
dividers become popular? Not in the eyes of God's past churches, nor in 
the eyes of the sound in faith in the present day; but they shall proceed no 
farther than God intends should be, for the good of his spiritual Israel; but 
like ^Jannes and Iambres," shall be made manifest to the present and fu- 
ture ages of the church, to be impostors; for we have this seal, ''the Lord 
knoweth them that are his." We marvel, brethren, at some of you, who 
have stood firm in this faith so long, that you, more especially you, should 
be be so easily carried away by the airy speculations of other men's heads. 
Stop and pause, fly to the scriptures and your knees for information, for 
there are millions against your opinions in heaven and on earth; be en- 
treated from the welfare we wish you, and from the love that has so long« 
subsisted between us, and the truth of the word of God, to think seriously 
and deliberately and cautiously what you are a doing, then after all this 
think, for yourselves, and he to yourselves; for if you give up this article 
as an untruth, the bond of union that has so long solaced us, is broken, no 
more to be mended, until you shall return, confessing your error, and that 
this third article is a truth, a revealed truth, a God's truth, and an eternal 
and glorious blessed truth, of comfort to the souls of all God's dear chil- 
dren. We wish you may see your error before too late. Farewell. 



BIOGRAPHY OF 

ESMiSlt GRSSSStf €aiEOWa^. 

Elder Green Carrowan was born July 27th, A. D. 1778, of poor but 
respectable parents. He was a very intelligent boy, but remarkably wild, 
which many times rendered his father very unhappy, for his father was a-** 
preacher of the United Baptist order, and a very pious man — his name was 
William Carrowan, who formerly had had the pastoral care of the church 
on Mattamuskeet, in Hyde county, N. C. His son Green, from the best 
information I can get, was about as profane a man as ever was raised in 
Hyde county. I before observed he was a great grief to his father, but it 
seemed he had something rather to console him before his death. A few 
days before he died he observed to his negro man — Jim, said the old man, 
what do you think of my poor boy, Green? Oh massy, said Jim, I don't 
know. The reply from the master was — Jim, you'll find if you live, a 
great alteration in that young lad in a short time. What evidence the old 
man had for il, is unknown to us, but so it was, the prediction came to 



pass in about two years after the old man's death. But to give you a fur- 
ther account of the singular turn of this boy, though such a horrid profane 
child generally, vet he was a great mimic of religion and also of preaching, 
si When his father would attend his stated meetings, his son Green, it is 
ujsaid, would go with him, and while the father would be in the house prea- 
ching, Green would have a parcel of young people wiih him, preaching 
to them, making use of the same motions and gestures of body that the fa- 
ther did. And on one time in particular, when the old man was exercising 
in the house near a window, where his son could have a full view of him 
while preaching, Green took his pulpit, which was a bye-stand— -the old 
man when he entered fully into the merits of his subject was very much, 
animated, so that he made a great motion of body; Green trying Jo follow 
suit and copy after the old man, making use of toe same words the father 
did, and as loud as he dare do, not observing the tottering condition of his 
pulpit, while in strong motion the bye-stand upset, and gave him a> severe 
fall; he has often said, he really thought his neck was broken at first. In 
his vicinity there was a great revival of the Methodists —young Green be^ 
came the head of a class, which he influenced to join him; these with oth- 
er vain pleasures seemed to be his pursuit, until the kindness and love of 
God our Saviour appeared, not by works of righteousness which he had 
jdone, the Lord happily arrested him in the 2Sth year of his age. His con- 
viction was very pungent, but his deliverance was very clearly manifest- 
ed; his call both to the fellowship of the saints and that to the ministry wa« 
clearly exhibited. He joined the Baptist church in Hyde county, and was 
baptised bv John Bowes; and soon commenced in the ministry, as a co- 
worker with Elder Bowen, who had lately moved to Maltamuskeet. His 
preaching was greatly approved by the churches — he was what might be 
called a great preacher from the first start; he was considered a man of great 
natural talents and profound knowledge in the Holy Scriptures; his ser- 
mons were not those of an orator, naturally speaking, but well stored with 
scripture arguments, such as are rarely surpassed by any; he made a bold 
but humble appearance in the pulpit, and exhibited very clear views in the 
doctrine of the gospel; he would display great ingenuity in communicating 
his ideas through certain metaphors, or cramp observations, which some- 
times would excite laughter in the irreligious, and would be apt to make 
the most severe Christian smile; some have tho't him blameable for preach- 
ing in this vvay, supposing he advanced the ludicrous style too far; be that 
as it may, he always appeared to close such subjects with solemnity; thro' 
this means he often would have his congregations laughing, and soon after 
have them crying. Great were the disadvantages which Elder Carro wan 
labored under, and which as is tho't by many, prevented him from equal- 
ling if not surpassing any of his profession that ever yet arose — his father 
lived and he was brought up in that part of Hyde county, which was at 
the time of his infancy, as obscure and unenlightened section of country as 
probably any where to be found; and being poor, he received but a small 
share of education; it was with difficulty that he could read the Holy Scrip- 
tures with correctness; he was a very industrious man, and hard labor was 
his lot from his infancy to his death. 

In the year of 1811, he took the care of the church of South Mattamuskeet, and 
served them in that capacity until the year of 1322, when he left them and mov- 
ed over on the south side of Pamlico Sound, close on between Goose and Oyster 
Creeks; he in a short time raised a church on that side, in Beaufort county, of 
Which, he had the pastoral care, and so continued until his death; yet aotwith- 



18 

standing his removal, he attended his old church of So. Mattatnuskeet quarterly, 
and had the oversight of her as her occasional pastor. 

Miere blight be many interesting and amusing anecdotes related of this ingeni- 
ous man, could the materials be come at with correctness; but to hand down to 
the public mere hearsay or flighty reports, we feel some degree of caution. A- 
mong the many, I give you the following— when Elder Carrowan first began to be 
a popular preacher, he visited the church on Core Sound, Hunting Quarters— I 
previous to his going over, two Methodist preachers had been there, and picked 
up into their class a considerable number, who when Elder Carrowan went over, 
and they heard him paint out to them their experience, and proved to them be- 
lieving baptism by the scriptures, their honest hearts compelled them to go into 
the water and they were by Elder Carrowan baptised. - The Methodists alluded 
to, lived in Newbern, and these disciples of theirs (as they thought) the news of 
their being baptised soon reached them, and it seemed to vex their righteous 
souls, at what they considered such unlawful deeds. A short time after two 
young men from Hunting Quarters being at Newbern, and these preachers hear- 
ing of Elder Carrowan's next appointment, hired the young men to come after 
them, in order as they said to confute the babbler and send him off home; and 
•withal to defend their flock, inasmuch as they looked upon themselves sec for the 
defence of what they called the gospel, They agreed to give each man ten dol- 
lars. Accordingly the young men performed their part of the contract; they had 
them there on the day of Elder Carrowan's appointment, and they heard him- 
preach— -the gospel system, both as to doctrine and ordinance, was so well authen- 
ticated and proven by the scriptures, that the man whose lot it was to follow him, 
acknowledged that according to the present standing of the scriptures, that Car- 
rowan's sermon could not be denied; but he assured them that all the scriptures 
were not correctly translated from the original Greek. He told them there was- 
a brother of his in Newbern, who could correct ninety-five passages, and he him- 
self could correct fifteen or twenty. There was an old Baptist sitting under him,, 
■who not being acquainted with hearing the Holy Scriptures thus treated, raised 
up his head and looked him in the face, and instead of saying you are an emissary 
of ths devil, said you are an advisary of the devil; if the people are a mind to 
hear you, they can do so, but I shall go out. The old man got up and the people- 
followed him into the yard, leaving the two Methodist preachers by themselves, 
who having nobody to preach to, soon followed the crowd. The young hirelings 
were not slack concerning their promises: one of them accosted one of the prea- 
chers, saying, pay me the ten dollars; which like an honest man he pulled out 
and paid him — the other young man went to the other preacher and demanded 
his payment, which he refused and said it was not due; why? says the young man;: 
the reply was, I've had no chance; well but, said the young man, I've done what I 
promised to do, and you shall pay me or I'll warrant you, for I did'nt agree to give 
you any chance to confound him;.. I was only to help fetch you here which I have 
done, and if you do not pay me I will warrant you; but the people persuaded the 
young man out of the notion of warranting, saying if. he was so mean, as not to 
pay it, let him off so. This was all the beating poor Carrowan got, the preachers 
going off leaving their supposed flock willing captives to Baptist principles, and 
one of their hirelings without his money. One acted the pai t of a punctual man,, 
but his bad cause made him appear, as is said of an old proverb, a fool and his mo- 
ney soon parted — while the other showed the principles of malice and roguishness.. 

Elder Carrowan was twice married — liis first wife was a 
daughter of Foster Jarvis, on Swanquarter; by her he had sev- 
en children, six of wham were alive at his death. His second, 
was a daughter of Henry Carrow, on Mattatnuskeet Lake — by 
her he had nine children, eight of them were alive at his death. 
He was a man of a strong constitution and enjoyed a great por- 
tion of health, until about two years before his death, notwith- 
standing a large helpless and expensive family, who were most- 
ly dependant on his bodily labor for support. Yet while in 
health up to his last sickness, he continued to travel and preach 



jteg 



lllll! 



extensive tours, visiting tho sister churches in the adjacent 
;ounties over a large portion of the State of Norih Carolina, 
especially the southern part on the sea-board. He was much 
baiter qualified as a gospel preacher than a disciplinarian; and 

^ it has been said by many, that his qualifications were such as 
would have justified him in travelling and preaching all the 

! :ime; as they thought he filled up this place better, than to take 
;he pastoral care. He generally had large and attentive con- 
gregations in his own neighborhood, and his preaching made a 
?reat noise abroad, so that it was a rare case but that he had a 
full congregation wherever he went. In his private conversa- 
tion he was very entertaining and agreeable; those who heard 
him might with propriety have said, this man is in earnest, he 
believes what he says and says what he believes; and those 
who dissented from him in opinion, were still pleased with 
hearing him, for they knew his sincerity and believed him to 
be a man of God. In his first religious exercises he was led to 
dig deep into his own heart, where he found such opposition 
and rebellion, that when he obtained pardon, he attributed it to 
sovereign grace alone; which sentiment, so interwoven in his 
soul, he ever proclaimed aloud to a dying world. Nothing ap- 
peared to be more disgustful to his mind, than to hear works 
and grace together/as the foundation of a sinner's hope. To 
hold forth the Lamb of God as a piece of a Saviour, or to con- 
sider the self exertions of a natural man, to be the way unto 
Christ, the true and only way, were extremely displeasing to 
that soul of his, which delighted so much in proclaiming eter- 
nal love, redeeming blood, and matchless grace. 

He was a great light or luminary among the Baptists — how 
many mourners he has comforted, and from their weeping eyes 
he has wiped t'.ie tears away; how many careless and unconcer- 
ned sinners he has been the means of awakening; and how ma- 
ny wavering minds he has established; and to how many re- 
penting sinners his words have administered peace and conso- 
lation, can be fully known only at the^reat day. It maybe 
truly said, a great man has fallen in Israel. In the summer of 
1831, he was taken with a fever, which for a short time confi- 
ned him to his bed; when the fever abated it was hoped and be- 
lieved that it was the ague and fever, which is so common in 
the low sickly country; his health having so much improved, he 
attended the Kehukee Association, held at Flat Swamp meet- 
ing house, Pitt county. And on Sunday, it being the first Sun- 
day of October, 1831, he was appointed to preach on the stage, 
which appointment he filled and preached from Joshua, vii. 
chap, and part of 25th verse: "And Joshua said, why hast thou 



i ; ;'i 



2b 

troubled us; the Lord shall trouble thee this? day " It was am 
awakening and edifying discourse* and which proved to be his 
last. From (his day lie began to grow worse, and with much 
difficulty it was that lie was enabled to reach home; and it was 
soon discovered that his sickness had changed to a dropsical 
nature, of which he never recovered. During his last sickness 
his whole time appeared to be employed in expounding the 
scriptures to his brethren and friends who visited him, exhort- 
ing them to stand fast in the faith and to earnestly contend for 
the faith once delivered to the saints; and at the same time re- 
joiced that he was able to bear his afflictions with patience and 
fortitude, believing that he should shortly realize the heavenly E S J ( 
promises of the Lord. On the first Saturday and Sunday be- 1 j^H; 
fore, in December, while Elder Carrowan was on his death .^ 
bed, it being the time of the Mattainuskeet church quarterly j^a 
meeting, at which time he was melted down with love and 
praise to the giver of all good, for his inestimable goodness 
and kindness in sparing him to witness the ordination of his 
brother George W. Caurowan, and also that of Asa Sawyer, yt,, 
respecting which he thus expressed himself: "That I want 
words and a heart of more thankfulness to praise my kind Re- 
deemer, for sparing me to see him raise up one (even my bro^ |L| 
the. in, t$.%. flesh) to go in and out before my old churdh, which 
1 have had the care of so long; that he is so kind before I 
depart, that he has already filled the vacancy my death will oc^ 
casion." At which time a visiting brother in the ministry en- 
quired of him t-he state of his mind, also respecting his doctri- 
nal tenets, and asked him, if he regretted his past life being 
spent in proclaiming the truths of the doctrine of predestina- 
tion and election; the effectual calling; the saints' final perse- 
verance, &c &c. to which he replied, Those glorious doc- 
trines were taught me of the Lord in the 28th year of my age, j 
and that he had no doubt but they would be sacred in his latest 
hours; but he had to regret that he had been compelled to 
waste so much of his precious time in laboring to provide ne- 
cessaries for the support of his family; and thereby had failed 
as fully and completely in fulfilling that great command given 
him of the Lord, namely, "Preach my gospel to every crea- 
ture" — but if it was the will of God, again to restore him to 
health, that he did intend the balance of his days should be 
spent in the service of the Lord, declaring to the world salva- 
tion thro' the merits and suffering of a dying, risen Redeemer. 

This great man of God conquered the last enemy, and as- 
cended to that rest, that remainethfor the people of God, on the 
31st day of January, 1882, aged 53 years, 6 months and 4 days. 



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BIOGRAPHY OF 

EIiBBB J0I1M EOWE1. 

Elder Bowen was born January 3d, 1774, in Beaufort conn* 
y, N. C. of poor but respectable parents. His father's name 
vas John Bowen, who was born and raised on Town Greek, 
3eaufort county, whose occupation was that of a cart wheel- 
wright— his trade or calling was most assiduously followed by 
urn and his son. Young John Bowen was a very worthy 
outh, advocating always by precept and example the noble 
>rinciples of honesty and industry — -he was very moral in his 
fe and conversation — his parents were strict Episcopalians, 
ind brought up their children in the rites and ceremonies of 
hat church, but no reason to believe that they were acquaint- 
d with a work of grace in the heart — 'their religion tolerated 
:ivil amusements, such as dancing, &c. and John from his 
fouth was with this kind of sport greatly delighted, and was for 
several years himself a fidler; and while he pursued these things 
lie had no concern about the salvation of his own soul, suppos- 
ing that to be safe, and all he thought necessary was strictly to 
attend to the outer forms of his then favorite Church of Eng* 
land, But it was pleasing to God for the gospel of his free 
grace to be preached in his vicinity, and it was sounded with 
that power which brought him to doubt his former religion* 
and those innocent amusements admired so much by some re* 
ligious professors, he found to be a sword or thorn to his heart, 
making a wound and causing a pain which he by all his refor- 
mations could not cure — but notwithstanding his sin, guilt and 
condemnation, which resulted from the violation of a pure law 
which he had broken, which unsheathed the glittering sword 
of justice threatening immediate death — but when faith present- 
ed a dying Saviour to his view, he was brought to see the jus- 
tice of God in his soul's salvation, by which means he rejoiced 
in God his Saviour. From the time of his conversion he nev- 
erwould allow his children to dance — on his being reminded of 
his formerly doing so, the reply would be, yes in my youth and 
ignorance 1 did so, but I have seen the time 1 had to mourn on 
the account of it. He became a member of the Baptist Church 
at Marattock, in September, 1802, in Washington county, 



▼ 



sir 



which was under the pastoral care of Elder Amariah Biggs; in pi 
the summer of 1804. he was set apart for the administration ol 
gospel ordinances, by prayer and fasting. His preaching was 
much approved by the churches. He married as early as 179& 
the daughter of Thomas Garrett, of Martin county— her name 
is Mary, by whom he had at his death nine children-— three 
sons and six daughters. The increase of his family and thenlpv 
helpless situation, called his attention so much at dome, tha| 
he appeared to labor under great disadvantage in the ministry 
for his province was to work hard all the time he was at home,]jwai) 
and attend his stated meetings on Saturday and Sunday. Aned 
kind Providence directed his way down on Mattamuskeet Lake 
where we believe about the year 1805 or 6, he moved with his ers 
family; where we are satisfied he was a blessing in the hands o( s 
God to many souls. The church at that place at his remova 
was reduced to a very low ebb, which soon recovered undel 
his ministry. He was a man of unshaken resolution, a stricitfrt 
republican in his principles, a very sentimental man through; fcor 
all his life — his peculiar views in natural affairs, political, do 
mestic or religious, he would defend with considerable energy. 
In religious matters he was a predestinarian, believing salva 
tion to be by grace, without the deeds of the law — the right-joml 
eousness of Christ imputed to us by faith, and ga notification by 
his blood. The dead state we are all in by nature, he believed 
cut us short of all power in doing any thing in whole or in par! 
of our salvation; this lead him so highly to espouse the effectu- 
al call and the saints final perseverance; these are articles^ 
which he held dear to his soul, but he was not so pointed a|wi\ 
preacher as some of bis brethren in the ministry; he seemed to 
border more, on a work of grace to the soul. It was thought 
by the brethren of his acquaintance, that he was at times a 
great experimental preacher, and on experimental and practi-| t 
cal godliness he mostly dealt. The church at Mattamuskeet, 
as before hinted, in her low condition she was in need of such 
a man; her condition was like EzekiePs vision of the dry bones^ 
and God was able to perfect his means in bringing a revival in 
the Mattamuskeet church through Br. Bowen, as he was in E- 
zekiel's time in causing a great army to stand up. He preach 
ep and baptised many, and among the rest Elder Green Car- 
rowan, who professed to have been converted before he saw 
Elder Bowen — he has expressed himself something like this, 
that Br. Bowen had been made to him, like Peter was to Corf||f a8 
nelius, to tell him what he ought to do; under his preaching he 
learnt baptism to be a believer's duty, and accordingly he was 
baptised by Elder Bowen, and for the term of three or four 



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ears never were brethren more united in being workers toge- 
ther as fellow laborers. Soon after Elder Carrowan's hap- 
Ism, he commenced in the ministry as a co-worker with Elder 
>qwen — the church appeared to be fully in the gospel chariot, 
idmg with truth and meekness at the side of her heavenly 
ridegroom, in her full pomp of grace and glory — her watch- 
len were zealous in crying aloud, manifesting a great love and 
eal for Zion's welfare. About this time a happy revival with- 
i her bounds took place, that is, on Mattamuskeet Lake, 
•wanquarter, and the island of Currituck — the church increa- 
ed to nearly two hundred members. The church in Carter- 
t county, including Core Sound, Cedar Island, Hunting Quar- 
3rs, Portsmouth, North River, and the Straits, were benefited 
y their labors. The church of Mattamuskeet, in Hyde coun- 
y, had formerly met on the north side of the Lake, but as she 
/as composed of members who were dispersed over a large 
art of the county, it was thought best to divide the church, and 
ccordingly in the year 1811 it was done, and the church on 
be south side of the Lake, made choice of Elder Carrowan 
} be their pastor, after he was set apart by a presbytery of 
linisters for that purpose, and Elder Bowen retained his pas- 
oral function of the church on the north side. Things went on 
i harmony but for a little while — here we can but drop a tear 
f sympathy, and cry with one of old, "What is manl" — the en- 
my took the advantage of sowing the seeds of discord between 
icsc ministers, which created a wound that never got healed. 
Hie unhappy division between those ministers was thought by 
lany to result from one William Ashley, (at that time a mem- 
er of the church,) who took a violent stand on one part against 
h<^ other, and so continued until such time as he saw an oppor- 
unity of feathering his own nest, whereby shewing his cloven 
oot, and proving he was not a friend to either. It is certain: 
his unhappy affair was food for the devil, for the writer of this 
iece has often been at their public meetings, where the mem- 
bers would meet and instead of talking that which might tend 
o edify one another, this unhappy division would be the main 
opio of conversation, to the great grief of pious and godly 
ouls. The dispute ran so high that there were a number 
f Bowen men, and a number of Carrowan men. Things thus 
ontinued until the fall of 1814, when Br. Bowen. moved his 
mily into a settlement called Long Acre, near his father in 
Vashington county, but still continued to attend t'oe north side 
hurch at their quarterly meetings — also the chur ches of north 
)eep Creek, and Blount's Creek enjoyed some 'benefits of \h 
linisterial labors, He departed this life about the 1st of Au- 



gust, 1815, after a short but painful illness. Wnile on h 
death bed he was visited by a brother, who enquired of hit 
how he did — his reply was, rough and thorny is the way, bl 
sweet will be the issue; from which we can justly infer, he wa 
still strong in the faith, and stedfastly believed a crown of nev 
er fading glory was laid up for him in heaven above, Blessei 
are they who die in the Lord, &c. We hope his happy soul i 
far beyond the reach of sorrow. His widow is still alive am 
resides on the plantation which he last occupied. 



J ,a 
Fret Press— Tar boro' N. 0. ! k 

c 




MINUTES 



OF THE 



Kehukee Baptist Association, 

HOLDEN AT THE 

JV^Sfl COUNTY, JV. C. 

The 5th, 6th, and 7th days of October, 1833. 



SATURDAY, October 5th, 1833. 

1. The Introductory Sermon (agreeably to appointment,) 
was delivered by Elder William Hyman,from Acts, xxii. chap. 
1st verse: "Men, brethren and fathers, hear ye my defence, 
which I make now unto you." 

2. The Association then convening and being opened with 
prayer by Elder Joseph Biggs, then proceeded to choose El- 
ier William Hyman Moderator, and Elder Joseph Biggs 
Clerk, who called to his assistance Brother Joseph D. Biggs, 

3. Brethren in the ministry (present) from sister Associa- 
tions (of ihe same faith and order with us) were invited to seats, 
when Elders Philemon Bennett, Mark Bennett, Thomas Du- 
pree, Benjamin Bynum, Burrel Temple, and Eli Holland, seat- 
ed themselves. 

4. Letters from thirty-three Churches were read, and their 
representation stated in the table of Churches. 

5. Letters of correspondence from sister Associations were 
called for, when Elder Thomas Dupree, from the Contentnea 
Association, handed in sundry copies of their last Minutes? 



NAMES OF CHURCHES 

and Counties where 
situated. 



1. Baregrass, Martin, — 

2. Blunt' s Creek, Beaufort, - 

3. Coevjockf Currituck, 

4. Conoho, Martin, — 

5. Coneloe Edgecombe, — 

6. Concord, Washington, 

7. Cross Roads, Edgecombe 

8. Cedar Island, Carteret, - 
9 D&p Creek Halifax.— 

10 Falls Tar River Nash,- 

11 Fiat Swamp Pitv. 

12 Frying Pan, Tyrrell, — 
23 Goose Creek, Beaufort, - 

14. Great Swamp, Pitt, — 

15. Hunting Quarters, Car- 

ier<»t, — f 

16. Kthukee, Halifax, — 

17. Lawrence's M H. Edge- 

nofiabe, 

18. Little Alligator, Tyrrell - 

19. Moratlock, Washin'n, — 
20 N^rlh Creek, Beaufort, 

21. No.Mattamuskeet, Hydef 

22. Old Ford, Beaufort, — 
23 Picox M II Martin, — 
24. PoweVs Point, Curri- 
tuck, — 

'23. Pungo, Benufort, — 

26. Scuppernong Tyrrell, — 

27. So.Matlamuskeet, Hyde, 

28. Skewarkey, Martin, 

29. Smithwick's Creek, Martin 

SO. Sound Side, Tyrrell, — 

31 Spring Green, Martin, — 

32 Tarborough, Edgeco'e, - 

33 Washington, Beaufort, — 
34, White Plains, Beaufort, 

35 Williams' M. H. Edge* 
combe, — 

Total, 



CO S3 blft 

MINISTERS fy DELEGATES. I'^^il 

a.; » a*' 2 



Daniel Biggs, Abraham Peal, 
Lodovvick Reddit,* Robe; t Tripp,* 
SAMUEL TATUM,* FOSTER 

JARVIS* - - - 

John Bryan, James M*vo, « 
John H Danif !, William Thigpen, 
iMICAJAH AMBROSE, Daniel 

! Clifton, 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Joseph J. 

Pippen, 
George Styron,* Thos. Robrrtson, 
William Whitehead, 
Jameg S. Battle, Joseph S. Battle, 
LUKE WARD, Edmund Andrews, 
JOHN R!C?ARDSO; ,* 
Dai-il Lewis, James Potter, 
WiliisFlemming,*HarLiyWbichard, 



John Shields,* Turner Brewer, 
JOSHUA LAWRENCE, Arthur 

Parker, • 

Edward Payne,* Joseph Evans,* 
Duant Mizeil. Jacob Wilkinson, 
LEMU^ L ROSS, Henr* Blount, 

asa Lawyer," 

Mercer D Wilson, J D Harrington, 
Joshua R obei tson,* James Hinson* 

Benjamin Evans,* James Melson,* 
Job.) R. Davis, J. G Everitt, 
JOSEPH BARNES,* 
GEORGE W. C4RR0WAN* R 

M.G Moore, « 
JOSEPH BIGGS, Joseph D. Biggs, 
M1CAJAH PERRY, HUMPH- 

REY STALLINGS, 
G. H Alexander, Zebulon Kemp, 
Wm. Gray, Stft nhen Outterbriiige, 
Ely Porter, Ccffield King, 
Levin Wallace. Jesse Allan, 
MILES EVERITT,* Wm. Smaw, 

Arnet Waters, •- 
David Bradley, <• - . 



2 8 



to tc 



2 1 



1 
3 

l|2 
2 



2|1 



1 

4 48 56 5 



NOl'E. Pastors of Churches, and other ordained ministers, are in small CAP1 I A*. a; un< 
ordained Minisiers in italics; those marked thus, * were no! present: ti ni Churches marked 
thus, t we received no intelligence, in that case their number stands as last year; Dashes — 
deaoie no Pastors; the last column shows the contributions from the Churches to the Associa- 
tion fund . 



setting forth his appointment, and Elder Benjamin Bynurn's, 
as messengers to this Association — the Minutes were thankful* 
ly received. 

Elder Eli Holland, from the Little River Association, also 
handed in sundry copies of their Minutes, which set forth his 
appointment to this Association, which were also thankfully re- 
ceived. 



3 

6. A petitionary letter, from a church lately constituted on 
Cedar Island, in Carteret county, fur membership in this body, 
w is handed in by their messengers, and upon information of 
th* j ir faith and order satisfactory, ihey were received a 
Member of this body and manifested in due form. 

7. The following committees were appointed, (viz:) Eld<-*ra 
Thomas Dupree, Joshua Lawrence, Joseph Rijgjg** and 'ho 
writer to examine the Circular Letter. Brethren James S. 
B »ule and Joseph J. Pippen/on finance. Brother Joseph D. 
Bigg? to prepare a letter to the Conlenitrie * Association. Bro. 
Ri< hard VI. G. Moore, to write to the Lutle River Association. 
All to report on Monday next. 

8 Elders Joshua Lawrence, Burrel Temple, and Thomas 
Dupree, were requested, (by private ballot,) to occupy the 
sta^e in preaching on the morrow. Divine service to com- 
mence at 10$ o'clock, A. M 

9 Such queries as were now ready, and such resolutions as 
were drawn up, were read, and referred until Monday. 

10 Resolved, that our next Association be held at Cross 
Rim (is Meeting House, Edgecombe county, jo commence Sat- 
urday before the first Sunday in October, 1834, at 11 o'clock, 
A. M. and that Elder George W. Carrowan be requested to 
deliver an introductory Sermon to that <Association; and in case 
of failure, Elder Joseph Bi^gs is requested to do the same. 

The Association was then adjourned, until Monday next 9 
o'clock, A. M. with prayer, by Elder Mark Bennett. 

SUNDAY, October 6th, 1833. 
The brethren appointed to the stage, met a large assembly 
of people, and proceeded in the following manner: Elder Bor- 
ol well Temple preached from 2 Corinthians, 2d chapter and 
part of the ll«h verse: "For we are not ignorant of his devices." 
Elder Joshua Lawrence preached from Isaiah, 54th chap, and 
5th verse: "For thy maker is thy husband; the Lord of host* is 
- his name; and thy redeemer the Holy One of Israel; th« God 
.J of the whole earth shall he be called." Elder Thomas Dupree 
closed by rehearsing his text: "How shall we escape if we ne- 
glect so great salvation" — and dismissed the assembly. We 
hope the labors of the day will not be lost; but after many days 
be gathered in. 

MONDAY, 7th October, 1 833. 
The Association having met, was opened with prayer by the 
Moderator, and proceeded to business. 
11. The Rules of this Association was read. 



4 

12. Bro. Joseph S. Battle was appointed on the committee 
of finance, in the place of Bro. Joseph J. Pippen, (who was in- 
disposed.) 

13. The committees appointed on Saturday last, were called 
on to report; the one to examine the Circular Letter, reported 
that no such letter had come to hand, and as they had not time 
to prepare one, recommend the one attached to these Minutes 
in lieu thereof; the same was read, and accepted as our letter | 
with some small omissions. 

The letter prepared to the Contentnea Association was han- 
in, read and approved, and signed by the Moderator and Clerk, 
and Elders Joshua Lawrence and Joseph Biggs appointed mes- 
sengers to bear the same. 

The letter prepared to the Little River Association was han- 
ded in, read and approved, and signed by the Moderator and 
Clerk, and Elders Luke Ward and Micajah Perry and Bro. 
William Thigpen appointed messengers to bear the same. 



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i 

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for 



The Committee on Finance reported, that they find in the hands 

of the Treasurer, at the close of last Association, the sum of $59 89 
Received in contributions from the churches at this Association, 43 S5 



Making, $103 67 
Paid Elder Joseph Biggs for transcribing the Minutes of last 

year, superintending the printing, copying one on our rec- * 

ords, and distributing them as heretofore, - $10 00 

Paying the Printer for 500 copies, r - 30 00 

40 00 

Leaving a balance in the hands of the Treasurer of $63 67 



The Association concurred with the report. 

14. Whereas the churches at Grindle Creek, Pitt county, 
and Tranter's Creek, Beaufort county, have neglected to repre- 
sent themselves in this Association by letters and delegates for 
some time, and as we are informed have discarded the Articles 
of Faith on which the Association was founded, and in which 
they were constituted and joined this body — therefore, Resol- 
ved, that the aforesaid churches be stricken from the list of ,y 
this Association, for their violation of their agreement to rep- 1 fd, 
resent themselves in this body, and for adopting and continu- j >m 
ing to advocate errors derogatory to the Christian faith. 

Resolved, that we disapprobate the conduct of a part that 
were members of the church at the Old Ford, in Beaufort 
county, and also part that were members of the church at 
Smithwick's Creek, in Martin county, in departing from the 
Articles that those churches adopted at their Constitution, on 
which they were received members of this body, and setting up 



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e 8 ind establishing nsw churches at said places, of another order, 
mder their former Constitution. 

15. The subject of the priming of the History of this Associ- 
ation, from its close as publish' d by Elders Burkitt and Road, 
n 1303, up to this time, was taken up, and found the subserip- 
;ions before this time not sufficient to jus.ify the work's being 

e 8 ione; therefore, in addition to the former subscriptions, a new 
mbscription was taken up in this body, which with the former 
ve think may justify the undertaking — therefore, Resolved, 
hat the same be done agreeably to former order, and it may 
le expected, that at next Association the work will be ready 
*or delivery. Resolved, that Elders Joshua Lawrence, Wil- 
iam Flyman, Luke Ward, and Brethren Thomas Bi#gs, Jo- 
;eph D. Biggs, and C. B. Hassell, be appointed a committee, 
o examine the work of the History to be collected and prepa- 
ed by Elder Joseph Biggs, or a majority of them previous to 
ts going to the press, and they are empowered to make such 
erasures, corrections, or additions, as they in their judgment 
nay think expedient. 

16. Resolved, that Elder Luke Ward be requested to pre- 
pare a Circular Letter for the next Association. 

17. Resolved, that Elder Joseph Biggs be requested to tran- 
?ct;ibe and prepare these Minutes for the press, have 500 copies 
)rinted, record one copy on our records, and distribute thenr 
o the churches and sister Associations with whom we corres- 
pond, as heretofore. 

The Association then adjourned with an exhortation by the 
Moderator, and prayer by Elder Joseph Biggs. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Moderator. 
JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk. 



CIRCULAR LETTER, 

Beloved JBrethren: The revolving wheels of time have rolled on the pe« 
'iod in which it is your right to expect our annual epistle. In consequence 
)f the failure of the Brother appointed to write our Circular for this year, 
permit us, therefore, to present the following one, which we have borrow- 
d from the Warwick Baptist Association, to your prayerful consideration^ 
n which you will see the absolute necessity of adhering strictly to the word 
)f God, as the all-sufficient and only infallible rule of faith and practice. 
iVe are persuaded better things of you, brethren, than to suppose, that this 
ubject will be viewed as either unimportant or uninteresting; since you 
lave as saints, and as churches, solemnly covenanted in the fear of the 
^ord, to adopt this as a fundamental point in your faith. Let us briefly 
onsider, first the sufficiency, and secondly, the infallibility of this divine 



6 

rule; third, the necessity of strictly adhering to it, as our rule of faith an 
practice. First, the sufficiency, and on this point in general terms, we arj [| 
aware, brethren, that you will all agree that there is no deficiency in thj 
Holy Book, (the Bible,) but we deem it of vital importance to the welfar 
of Z1011, the peace of Jerusalem, and to the advancement of the interest ( 
the churches of the saints, that we not only iii general terms, but with th 
most scrupulous exactness, listen to its dictates, laws, ordinances, exam 
pies, admonitions, &c. in all matters of faith and practice, in a religiou 
point of view. The great apostle hath informed us, that, "All scripture i 
given by inspiration of God, is profitable for doctriue, for reproof, for coi 
rection, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be per 
feet, thoroughly furnished unto all good works." 2 Timothy. 3d chap. *6t 
and 17th verges. Viewing this rule then, as emanating from the high au 
thority of God, it would amount to a base reflection upon his divine wis 
dom and goodness, for us who profess to be his disciples, either to aid tc 
or depart from, the rule that God has given us in his word; but we are no 
only to learn from the declaration of this text, that the scriptures are di 
vinely inspired, and consequently are infallible; but also, that they are pro 
liuble for all the purposes contemplated by their divine author. Now th, 
grand object is, that the man of God may be perfect thoroughly, (not par 
tialfy,) furnished unto all good works; while then from this divine repos'i 
fory of instruction, and fulness of preparation, the man of God is thorough T" 
ly furnished unto all good works, we conclude, (as a matter of course,,, 
first, that none who are men of God, will furnish themselves from any oth 
er quarter — and second, that no works can be good, in the estimation 
God, unless warranted by that blessed book. Again: the apostle tells u 
that; "The grace of God, that briugeth salvation, hath appeared to al 
men, teaching us (the saints) that denying all ungodliness, and world! 
lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly in this present world.' 
The sufficiency of this holy rule shines forth conspicuously, in the ampl 
provision made for the whole walk, and conversation of saints. An 
they required to deny themselves of ungodliness? they need not explore tin 
regions of science and literature, in order to learn what is detestable in th* 
estimation of the high and lofty One, who inhabiteth eternity; the saints o ; 
God are taught by the word, to deny themselves of ungodliness, and world 
)y lusts. Are they required to live soberly? they need not form a connec 
fcion with the world to effect this blessed object; they find it written, "lsrae 
shall dwell safely alone;" — they are taught by grace to live soberly, am 
be temperate in all things. Are they required to live righteously, an 
godly? the word of the Lord is the only complete rule of righteousnes 
and godliness. This rule applies to every department of Zion, in matter 
of faith. The precious rule requires of them to hold fast the form of soun* 
words, and sound doctrine, and in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ 
commands them, to withdraw from e\ery brother that walketh disorderly 
* c And if there come any unto you, and bring not this doctrine, (the rul 
says) receive him not into your house, neither bid them God speed." Al 
the ordinances of the house of God, are plainly expressed in this sac.rei 
rule. The discipline is fully contained in the Holy Scriptures. "Tin 
tieretie after the first and second admonition is to be rejected." The un 
ruXy, the drunkard, the liar, with all other disorderly characters, are to b' 



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* at away according to the rules in these cases provided by Zion's King, 
t | 'he manner of bringing into service, the gilts which God has bestowed 
pon individual members, for the edification of his body, together with all 
elative duties, of the ministers to the churches, and of the churches to the 
, miisters, including every necessary arrangement, for ministerial support, 
i clearly stated in the word of God, in so much that all humanly devised 
lans, are unnecessary and uncalled for. But second, the infallibility of 
lis divine rule of our faith and practice is abundantly demonstrated by the 
ct before noticed, that it is of God, and is never to be superseded by any 
ther rule. Again: this may be considered the infallible rule, when corn- 
ered with the various rules laid down by those who teach for doctrines the 
ammandments of men. Infallible first, because it cannot fail to please 
od, it being the result of his council, and based upon his sovereign will, 
econdly, it cannot fail to secure the peace and happiness of the saints. 
Great peace have they, that love thy law, and nothing shall offend them." 
i keeping his commandments, there is an exceeding great reward. Hath 
le Lord as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying 
»e voice of the Lord? "Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to 
earken, than the fat of rams." While on the other hand— "liebellion is,. 
5 the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is, as iniquity, and idolatry.'* 
gain: "If thy children forsake my law, (saith God,) and walk not in my 
idgments, if they break my statutes, and keep not my commandments, 
ien will I visit their transgressions with the rod, and their iniquities with 
ripes, &c." But lastly, this rule is infallible, because in adhering to it, 
e cannot fail to be right. Thirdly, we are to speak of the necessity of 
ihering strictly to the word of God, in all things, as the man of ourcoun- 
I, standard of our faith, and rule of practice, as the children of GocL 
'his necessity is predicated on, first, obligation; we contemplate Jesus 
hrist, in his relative character as prophet, priest, or king, in each and ev- 
•y of the offices our obligation will appear, As our prophet, we are 
ound to listen to his instruction. As our priest, we are bound to rely a- 
►ne in his atonement and intercession. And as our king, we are bound 
) own, and honor him in the legislative department of his kingdom, by re- 
ising to acknowledge any other laws, or ordinances, plans or devices, 
'hemes or contrivances, (in matters of religion,) than such as bear the 
road seal of his divine majesty, the king of Zion; and by our obedience 
all his commandments. Second, this necessity appears from the fre- 
nent and solemn admonitions given us, in the New Testament, like the 
owing: "Let no man deceive you by any means, for that day shall not 
)ffle. except there come a falling away first, and that man of sin be revea- 
•d, the son of perdition." 2 Thess. 2d chap. 3d verse. "Now the Spirit 
ieaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith> 
iving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils, speaking lies in 
.ypocrisy, having their conscience seared with a hot iron." I Tim. 4th 
lap. 2d verse. And again: "This know that in the last days perilous 
mes shall come, for men shall be lovers of their ownselves, covetous, boast- 
s, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy." % 
im. 3d chap. "Even as there shall be false teachers among you, who 
rivily shall bring in damnable heresies, even denying the Lord that 
ight them, and bring upon themselves swift destruction, and many shall 
ow their pernicious ways; by reason of whom, the way of truth shall be 



8 

evil spoken of. And through covetousness, shall they with feigned words, 
make merchandize of you; whose judgment now of a long time lingereth 
not, and their damnation slumbereth not." 2 Peter, 2d chap. 1st. 2d* and 
3d verses. Thirdly, the necessity of adhering strictly to this divine rule, 
appears from the manifest fulfilment of these fearful predictions. The time 
has evidently come, in which men will not endure sound doctrine, but after 
their own lusts, they are heaping to themselves teachers, having itching ears. 

The present divided state of our denomination, and the general ferment 
and commotion of what is called the religious world, should teach us the 
necessity of flying to the word, and to the testimony, knowing that it is 
there, and only there we shall find safety. The visibility of the church of 
Christ requires that all who love our Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity and in 
truth, should "Give the more earnest heed to the things spoken (in this ho-j 
}y book) lest at any time we should let them slip." The visibility of Zi- 
on depends on this, "Then are ye my disciples indeed, if you do whatso- 
ever I command you." Except a man deny himself, take up his cross and 
follow me, he cannot be my disciple. Brethren, if we are not governed by 
this holy, perfect, and infallible rule, we have no better claim to the charac- 
ter of churches of Christ, than the nations around us, Jews or Pagans. 
""Would you shine forth as "A city set upon a hill (owned and blessed oil 
God,) whose light cannot be hid," this can only be. when you are enabled 
through grace to shine forth in Bible doctrine, discipline, ordinances, he. 
rejecting all things that will not measure with this rule. Let us then have 
on the whole armor of righteousness, our feet shod with the preparation oi 
the gospel of Christ, our loins girt about with truth, and in our hands the 
sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God, that we may fight, and finish 
the course, keep the faith, receive the crown, and eventually receive the end 
of our faith, even the salvation of our soul. We are aware, dear breth 
ren, that a closer walk with God, will draw down on you the indignation 
of such as have never received the lovjl of the truth, as it is written, "Yea, 
and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus, shall sutler persecution." But 
be not discouraged at this, your place of defence shall be the munition ol 
rocks; the eternal God thy refuge, and underneath you his everlasting 
aim. Let us then stand fast in the liberty wherewith Christ has made us 
free, and be not entangled again, with the yoke of bondage. Let us re 
member, "As for God, his way is perfect, the word of the Lord is tried, he 
is a buckler to all them that put their trust in him, for who is God save the 
Lord? and who is a rock, save our God?" 2 Samuel, 22d chap. 31st anc 
32d verses. Also, Psalms, 28, 30th and 31st verses. His sayings are 
faithful and true, and since Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, to-day anc 
forever; is the Amen, the faithful and true witness; as he is the way, the 
truth, and the life — and as God has established his throne in Zion, and 
said unto him, "Thy throne, O God, is forever, a sceptre of righteousness 
is the sceptre of thy kingdom" — let us, dear brethren, as churches and as 
individuals, esteem it our greatest privilege, and most reasonable service, 
"to bring forth the royal diadem, and crown him Lord of all." 

May the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God the Father, 
communion and fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with you evermore, Amen 



Free Frtus — larboro* A\C. 



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MINUTES 



OF THE 



Kehukee Baptist dissociation? 

HOLDEN AT THE 

- 

GROSS BOAS MEET! NG HOUSE, 
EDGECOMBE COU.WTF, JV. C. 

Commencing Saturday before the first Sunday in October, 183^ 



SATURDAY, October 4th, 1834. 

1. The Introductory sermon was delivered (agreeably to ap- 
pointment) by Elder George W. Carrowan, from Colossians., 
iii. chap. 1, 2, 3 verses: "If ye be risen with Christ, seek those 
things which are above, where Christ sitteth at the right hand 
of God. Set your affections on things above, not on things on 
the earth. For ye are dead, and your life is hid with Christ in 
God." Prayer by Elder Joseph Biggs. 

2. The Association then convening, and being opened with 
prayer by Elder William Hyman, proceeded to business, and 
chose Elder William Hyman, Moderator; Elder Joseph Biggs, 
Clerk, who called to his assistance brother Joseph D. Biggs. 

3. Brethren in the ministry (present) from sister Associa- 
tions, (of the same faith and order) were invited to seats with 
us; when Elders Mark Bennett, Thomas Dupree and Burreli 
Temple, seated themselves. 

4. Letters from thirty churches were handed in by the mes- 
sengers therefrom; the same were read, and their representa? 
tion stated in the table of churches. 



: 



2 



NAMES OF CHURCHES 

and Counties where 

situated. 



1 B iregrass, Martin, — 
2. Blount's Cr'k. Beaufort.- 
3- Coirenjock, Cuirituck.t 
4 Conoho, Martin — 

5. Conetoe, Edgecombe, — 

6. Concord, Washington, 

7. Cross Roads, Edgecombe, 

8. Cedar Island, Carters 

9. Deep Creek, Halifax — 

10. Falls Tar River, Nash - 

1 1 . Flat Swamp, Pitt, 

12 Frying Pan, Tyrrell, - 

13. Goose Creek, Beaufort — 

14. Great Swamp, Pitt, — 
15 Hunting Quarters, Car 1 

»er**t t 

16. Kehukee, Halifax,— 

17. Lawrence's M H. Edg - 

combe, 
18 Little Alligator, TyrveU,- 
^9. Morattock, Washington,- 
50. North Creek, Beauforl, 

21. No.Maltamitskeet,Uyde, 

22. Old Ford, Beaufort, — 
23 Picot M.H Martin, — 
24. PoweWs Point, Curri 

tuck, — t 
25 Pungo, Beaufort, — 

26. Scuppernojig, Tyrrell, — 

27. So Mattamuskeel, Hyde, 

28 Skewarkey, Martin, 

29. Smilhwick's Creek, Martin 

30. Sound Side, Tyrrell, — 

31. Spring Green, Martin,— 

32. Tarboro\ Edgecombe, — 

33. Washington, Beaufort, — 

34. While Plains, Beaufort, 



MINISTERS fy DELEGATES. 



Williams's M. H- 
corabe, — 



Edge 



James Harrison, Wm. Whitaker,* 

Lodowick Reddit, Joseph Lewis, 

SAMUEL TATUM,* 

John Bryan, Asa Jones, 

John H. Daniel, William Thigpen 

Y1IC AJAH AMBROSE,* Daniel 

Clifion,* 
V ILL! AM HYMAN, Joseph J. 

Pippen, 
>aniel Harriss, Thomas Robertson 

• -seph S Battle, James S. Battle, 
UKE WARD, Edmund Andrews 

"VJalachi Lintel,* James Potter, 
Villis Fleming, Hardy Whichard, 



General Voung, Michael Kins, 
JOSHUA LAWRENCE, William 

Dicken, 
Lemuel Basnight, Edward Payne,* 
J: cob Wilkerson, Wilson Mizell, 
LEMUEL ROSS,* Thomas Bar- 
row. Daniel Wilkinson, 
\SA SAWYER,* John Jordan, 

Isaac Sawyer, 
Wm. Singleton, Mercer D. Wilson, 



John R. Davis, Samuel Clark, 

JOSEPH BARNES,* 

GEORGE W. CARROWAN, R. M 

G. Moore, 
JOSEPH BIGGS, JOHN WARD, 
HUMPHREY STALLINGS, Ml- 

CAJAH PERRY,* 
Gilbert Brickhouse, Caleb Wood 

ward, 
Stephen Oulterbridge, Wm. Gray, 
Ely Porter, David Harper, 
Jesse Allen, Levin Wallace, 
MILES EVERITT,* Langley Ris 

pass, John Latham, 
David Bradley, 



Total, 



la' 
85- 


5S 

Ci Co 

0- 

1 
t 


9 

2 

1 


to 

ft. 

J 
1 


ft 

ft, 


2 
9 


4 


1 


1 
1 


4 
2 




1 


1 




i 






3 


1 

1 


C> 
1 
1 
3 
3 


1 
2 

2 


9 

2 




1 


1 


3 












! 


1 


2 
1 
1 


! 











2 




1 


1 




3 


2 


2 




1 


4 




1 


i 


1 


5 


1 


3 

1 


2 
1 

1 




1 

1 
2 
2 


1 


1 
1 


1 


1 
1 
'1 




1 




1 


1 






25 


16 


23 


2! 


35 


4 



170/ 



NOTE- Pastors of Churches, and other ordained M misters, are in small CAPITALS; un 
ordained Ministers in italics; those marked thus, * were not present; fftrni Churches marke 
thus, t we received no intelligence, in that case their number stands as last year; Dashes - 
denote no Pastors; (he last column shows (he contributions from the Churches to the Assocte 
tion Fund. 



5. Letters of correspondence from sister Associations wen 
called for^when a bundle of Minutes from the Contentnea As 
sociation whs handed forward by EiderThomas Dupree, setting 
forth his appointment as messenger from them to us; the same 
was distributed. Also, a letter with Minutes from the Litth 



3 

River Association, was handed in by their messenger, Elder 
Burrell Temple; the letter was read and the Minutes distri- 
buted. 

6. Petitionary letters were called for, when one from the 
church at Daniel's meeting house, Halifax county; and another 
from R >cky Swamp, in said county, were handed in by th^ir 
messengers, petitioning for admittance into this body; the same 
were read, and some difficulties arising, they were advised to 
wait and endeavor to get the difficulties out of the way. 

7. The following committees were appointed, (viz:) Elders 
Joseph Biggs, Joshua Lawrence, and Mark Bennett, to exam- 
ine the circular letter; brethren James 8. Battle and Edmund 
Andrews, on finance; brother R. M. G. Moore to write to the 
Contentnea Association; brother Stephen Outterbridge to write 
to the Little River Association; all to report on Monday next, 

8. Elders Thomas Dupree, Burrell Temple, and Joshua* 
Lawrence, were requested (by private ballot) to occupy the 
stage by preaching on the morrow, and that divine service be- 
gin at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

9- Resolved, that our next Association be holden at Skewar* 
key meeting house, Martin county, to commence on Saturday 
before the first Sunday in October, 1835, at 11 o'clock, A. M, 
and that Elder Joshua Lawrence be requested to deliver a ser- 
mon introductory to business; and Elder William By man bje 
requested to do the same in case of the failure of the former. 

The Association then adjourned until Monday next, 9 o'- 
clock, A. M. with prayer by Elder Joshua Lawrence. 

SUNDAY, October 5th, 1834. 
Elder Thomas Dupree introduced the service of the day, and 
preached from St. John, iii. 3: "Except a man be born again 
he cannot see the kingdom of God." Elder Burrell Temple 
followed, and preached from Solomon's Songs, viii. 5: "Who 
is this that cometh up from the wilderness, leaning upon her be- 
loved." Elder Joshua Lawrence closed, in preaching from 
J >mcs, i. 27: "Pure religion and undefiled before God the Fa- 
ther is this, to visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, 
«nd to keep himself unspotted from the world." Elder Joseph 
Biggs then dismissed the congregation with prayer and praise, 
We hope the labors of the day were not in vain. 

MONDAY, October 6th, 1834. 
The Association being assembled, and opened with prnye^ 
by Elder George W. Carrowan, proceeded to business. 

10. The committee appointed to examine the circular letter 



4 
reported, that they had done so, and advised that it be read; the 
same was done, and it was approved and ordered 10 be attacji- 
ed to our Minutes. 

11. The Rules of this Association were read. 

12. The list of the members of this Association was called, 
and absentees noted. 

13. A letter of correspondence from the Contentnea Asso* 
ciation was handed in by their delegates, Elders Thomas Du. 
pree and John Atkinson, (which they were prevented from doing 
on Saturday last by reason of sickness,) and the same was read. 

14. A letter prepared to the Little Ftiver Association was 
handed in, read and approved, signed by the Moderator and 
Clerk, and Elders Joshua Lawrence and William Hyman ap- 
pointed messengers to them. Another, prepared to the Con- 
tentnea Association, was handed in, read, approved, and sign- 
ed by the Moderator and Clerk, and Elders Joshua Lawrence 
and William Hyman appointed delegates to bear the same. 

15. Elder Joshua Lawrence was requested to prepare a cir- 
cular letter for the next Association. 

16. The committee of finance reported, that they find there was in 
the hands of our Treasurer, at the-close of last Association the 
sum of - - - - -' , $63 67 

They find the Association Dr. for transcribing the Minutes of last 
year for the press and superintending the press, copying one on 
our records, & distributing them as heretofore, the sum of $10 00 

Paying for the printing of 500 copies, - - 12 00 

— 22 00 

Leaving a balance in the hands of the Treasurer at the com- 
mencement, of this meeting, ... $41 67 
Received in contributions from the churches at this time, - 39 40 
Making a sum now in the hands of the Treasurer of - $81 07 

The Association concurred with the report. 

17. The following queries were handed in, read, and receiv- 
ed to debate, (viz:) Is it according to gospel order, or is it not, 
if sixty or more members composing a church of our faith and 
order, should they as a chureh exclude one of their body for 
disorder, then after the exclusion, should twenty or more of the 
former sixty be dismissed from the body, and be constituted in- 
to a new church, for them to receive the excluded member into 
fellowship again? Answer. It is not orderly to receive the ex- 
cluded member until he is restored by the body that excluded 
him. Is it agreeably to gospel order, for any member or church 
of our Association, to invite into their pulpits to preach, any 
minister of any other order? Answer. No. 

Resolved, that Elder Joseph Biggs be requested to trans- 
cribe and prepare these Minutes for the press, and have 500 



5 

copies struck, and copy one on our records, and distribute them 
to the Associations with whom we correspond, and the balance 
to the churches agreeably to their contribution, as heretofore. 

The Association then adjourned to the time and place ap- 
pointed, with exhortation and prayer by the Moderator. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Moderator. 
JOSEPH BIGG*, Clerk. 



The Ministers and Messengers composing the Kehv.kee Baptist Association, 
now sitting at the Cross-Road Meeting-house , Edgecombe County,^. C. 
the 4th, 5th, and 6th days of October, 1834, to die several Churches they 
represent, send you this epistle of ours as usual, in which we shall call your 
attention to a RELIGIOUS TRAFFIC. 

Dear Brethren: The origin of simple and honest commerce is of a 
very ancient date, and the practice of it is not censurable in a civil point of 
view, for from it man derives benefit; bat religious commerce is impious 
fraud, and an abomination in the sight of God. By civil commerce man 
finds a competency; and more than tins, interest and duty forbid him to de- 
sire. Warning was given him in Paradise, not to covet, nor eat of the tree 
of knowledge of good and evil; formed for a religious creature, he was not 
to crave, nor use any thing that was not needed; the bare craving would 
mar his peace, and the eating would be followed by a curse; but he desired, 
he eat, and ill to him were the consequence. In this incident wt find 
something akin to religious traffic, if not the thing itself. The commodity 
to be sold was obedience to God, (a religious commodity;) the price, the 
being as gods, knowing good and evil, (promotion and alienation.) Every 
act of religious traffic, from that period to the present, has been of the 
same character, the selling or forsaking of obedience to God, for the ad- 
vancement of some way contrary to God; and as often as it is practiced it 
finds reproof from the word of God, and is followed with chastisement, cur- 
ses, and judgments. Abraham was to leave his land and kindred; thus sig- 
nifying, that the family of God must have no carefulness for the treasures 
of this world, they being dangerous to the most godly; nor was Canaan, 
(which was given to him to be sold for his former land,) from which we 
gather, that no part of the gospel inheritauce must be sold for mammon or 
lucre. Corah, and his company attempted to usurp ihe priest's office, 
and was taken down alive into the earth. A remarkable rase of pious or 
rather impious traffic, was that of Balaam; he pretended he must not act 
without consulting the Lord, nor to go beyond the Lord's commandment; 
but he was deceitful, for the angel of the Lord opposed him in the way. 
Peter calls his transaction an error, and Jude says that he loved the wages 
of unrightousness; reproved by the ass, and warned by the angel, he still 
sought the promised reward; and fell in aiding the Midianites warring a- 
gainst Israel, not without causing Israel to bring a curse upon themselves, 
(while he was unable to curse them,) by intermarrying with TVlidianitish 
women, Saul is^a fearful example of fraud, or deceit in destroying th$ 



6 

Amalekites; lie and the people spared Agag the king, and the best of the 
oxen and sheep, pretending they were reserved to be offered in sacrifice to the 
Lord. This was punished by taking from him the kingdom, by leaving 
him the remainder of his days in adversity, and by bringing him and his 
sons to a miserable death by the hands of the Philistines. Uzziah, king 
of Judah, became strong, coveted and invaded the priest's office, and was 
smitten with leprosy for life. The adversaries of Judah and Benjrmin 
sought to unite with Zerubbabel in building the house of the Lord, profes* 
sing to seek his God as he did, and to sacrifice to him, and on being rejec- 
ted opposed him all the days of Cyrus. The prophets, in the days of Micah, 
engnged in the work of gains by their ofHce and compelled the people to 
pay them. "Thus saith the Lord, concerning the prophets, that make my 
people err, that bite with their teeth and cry peace, and he that putteth into 
this mouth, they ever prepared war against him; they build up Zion with 
blood, and Jerusalem with iniquity. The heads thereof judge for reward, 
and the priests thereof teach for hire, the prophets thereof divine for mon- 
ey; yet they will lean upon the Lord and say, is not the Lord among us? 
none evil can come upon us." Micah, iii. chap. 5, 10, 1 1, verses. "For 
this Jerusalem was destined, to become heaps, and Zion to be plowed as a j 
field/' In the time of Zephaniah this complaint is heard: "her prophets are 
light and treacherous persons, her priests have polluted the sanctuary." 
Holy trade has been extended even to human bodies. "Joseph was bid 
off at twenty pieces of silver,"— "and our Saviour at thirty," the former 
sold by his own brothers, the latter by one of his twelve apostles— the 
one was sold for envy, the other through love of gain and profanity* 
"Israel sold the righteous for silver, and the poor for a pair 
of shoes," for which the Lord declared he would not turn away 
the punishment thereof. Amos, ii. 6. Pharaoh and Nebuchadnez- 
zar had their magicians, Ahab his prophets, and the men of Phi- 
lippi their soothsayers, all serving for hire. Ananias and Saphirai 
would buy the honors of religion for all their lands, and attempted to pay 
with part of the price. Simon wished to be qualified to communicate the 
Holy Ghost by laying on of his hands, and offered money; for this the apos- 
tles bid his money and him perish together. Some of the circumcision at! 
Crete, taught things which they ought not, for filthy lucre's sake, whom: 
the apostle calls "liars, evil beasts, slow bellies, whose mouths must be stop- 
ped." Some coveted after money, and erred from the faith, and pierced 
themselves with many sorrows. Peter warns his brethren of false teachers, , 
who should bring in damnable heresies, whose pernicious ways many 
should follow, and who with feigned words, should make merchandize ofi 
the saints; whose judgment, he tells us, was not lingering, nor their damna- 
tion slumbering* Jude advertises the saints that there are some crept in i 
unawares, walking after their own lusts, having men's persons in admira- 
tion because of advantage. A wo is pronounced upon them, resembling 
their fate to that of Sodom and Gomorrah. The first implicit account ofi 
seeking religious office for gain, is found (if memory serves) in that of Si- 
mon. The believing of the gospel fills the heart with charity, this prepa- 
red the saints in the days of the apostles to be liberal, and this liberality al- 
lowed the idle and covetous among the unregenerate to increase. But as 
their liberality was only in proportion to the needs of the saints and apos- 
tles, few for the sake of it would endure the persecutions and sufferings the)f 



It 



7 ' 

lii underwent; this accounts for the purity of the Christian religion, previous 
jto the cnurch of Rome, and the corruptions that ensued upon its establish- 

his Iment. The civil law put a stop to persecutions, and established salaries, 
and benefices; and like a hawk hovering over a chicken, or the wolf fos- 
tering a lamb, extended its kind protection (sure destruction) over the 
church, by teaching the flock to buy its food, and the shepherds not to feed 
them without pay. To make sure of all the money and goods in the em- 
pire, the Pope was declared to be without fault, and not liable to err; and 
that church was pronounced to be the true, or mothetf church, of ali the 
world. Greedy of the gold and silver of other countries, the spirit of con- 
quest raged, and although they professed to have put an end to persecution^ 
yet in course of time thev drenched cities and countries with human blood. 
They might justly term it a mother, for she was the first corrupt church of 
any magnitude in the Christian era, and almost all nations, savage, barbae 
rous, civilized, and enlightened, have felt her influence. She is the parent 
of ail corrupt and false churches; and upon her forehead was a name writ- 
ten, Mystery, Babylon the great, the mother of harlots, and abominations 
of the earth. Rev. xvii. 5. From her sprang the first missions in the six- 
teenth century. Xavier, and Dominic, were among the first missionaries; 
they visited Spain, Portugal, and other parts; and through all their tours, 
superstition and cruelty were their handmaids* From her too emanated 
the order called Jesuits; Ingratius Loyola was its founder* They agreed 
to draw no expenditures from the Pope and his government^ whithersoever; 
he should bid, they would go; and whatsoever he should command, they 
would do. Amongst other vows they took that of poverty. They peti- 
tioned the Pope, and he confirmed the order* They asked permission to 
trade with the nations, to which they should carry the gospel, and other 
places. They taught the South American nations to hate the Spaniards, 
and cut off, as much as possible, all intercourse between the two nations. 
They sought to erect Paraguay into an independent empire, subject alone 
to their order. They interfered with the civil government of China, estab- 
lished warehouses in various parts of Europe, and became wealthy and 
powerful. They frequently solicited the See to absolve them from the vow 
of poverty, and were eventually successful. Their growing weaith and 
might, together with the secrecy of their policy, became sources of alarm 
to the civil powers of Europe; and by joint co-operation of the latter, the 
order was extinguished in the beginning of the seventeenth century, But 
missions did not cease with the extinction of the Jesuits* While under the 
mask of piety, the Pope and clergy were practising all the multifarious 
forms of religious traffic within the borders of the Papal dominions, they 
were endeavoring to extend it to other countries by means of missions 1 . 
Most of the Catholic States were at some period engaged in the work. At 
length it found its way among the Protestants. A few perhaps were invi- 
ted by benevolent feelings, while many were doubtless moved by the same 
design that actuated the Catholic church. Near the close of the last centu- 
ry, it crossed over into the United States. It is worthy of remark, that its 
character has not changed; only circumstances have altered, while its prin- 
ciple continues the same. They anticipated their reward, with commerce 
with the nations, the acquisition of territory, and the extension of domin- 
ion; with the last, from money solicited from church and state, previous to 
entering on their mission, if it be a foreign; but from the promise of it, if a 



8 
domestic mission. Thirty or forty dollars per montn, has been the regu- 
lar pay lot uoraesiic missions. Travelling among their own countrymen 
anjfl in their own native Stales, where they have no reason to doubt, that (ii 
called of God,) the gifts of the minister exercised with zeal and devotion, 
and strengthened by a Christian deportment, would procure them an ex- 
emption from suffering. Considerable traffic has been carried on in the 
form of Bible Societies, and Tract Societies. Donations have be^n recei 
ved to defray the expences of bibles, with a promise to give the bibles awaj 
to the poor, and altei wards they were sold by agents of the society at what 
could be had for them. Among the instances of religious trade may be 
classed Theological Seminaries. In these the student has amused himself f ' ial5 
with a view to eminence and distinction, to preferment and good salaries. 
Temperance Societies have been instituted to subserve the others, as giving 
in some measure, a fair prospect of success. Connections have been form- 
ed between the fraternity of the Freemasor/s and ministers of the gospel, 
under expectation of the latter to get gain, and to become more popular, as 
they were told it would add to their knowledge of the scriptures, and to 
their usefulness, and liberal donations withal had been made to ministers 
united with them. 

The scriptures furnish no account of a society similar to the above, not 
withstanding the advocates thereof profess to rest them upon bible author! 
ty. The support of the ministry, and spread of the gospel, have furnished 
pretexts to these societies. They urge that every true minister of the gos 
pel is a missionary; that the apostles were missionaries, and that even Jesus 
Christ was a missionary; that the word missionary is derived from the Lat- 
in word millo, [to send,] and the word apostle is from the Greek, apostillo, 1 
[to send out or from.] But as a man could not be an apostle unless he had 
seen Christ, (see L Corinthians, ix. 1,) we should think they would not pre- 
sume upon that name, and yet the epithet is applied to the first missionaries 
and also to some of late years. But the established name is missionary, it 
can be derived from the word millo; and it may be remarked that the Lat- 
in words, emisarius and emisaria, are translated into English, missionary, 
adversary, (see Ainsworth Dictionary, English into Latin.) But grant 
that it be derived from the Latin word, millo, the Romish church spoke 
that language; and this again speaks missions to have originated in that 
church. Again, admitting the word to be scriptural, and without objec- 
tion, (and we think there is no reasonable objection to the word itself,) yet 
names cannot change the nature of things, nor prove the practice of mis* 
sions to be less or more than religious traffic. 

The head of the church who tells us his kingdom was not of this world, 
informs us that he came not to be ministered to, but to administer; his apos- 
tles were reminded that they had freely received, and commanded freely to 
give; they were charged to provide neither gold, nor silver, nor brass in 
their purses, adding, the workman was worthy of his meat, (not of his mo- 
ney;) and that they should take nothing for their journey. The seventyi 
that were sent forth received the same instructions, it may be thought by 
some that these instructions were reversed, or countermanded, in Luke, 
xxii. 35, 36; but this is a mistake. They were not admonished to procure a 
purse, but if any had one, to take it. The time had come when Judas, who 
held the purse, or bag, (for sll) was about to desert them; so that each must 
carry his own purse for himself. Again: if each were directed to obtain a 



;ei 



9 

purse, e.icii was also commanded to get a sword, and so to go armed with 

N a carnal weapon* whereas the Saviour, when told there were two swords, 
said it was enough; and he reproved Peter for using the one he had. All 
the scripture authority ministers have now to preach, is contained in the 

J ei commission, after Christ's resurrection. The phrase — I am with you al- 
way, even unto the end of the world — shows this commission to be binding 
on ail subsequent ministers, to the end of time. If this commission, which 
was binding upon the apostles, be binding upon ministers of later times, the 
instructions with which they were sent are also binding upon the present 
ministry. This commission enjoins, "Teaching them to observe all things 
whatsoever 1 have commanded you." There is no injunction, nor even an 
example, nor any thing in the commands of Christ and practice of the apos- 
tles, that will justify these societies, or countenance any species of religious 
traffic. When ministers of the gospel would have the sum specified for 
preaching, it is much like Judas: how much will you give, and I will sell 
him to you? When they cannot go without provision previously made, it 
savors somewhat of Demas, who forsook Paul, having loved this present 
world; or Balaam, who loved the wages of unrighteousness, and served Ba- 
lak for hire. When they evince a determination to carry their favorite 
schemes, at the risk of divisions and offences, contrary to the doctrine 
which they have learned from scripture, the word itself declares, "they 
serve not our Lord Jesus Christ, but their own belly,'* (their own lusts.) 
Paul declares his reward to be, (see his own words,) "that when I preach 
the gospel, I make the gospel of Christ without charge; that I abuse not my 

d power in the gospel." When they abuse the power by begging the church- 
es beyond their (vee offerings, and are persuading the world into contribu- 
tions and membership in their societies, we are forced to consider it mer- 

ie chandize. Moses, the prophets, John the Baptist, Jesus Christ, and the 
apostles, will be consulted in vain for a warrant to such societies and prac- 
tices. According to New Testament information, the sole intention of 
contributions was, to relieve necessity. Instance: "Ye did send once and 
again to my necessity." A certain contribution was made, "for the poor 
saints which were at Jerusalem" — "ye ought to support the weak" — sold 
their possessions and goods, aud parted them to all men, as every man 
had need" — "aud distribution was made unto every man, according as ev- 
ery man had need" — "and that ye assist her in whatsoever business she hath 
need of you" — "distributing to the necessity of the saints." It ma) 7 be 
thought that ministers should live by the gospel, but the scripture says not 
by the gospel, but "of the gospel," and this implies only the relief of want; 
for the apostle speaks in the same chapter of "suffering all things," and 
this amongst other things, gave rise to the complaint, and freedom of 
speech to the church at Corinth, who had a right to expect the relief of his 
necessities; yet observes that it "were better for him to die," than to insist 
so strenuously upon this "as to make his glorying void;"-— that not "at this 
time your abundance ma) 7 be a supply for their wants, that their abundance, 
may be a supply for your want" — "he that gathered much had nothing 
over, and he that gathered little had no lack" — for the administration of 
this service not only supplied the want of the saints, but is abundant also 
by many thanksgivings unto God" — "the laying by on the first day of the 
week was for the poor saints of the church at Jerusalem." 1 Cor. xvi. 23— 



10 

Romans, xv. 26. The word chanty is no where used in the New Testa- 
meat, as touching, or the ministriug of our substance. Is God the author 
of missions, and of all the traffic? It is written, "God is not die author of 
confusion, but of peace, as in all churches of the saints." Originated and 
conducted under the Pope and his clergy, it has spread strife, divisions 
wherever it has gone; splitting asunder families, churches, associations, and 
communities, and often leaving in its train a breach never to be healed. If I 
it be the offspring of a covetous and wicked spirit, will God own and bless 
it? The devil often mocks or imitates the work of God, but has God imi- 
tated and fallen in with the work of satan? How different is the conduct of 
these gospel venders from that of the apostles. The apostle "rather than 
make the gospel of none effect," (himself and his office reproachful or cen- 
surable, and consequently unsuccessful,) exclaims, "1 have coveted no 
man's silver, or gold, or apparel, yea, ye yourselves know, that these hands 
have ministered to my necessities, ajid to them that were with me." He 
worked for himself and his companions. Thus the disciples of that day, 
with fired, devout, and godly zeal, and burdened with the salvation and care 
of souls; deeply impressed with theloveof Christ, and crucified to the world; 
feeling their responsibility to God, and submitting to the loss of all things; 
bearing the gospel of life and peace, and spreading joy and comfort in the 
midst of tribulation; and directing their course whithersoever the spirit call- 
ed them, made their way "through patience and afflictions, through neces- | 
sities and distresses, stripes and imprisonments, tumults and labor, watch- 
iugs and fastings; approving themselves, as the ministers of God, by pu-re- 
ness, by knowledge, by long suffering, by kindness, by love unfeigned, by 
the word of truth, by the Holy Ghost, by the power of God, by the armor L 
of righteousness, on the right hand; and on the left, by honor and dishonor, i\ { 
by evil report and good report; as deceivers, and yet true; as unknown, and 
yet well known; as dying, and yet living; as chastened, and not killed; as 
sorrowful, yet always rejoicing; as poor, yet making many rich; as having 
nothing, possessing all things." They went at the call of the Holy Ghost, 
and when their brethren craved they were in want, they sent to their neces- 
sities—they waited not for a contribution. It needs not be urged that that 
was a day of miracles: the ceasing of miracles destroyed not the duty of- 
ministers, nor changed the manner of supporting the ministry, nor of sprea- 
ding the gospel; the sufferings of the preachers, when the Reformation tools 
place in Europe, were much like those of the apostles; they were persecu- 
ted, whipped, imprisoned and burnt. The sufferings of the faithful were 
the same through all the persecutions of Rome. The early Baptists of our „ 
own country suffered a similar treatment, and it still continues, to be as the 
word declares, "they that will live godly in Christ Jesus, shall suffer perse- 
cution." But from the days of the apostles to the present time, men have 
been found under the character of ministers of the gospel, who serving their 
own lusts, and following after filthy lucre, have been unfaithful in the word; 
and such have uniformly escaped persecution. Sooner than the ministry 
should be blamed, the apostle would hunger for the bread which it was the 
duty of the church to give. But what do we now see? Ministers fre- 
quently leaving churches, either because the church can no longer satisfy 
their unrestrained cravings, or because their ministry is blamed, and blame- 
worthy; while they are so often changing positions, and sometimes too it is 



11 

well known for what they term (more ample support,) our thoughts are for- 
ced upon the scripture, "wandering stars." The primitive ministers, who 
were not fed by miracles, labored in an age and quarter when and where 
ihey as much needed providing for beforehand, as any ministers since; and 
yet, agreeably to the word, as expressed, when they started the church on- 
ly lifted up their prayers to God for them. If the lot of missionaries and 
preachers be cast among their own countrymen, and they answer the cha- 
racters of "ambassadors for Christ," we feel assured their bread shall not 
ail them. If the Lord indeed send them to heathen lands, the heathen's 
ubstance shall sustain them. As evidence, Paul was sent of God, his 
preaching was successful, and immediately after Lydia's baptism she invi- 
ed him, "come into my house, and abide there." So the jailor, when he 
fjad brought them into bis house, he "set meat before them." The Jews, 
lie Macedonians fed them; and our ministers, though Americans, (if sent of 
jod,) shall be fed by Birmahs ? Hindoos, Chinese, barbarians, jailors, 
nerchants, men, and women. 

Were we to consider missions, and the various connections therewith, to 
)e the second beast spoken of in the xiii. chapter of Revelations, it would 
tot make it so, provided it is not that beast; but we are inclined to think it 
s> The above mentioned book, from the beginning of the iv. chapter to 
be end, contains a prophecy respecting the gospel church, and the church 
>f anti-Christ, from the time it was written to the end of the world. In this 
>ook are described two beasts: the first, "rising up out of the sea, having 
even heads and ten horns, and upon his horns ten crowns, and upon his 
lead the name of Blasphemy," Stc. This, it is thought, has reference to 
he church of Rome, which rose out of the Christian church, by changing 
he doctrine and ordinances of the gospel. The second, "coming up out 
f the earth, which had two horns like a lamb, and spake as a Dragon," he. 
This, in point of time, was to succeed the first beast; and the last great en- 
my described, with which the church of Christ on earth has to struggle, 
ie church of Rome, was no more the church of Christ but of the earth, or 
he world, and from this sprang missions, earthly and sensual in its mo- 
ives and ends. From its beginning, the publishing and loud proclaiming 
f the good it has done, is like the "voice of the Dragon;" its influence over 
aints and sinners, men and women, individuals, families, churches, and 
ountries, is like the power of the Romish church; the professions of bene- 
'olent institutions, and of the great sacrifices they make, and like the horns 
fa lamb their drawing money from men with the promise of a heaven- 
y reward, is like causing the earth and its inhabitants to worship the first 
east, by sacrificing to the god of gains. 

The reign of Popery, which was deeply wounded by the Reformation, 
ppears to he healed by missions. The wonderful display of conversions 
B like fire coming down from heaven, in the sight of men; the accounts 
re often miraculous and deceptive. The characteristic of the first beast 
■'as, gains by religion; so an image of the same is already made. Theac- 
ion and vigor given to missions, is life given to tiie imago; and in its ad- 
ocates,, speaks and condemns, as covetous and unchristian, those who will 
ot worship or love the cause of missions. Publishing the names of mem- 
ers, and contributions, is like causing them to receive a mark in lbe.fr 
ight hand, or forehead. The power of the two beasts are united in war- 



1% 

ring against the Lamb, but the Lamb shall overcome them. The destruc- 
tion and judgments of both will lake place together; for the beast*, and the 
fai-»e prophets, were taken and cast into the lake. It is believed, that ma- 
ny of the children of God are bowing to the image of the beast: let us 
call your attention, brethren, (who are friendly to missionaries,) to be care- 
ful that every step you take be on scripture ground*; and you, brethren, 
who are opposed to them, continue to examine diligently by the same 
word, whether we be right or wrong; if we are right, be not disheartened 
nor faint in all the war. Amidst all the distresses caused by missions, the 
divine presence will not forsake you, till the Lamb, with his called, and 
chosen, and faithful, shall shout you with victory home to heaven. 



Free Press — Tar boro 7 N. C. 









\ 



I) 



MINUTES 






OF THE 

Kehukee Baptist dissociation, 

HELD AT 

MAUTIK COUNTY, JV. C 

COMMENCING 

Saturday before the first Sunday in October, 1335. 

SATURDAY, October 51, 1335. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was delivered (agreeably 
to appointment) by Elder Joshua Lawrence, from 1st epis- 
tle of John, iv. chap. 10th verse: "Herein is love, not that 
we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be 
the propitiation for our sins." 

2. The Association then convened and was opened 
with prayer by Elder William Hyman, and proceeded to 
choose Elder William Hyman, Moderator; and Elder Jo- 
seph Biggs, Clerk, who was permitted to call to his assist- 
ance Brethren R. M. G. Moore and Joseph D. Btggs. 

3. Brethren in the ministry from sister Associations 
(present) were invited to seats with us, when Elders Tho- 
mas Duprec, Mark Bennett, Jesse Adams, Eli Holland, 



I 

and James Griffin, and Brother Lanier Griffin, seated 
themselves. 

4, Letters from thirty churches were handed in, by the 
messengers, and read, and their representation slated in 
the table of churches. 



S3^55j&£ -MimaTna «. delegates 



i <* 1^,1 ... I 



gl53|» 



Bnregrass, Martin, — 
Bioutit a Cr'k> Beaufort,-^ 
Couenjock, Currituck, | 
Conoho, Martin, — 
Coneto, Edgecombe, 
Concord, Washington, 



1. Bnregrass, Martin,— jJames Harrison, Abram Pea! 

2 B'ouul's Cr'k, Beaufort.- Martin Ross, Lodowick Reddit, 
SAMUEL TATUM,* 
John Bryjtn, Asa Jones, 
Richard E Rives, Wm. Thigpen, 
MICAJAH AMBROSE," Daniel 
Clifton, 

1. Cross Roads, Ldgecombe, ] \V\LLl\M HYMAN, Joseph J. 
Pippen, 
Daniel Harriss, Thomas Robertson 



8. Cedar Island, Cartcref,- 

9. Deep Crtek, Halifax, — t 

10. Falls Tar River, Nash,— 

11. Flat Swamp, Pitt, 

12. Flatly Greek, Pasquotank 
13 Frying Pan, Tyrrell,— t 
11. Goose Creek, Beaufort, — 

15. Great Swamp, Pitt, — 

16. Hunting Quarters, Car 

teret, — t 

17. Kehukee, Halifax,— 
18 Lawrences M. H. Edge- | 

combi 1 , 
19. Utile Alligator, Tyrrell,- 
2 ». Moraltock, Washington,-' 
21. A'orlh Creek, Beau fori, 

22 No.Matlamuskeet,Uyde. 

23. Old Ford, Beaufort, — 

24. Picol M. H Martin, — 

25. Powell's Point, Curri- 
tuck, — t 

26. Pungo, Beaufort, — 
£7- Seuppemong, Tyrrell, -f 
28. So- Slattamuskcct, Hyde, 

29 Skewarkey, Martin, 

30. Smilhwick'sCrcek, Martin 

31. Sound Side, Tyrrell, — 

32. Spring Green, Martin, — 

S3 Tarboro', Edgecombe, 

34 Washington, Benuforl, — 

35 While Plains, Beaufort, 

36. Williams' M. H. Edge- 
combe, t 



Joseph S Battle, James S. Battle,* 
LUKE WARD, Wm.W.K.Philpot 
FrancisFletcher,Benj. Pendleton,* 

Backus Linton, 
HaruyWhichard, Willis J.Fleming: 



John Shields, Reuben Higgs, 
JOSHUA LAWRENCE, Richard 

Harrison, 
Lemuel Basnight, W'illiam Owens,* 
Jacob Wilkerson, Wilson MizHl 
LEMUEL KOSS,* William Price, 
I Henry Blount, 
Clement Daniels, John Jordan, 
iDavid Singleton, John Hodges, 
Joshua Robertson, Joel Smithwiek 
James Melson,* Jacob Beasley,* 

John R. Davis, Henrv L. Davis, 

JOSEPH BARNES,* 

GEOttGE W. CARROWAN, Josi- 

ah H;irriss, 
JOSEPH BIGGS, JOHN WARD, 
HUMPHREY STALL1NGS, Ml 

CAJAH PERRY, 
Abram J. Swain* Zebulou Kemp 
Leweliing Bowers, Stephen Ouiter* 

bridge, 
Coffieid King, Ely PoHer,* 
Levin Wailace, Jacob Swindell, 
Ml LES EVERITT,* John Haborn, 

Jonathan Wallace, 



Total, 



-S -8 



r- \s 



1 
2 

3; ] 



8 |. 

a.i ?- 



1 

2 3 



5 11 19 26 35 5 1647 40 25 



30 
37 
7g 
54 
41 

34 

41 
38 
21 
90 
75 
16 
21 
14 
82 

92 
136 

68 

6 

86 

53 
22 
12 
37 
13 

15 
17 

74 
73 

22i 

25! 

48| 
67 
42 

31 

52 



NOTE, Pastors of churches, Bad other ordained Ministers are in CAPITALS; unor» 
Aiined Ministers in Halves; those marked thus, " were not present; from churches marked 
thus, t we received no intelligence, id that case their number stands as last year; da-hes — - 
uen >te no Pa-rtois; the last column shows t lie contributions from the churches to the As- 
sociation fund. 



3 

5. Petitionary letters for membership into tills Associa- 
tion were called for, when one from the Flatly Creek 
church, Pasquotank county, was bunded forward and read* 
and after being satisfied of their good standing and order, 
they were received a member of this Association, and ma- 
nifested by the Moderator giving the tight hand of fellow- 
ship to their delegate. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister Associations 
were called for, when a bundle of Minutes from the Con- 
teutnea Association was handed forward by Elder Tho- 
mas Dupree, setting forth his appointment as messenger 
from them to us; and stated, that arrangements were made 
to send a letter, but that it had failed to come to 
hand. 

Also, a letter with Minutes from the Little River Asso- 
ciation was handed in by their messengers Elders Jesse 
Adams and Eli Holland; the letter was read and the Min- 
utes distributed. 

7. The following committees were appointed, (viz:) 
Elders William Hyman, Thomas Dupree, Joseph Biggs, 
Mark Bennett, and Jesse Adams, to examine the Circular 
Letter; Brethren Levvelling Bowers and Joseph John 
Pippen on Finance; Brother Richard E. Rives to write a 
corresponding letter to the Contentnea Association; Bra-* 
ther Joseph John Pippen to write to the Little River As- 
sociation — all to report on Monday next. 

8. Elders Joshua Lawrence, Thomas Dupree, and Jes- 
se Adams were requested (by private bailor) to occupy 
the stage by preaching on the morrow, and that divine ser- 
vice begin at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

The Association then adjourned until Monday next, 9 
o'clock, A. M. with prayer by Elder Thomas Dupree. 

SUNDAY, October 4<h. 
Elder Jesse Adams introduced the service of the day 
and preached from 2 Samuel, xiv. chap. 14th verse: "Fo*r 
we must needs die, and are as water spilt on the ground, 
which cannot be gathered up again; neither doth God re- 
spect any person; yet doth he devise means, that his ban- 
ished be not expelled from him." Elder Joshua Law- 
rence followed and preached from Psalms, xlvii. and 14th 
verse: "This God is our God for ever and ever; he will be 
our guide even unto death." Elder Thomas Dupree clo- 
sed by exhortation and prayer. From the faithfulness m 



4 
the delivery of the word, and the attention of the congre- 
gation, we hope the labors of love will not be lost. 

MONDAY, Oct. 5th. 
The Association met, and was opened with prayer, by 
Elder Joseph Biggs, and proceeded to business. 

9. On motion, Resolved, that the Roles for the govern- 
ment of this Association and the Constitution be read; 
which was done. 

10. The committee appointed to examine t he Circular 
Letter, reported that they had done so, and recommend- 
ed that it be read in the Association; which was done, and 
ordered to be attached to these Minutes. 

11. A letter prepared to the Contentnea Association 
was handed forward, read and approved, signed by the 
Moderator and Clerk, and Elder John Ward and Brother 
Richard E. Rives appointed our messengers to them. An- 
other, prepared to the Little River Association, was hand- 
ad forward, read, approved, and signed by the Moderator 
and Clerk, and Elders Micajah Perry and Humphrey Stal- 
ling** appointed our messengers to them. 

12. The list of the members of this Association was 
Called over and absentees noted. 

13. Resolved, that our next Association be held at Great 
Swamp meeting house, Pitt county, to commence on Sat- 
urday before the first Sunday in October, 1836, and that 
divine service commence at 11 o'clock. A. M. Elder Wil- 
liam Hyman is requested to preach an Introductory Ser- 
mon to that Association, and in case of his failure, Elder 
George W. Carrowan. 

14. Elder John Ward is requester! to prepare a Circu- 
lar Letter for the next Association, with leave to call in aid 
had c lioose his subject. 

15. Queries were called for, when the following was 
handed in by Elder Joshua Lawrence, read and received 
for debate, viz: "Can the Lord's Supper be rightly or 
gcripturally administered, by any man but an ordained 
minisler of the gospel!" Answer. No; and he who docs 
so, acts unscripturally. 

16. The Committee of Finance reported, that— 



s 

They find there was m the hands of the Treasurer, at (he 

close of last Association, - - - $Sl 07 

Received in contributions from the churches at this Assoc'n, 41 70 



$122 77 

They find the Association Dr. for transcribing the Minutes 

of last year for the press, copying one on our records, 

distributing as usual, &c. - - $10 00 

Paying for printing 500 copies, - - 18 00 

2S 00 



Leaving a balance now in the hands of the Treasurer of $94 77 

The Association concurred with the report. 

17. Resolved, that Elder Joseph Biggs be requested to 
transcribe and prepare these Minnies for the press, have 
600 copies printed and distribute them to the churches 
and our sister Associations with whom we correspond, as 
heretofore. 

The Association then adjourned, with an affectionate 
exhortation by the Moderator and prayer hy Elder Joshua 
Lawrence, to the time and place appointed. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Moderator. 
JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk. 



CmCUZiilfC LETTISH. 
7b the several Churches we represent. 

Dearly beloved Brethren: Our annual custom has been Jo 
address you by way of Circular Letter, after holding our annual As- 
sociation, on some important subject which we conceived might be 
profitable to your growth in grace and the knowledge of our Lord 
Jesus Christ, and the furtherance of your Christian progress heaven- 
ward. And such has been the variety of subjects upon which we 
have addressed you heretofore, that we are somewhat at a loss to 
choose a subject, that we think might be for the furtherance of your 
knowledge and edification in the truths of ihe gospel of Christ. 

Nevertheless, we shall venture to choose the following, hoping it 
may be for your establishment in the truth of Christ — namely: first 
to prove from the New Testament that all the first apostolic chur- 
ches were Baptist churches, and such as ours precisely that compose 
the Kehukee Association. And secondly, to show in a short way, 
that no other church has a right to be called the Christian church, 
nor their religion the Christian religion, but a Baptist church, orga- 
nized according to the apostolic plan as laid down in the New Tes- 
tament and provable therefrom. 

And in order to do this let it be first observed, that John the Bap- 
tist aud Jesus Christ were cotemporary, and are t he two first fouo- 



6 

ders of the Christian church, and propagators of the Christian reli- 
gion; the narration of whose history, acts, progress, and lives, is set 
down in the four Evangelists. And further let it be observed, that 
the Acts of the Apostles is the first ecclesiastical history that ever 
was written of the Christian religion and of the Christian chinch in 
all the world, and contains the history of the Christian church in its 
origin, rise and progress for about 31 years; and is the most ancient 
and authentic history of the Christian church on the face of the 
earth. Then by these five books, Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, and 
the Acts of the Apostles, we shall try to prove that all the apostolic 
churches Were Baptist churches, that the Kehukee Baptist churches 
are just such as they were, and that no other church but a Baptist 
church has a right to be called a Christian church. 

These thing*?, dear brethren, being premised as a standard of deci- 
sion to try by, we proceed to comply with the task before us, accor- 
ding to these books as therein contained, as the best guide to the truth 
of the matter proposed. 

John the Baptist snd Jesus Christ are properly the subjects of 
Roman history; because the fact is, that Judea at the time of their 
births and during their lives and ministry, was a province of Rome. 
Yet it may be said that their lives belong to Jewish history, because 
they were natives of Judea. It is evident from Roman history that 
Jesus Christ was born, according to the common reckoning, in the 
31st year of the reign of Augustus Cesar, on the 25th day of De- 
cember, in the year of the w T orld 4004; and that John the Baptist was 
born six months before him, about the 24lh of June; & that the New 
Testament has the aid of Roman history to prove the birth of Christ* 
by the taxing decree of Augustus, when Joseph and Mary went up 
to be taxed, at which time Christ was born. Augustus Cesar died 
14 years after the birth of Jesus Christ; in this interval of 14 years,. 
Archelaus was king of Judea, appointed to that office as the New 
Testament mentions, after the death of Herod. Augustus, in part of 
this 14 years, associated with him Tiberius in the management of 
the empire. Augustus dying 14 years after the birth of Christ, left 
by will the empire to Tiberius. In the third chapter of Luke's, 
gospel and first verse we have the following: "Now in the 15th year 
of the reign of Tiberius Cesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Ju- 
dea, and Herod being tetrarch of Gallilee, and his brother Philip te^ 
trarch of Iturea and of the region of Traehonitis, and Lysanias the 
tetrarch of Abilene — 2d verse: Annas and Caiaphas being the high 
priests, the word of God came unto John the son of Zacharias in the 
wilderness." Now add the 14 years that Augustus lived after the 
birth of Jesus Christ and the 15 years of the reign of Tiberius, when 
the text says the word of God came to John the Baptist, and that 
will show us how old both John the Baptist and Christ were when 
they began to preach; for 14 and 15 makes 29, so that Christ and 
John were 29 years old when they began their ministry, and John 
began his about six months before Christ. And thus says the iii. of 
Matthew, 1 r "In those days came John the Baptist preaching in the 
wildernesg of Judea — 2d verse: And saying, Repent for the king- 
dom of heaven is at hand — prepare ye the way of the Lord, make 
his paths straight. " Thus John the Baptist commenced his ministry 
about six months before Christ, to prepare the minds of the people 



7 

jp receive him as the promised Messiah and Saviour of the world, 
This preaching of John the Baptist, Mark calls the beginning of the 
gospel of Christ, i. chap. 1 verse. Then here is the commencement 
of the gospel, and the Christian church and Christian religion — in 
the 1 5th year of Tiberius Cesar, Pontius Pilate governor of Judea, 
and Herod tetrarch of Gallilee. Here let it be observed, that there 
were three Herods, one at the birth of Christ before the reign of Ar- 
chelaus, this Herod the second, and the Herod that killed James with 
the sword the third, if we are not mistaken. 

Then John commenced his ministry in the 29th year of his age 
in Ihe reign of the second Herod, governor of Gallilee, in the wil- 
derness of Judea — Mark, i. 4: "John did baptise in the wilderness 
& preach the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins; v<-rse S: 
I indeed have baptised yon with water, but he shall baptise you with 
the Holy Ghost. " Then John was the first Bapiiser tho' he himself 
was not baplised, but his commission was.sufficient authority for him 
to baptise others. Who gave him a commission? Read John, i. 33: 
"But he that sent me to baptise with water," &c. And the Saviour 
says: Was the baptism of John from heaven or of men? And again: 
he calls the baptism of John the counsel of God. Then John's com- 
mission to baptise was from God, therefore the Saviour submitted to 
it. as a command of God; and thus it was righteousness in John to 
administer it, and righteousness in Christ to submit to it as a com- 
mand of God. Then Jesus Christ was a Baptist and of John's or- 
der. Let us have the scripture. Luke, iii. 21: "Now when all the 
people were baptised, it came to pass that Jesus also being baptised 
and praying, the heaven was opened." Then Christ and John's dis- 
ciples received the same kind of baptism — verse 23: "Jesus himself 
began to be about thirty years of age." Mark, the text don't say 
he was thirty years of age — but about, Then this proves all we 
have said, that John and Jesus began their ministry in ihe 29ih year 
of their age, for Jesus commenced his ministry about forty days af- 
ter his baptism, on coming out of the wilderness from his tempta- 
tion. Where did this first Baptist preacher baptise? Mark, i. 4: 
• 4 ln the wilderness — verse 5: And there went out to him all ihe 
land of Judea and they of Jerusalem, and were all baptised of him 
(John) in the river of Jordan confessing their sins" — verse 9: "And 
it came to pass in those days, that Jesus came from Nyzarelh of Gal- 
lilee, and was baplised of John in Jordan — verse 10: And straight- 
way coming op out of Ihe water," &c. John, iii. 23: "And John 
also was baptising in iEnon near to Salim, because there was much 
water there, and they came and were baptised. 

Thus by the above three verses we can see what sort of Baptists 
John's were — that they were river Baptists and not bason Baptists-, 
that they were much water Baptists atic! not pitcher nor porringer 
Baptists, and that this first Bapsist preacher rt quired much waier in 
order to baptism, and that much water made it a convenient place 
for baptism — therefore it is said, the people came there and were bap- 
tised. And also the river of Jordan was a place of much water, as 
the history of Joshua shews, when Joshua crossed it with Israel. Thus 
the scriptures prove that the first Baptist preacher, who had his com- 
mission from God, required a place of much water m order to admin- 



8 
ister baptism. Then this proves immersion must be the mode he 
practised, and not sprinkling nor pouring, since it does not require 
much water to sprinkle or pour. Nor does it require a river in or- 
der to perform these rites of human and devil invention, to sprinkle 
or pour; and these words, much water, to prove that John baptised 
by immersion, outweighs every argument that Pedo- Baptists ever 
did or ever can offer. Then John's Baptists were precisely such 
Baptists as the Kehukee Baptists now are — all baptised where there 
is much water. Then Christ and John's disciples were river and 
much water Baptists, and uot little water Baptists. This being clear- 
ed, we proceed to show what kind of persons John baptised. 

Matthew, iii. 2: "And saying, Repent ye for the kingdom of hea- 
ven is at hand" — verse 6: "And were baptised in Jordan confessing 
their sins." Thus we see John taught repentance before baptism, 
and we also see what kind of persons, he baptised — those that con- 
fessed their sins. And we also see where he baptised — in Jordan, 
and not with a bason, or pouring from a pitcher — this is also 
clear. Verse 7: "But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sad- 
ducees come to his baptism," &c. Verse 8: "Bring forth fruits 
meet for repentance." The scriptures show us, that the Pharisees do 
not confess sins; for one said, L thank thee, O God, that 1 am not as 
other men. The scriptures also show us that the Sadducees deny 
the resurrection of the dead, angel or spirit — then of course these 
men neither repented nor confessed sins, and therefore, were reject- 
ed by John as not fit subjects of baptism; and that God was able to 
give repentance and confession of sins to publicans and harlots, or 
the most hardened sinners. And this is what he means by God's 
being able of these stones to raise up children to Abraham. So then 
repentance and confession of sins were two pre-requisites required 
by John before he would baptise a person. Then this shows that 
John's Baptists and the Kehukee Baptists are precisely the same; 
both require repentance and confession of sins before baptism. 
John baptised in the water, so do the Kehukee Baptists; and not 
out of the water, as sprinklers and pourers do. 

Luke, iii. 3: "And he came into all the country about Jordan, 
preaching the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins." 
This proves that John required repentance in order to baptism; for 
confession of sins is the fruit of repentance, and these were the charac- 
ters he baptised — such as confessed their sins. And further, he re- 
quired faith in the promised and coming Messiah, that lie then 
taught by his preaching was just ready to appear. Acts, xix. 4: 
"Then said Paul. John verily baptised with the baptism of repentance, 
saying unto the people, that they should believe on him which was 
to come after hirn; that is, on Christ Jesus." So then we see that 
John required repentance, confession of sins, and faith in Christ 
which was to come, before he would baptise a person — so do the 
Kehukee Baptists, and all the difference between John's Baptists and 
the Kehukee Baptists is.this: John said they must believe in Christ 
which was to come, in order to baptism; and the Kehukee Baptists 
say a man must believe in Christ which has come, in order to bap- 



9 

lism. Then John's Baptists and the Kehukee Baptists are precisely 
the same, requiring repentance, confession of sins, and faith in Christ 
before baptism. This matter being cleared, dear brethren, we think 
to your satisfaction, we proceed to show that the baptism of John and 
the apostles were one and the same baptism, and that the apostles prac- 
tised no other water baptism but that of John's, and the same way. 

Jesus Christ was a Baptist of John's make and a river Jordan Bap- 
tist you will not dispute. And it does not appear from scripture, 
that John ever congregated his disciples into a church or churches, 
for his ministry hardly lasted more than three and a half years; but 
that he left his disciples as so many scattered materials to build into 
the gospel church after his death. Then who baptised the twelve 
disciples is a question for consideration? We answer, that it was 
not the commisson of Christ to baptise with water, but John's 
commission; and the commission of Christ to baptise with the Holy 
Ghost. And here we offer proof that Christ did not in any instance 
baptise with water. John, iv. 1: "When therefore, the Lord knew how r 
the Pharisees had heard that Jesus made and baptised more disciples 
than John" — verse 2: (Though Jesus himself baptised not, but his 
disciples.)" That is, that Jesus, himself did not baptise with water, 
but his disciples did baptise with water is clear. Then, say you, his 
disciples were not Baptists; for if he did not baptise them, who did? 
We answer, from John i. 35: "Again the next day, after John stood 
and two of his disciples" — verse 36: "And looking upon Jesus as he 
walked, he saith, Behold the Lamb of God" — verse 37: "And the 
two disciples heard him speak, and they followed Jesus." Here 
then we see two Baptists of John's make following Christ as his dis- 
ciples. Verse 40: "One of the two which heard John speak and 
followed him, was Andrew, Simon Peter's brother." Then we 
clearly see from scripture, that here is two of John's Baptists among 
the twelve apostles; for by examining the list of the names of the 
twelve, we find Andrew was one of the apostles. And Christ, the 
scripture shows us, ordained the twelve and sent them out. So then 
we may justly, fairly, and satisfactorily conclude, that these two 
Baptist disciples of John baptised the other ten, and all others that 
came over to Jesus in his life time — for so says the text: though Jesus 
himself baptised not, but his disciples. So then it is fairly presuma- 
ble, that these two disciples baptised the ten, and then they all bap- 
tised, after being baptised by these two, and ordained by Christ. 
This being cleared, we proceed to show that the apostles baptised in 
the same way and the same sort of persons John did, and that they 
practised the same mode of baptism as John had administered to 
them, and that the mode of John and the apostles were the same 
mode. 

And that the mode of John's baptism was where there was much 
water, and in the river Jordan— and when he had come up straiiway 
«>ut of the water— now you know all this has already been proved. 
Then to prove the apostles practised the same mode as John, take 
the following scripture, Acts viii 36: "And as they went on 
their way they came to a certain water, and the Eunuch 



(0 

said, see here is water, what doth hinder me to be baptised?" 
verse 37: "And Philip said, if thou believest with all thine heart 
thou mayest. And he answered and said, 1 believe Jesus Christ is the 
Son of God — 38: And he commanded the chariot to stand still, and 
they went down both into the water, both Philip and the Eunuch, 
and he baptised him — 39: And when they were come up out of the 
water," &c. Now here the whole manner of baptism is so plainly 
set iown, that he that runs may read; for in these texts we have the 
administrator, Philip; here we have the subject on profession of faith, 
the Eunuch; here we have the mode, in the water. So it is said of 
Christ, when he was baptised by John, that when he had straitway 
come up out of the water. And it is said of Philip and the Eunuch, 
— and when they were come up out of the water. So then it is fairly 
proven that John and the apostles both baptised in the water, and not 
out of the water, as sprinklers and pourers do. And further, John 
baptised on profession of faith, saying unto the people, they should 
believe on him which was to come; that is, on Christ Je- 
sus. And here we see Philip requiring a profession of faith 
in Christ Jesus before he would baptise the Eunuch, and on 
this profession of faith in Christ Jesus lie did baptise him. 
Then John's baptism and apostolic baptism agree in all things; 
both required faith, both went into the water to baptise, both 
baptised in the water, both came up out of the water. This 
matter we deem so plain, we refuse to quote more scriptures because 
of the shortness of our limits; for although baptism were mentioned 
ten thousand times in scripture, and neither the subject nor mode 
mentioned, yet ills in all places to be referred to this plain patlera 
given, as being in all places and on all occasions by the apostles per- 
formed this way. For as some of the disciples had been baptised by 
Jolin, and they knew Jesus Christ their master had been baptised by 
John, of course when they baptised they followed John's practice in a 
river or much water where they themselves were baptised. So then 
there is no valid baptism but in much water, or in a river, or in a 
certain water, and that in the water and not out of if; then baptism 
cannot be performed out of the water, according to John's and apos- 
tolic practice, as provable from the New Testament. Now the Ke- 
hukee Baptists are just such as these — some of them were like 
John's baptised in a river; some of them were baptised in mill ponds, 
where there was much water; some of them were baptised in creeks, 
which is a certain water, he. So that John's Baptists, and the apos- 
tolic Baptists, and the Kebukee Baptists, precisely agree — baptised 
on repentance, confession of sins, and profession of faith in Christ, in 
much water. And we say again, dear brethren, there is no such 
thing as performing a scriptural baptism out of the water; but it must 
be done in the water, to come up to the mode of John and the apos- 
tles; and that it cannot be performed with a pitcher, gourd, or bason 
■ — this is clear from scripture. 

Thus in a short way having cleared our path of the brush and 
chunks that have been cast there for ages, we proceed to prove that 
all the apostolic churches were Baptist churches.. And first, it is- 



a 

clear that Jesus Christ formed the first church of the twelve; for what 
is a church? It is a congregation of faithful men and women, bapti- 
sed after repentance on a profession of their faith in Christ; and in 
which the ordinance of the Lord's Supper is duly administered, and 
the word of God preached to then); and who maintain a scriptural 
discipline. So then, the twelve disciples were, we presume, Baptists; 
we are sure that Christ and two of them were, and there is no proof 
the rest were not — they met on the eve of the Saviour's death, and 
he preached to them and administered the Supper to them — this is 
clear from scripture. About forty days after this, on the evening of 
his ascension, we find them assembled, and that Peter stood up and 
said over the number of the names of the disciples, and that they 
were about 120; these had joined themselves to the twelve, for it 
is said of them all, Acts, i. 14: "These all continued with one accord 
in prayer and supplication, with the women and Mary the mo- 
ther of Jesus, and with his brethren." This church then of baptised 
apostles in Jerusalem, was the first Christian church and for a long 
time remained the head and centre of union of all the rest; and gave 
laws and pules to all the rest, for so had Christ ordained the apostles 
to do. Now about ten days after this came on the great day of 
Pentecost, when Peter the fisherman stood up and preached to the 
vast multitude of the Jews that had attended at this great feast, from 
all the tribes of Israel and devout Jews from all nations under hea- 
ven; and three thousand were by the preaching of Peter pricked in 
their hearts. Then Peter said unto them, repent and be baptised 
every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ, for the remission of 
sins. Then they that gladly received his word were baptised, and 
the same day there were added unto them about three thousand scsuls, 
Thus we can see what kind of persons were received as members 
of the first Baptist apostolic church — such as heard Peter 
preach, such as by his preaching had been pricked in 
their hearts, such as gladly received his word of preach- 
ing, such as were baptised after gladly receiving the word. Then 
this proves that they were all persons capable of hearing preaching, 
capable of gladly receiving the word; and that additions to this first 
Christian church was by baptism, and that of such as were pricked 
in heart and capable to so hear and fee! as to cry, men and brethren 
what shall we do? And this proves, that there were no children ad- 
mitted to the first Christian church; for it is said they (these 120 and 
this 3000) continued stedfastly in the apostles' doctrine and fellow- 
ship, and in breaking bread and in prayers; which children could not 
do. Again: Peter and John went up to the temple and preached, 
Acts, iii. and iv. chapters, 4th verse: "Howbeit many of them 'which 
heard the word believed, and the number of men was about five thou- 
sand." These with all others that composed this church were he^ 
lievers, as Acts, *n\ 44, showeth: "And all that believed were togeth- 
er and had all things common." And again: Acts, iv. 32: "And the 
multitude of them that believed were of one heart and one soul," &e. 
All which proves that the first Christian cSiurch was a church of bap- 
tised believers on repentance and baptism for the remission of sins. 



sealed by faith in Christ by the Holy Ghost. And again: it is prov- 
able by the v. chapter and 14th verse: "And believers were the more 
added to the Lord, multitudes both of men and women." Tims there 
is undeniable proof that the first Christian church was a Baptist 
church and that of baptised believers, and that there was not a child 
among them, and that they are not subjects of baptism according to 
the New Testament. And it is surprisingly strange, if there had 
been children in the first Christian churches, that it is omitted through- 
out the whole New Testament; and that men and women so often 
should be mentioned as believers and members, but children not once 
in the whole history of the New Testament are mentioned as mem- 
bers of any one of the Christian churches. 

Thus we find 8120 members in the first Christian church at Jerusa- 
lem, all believing Baptists or baptised after believing — this is clear. 
Nor were these all, for *here are items in this first history of the 
Christian church, wrote by Luke the companion of Paul's travels, 
that show a still further increase — in Acts, vi. J: "And in those days 
when the disciples were multiplied, 1 ' &ic. And in the 7th verse: 
"And the word of God increased, and the number of the disciples 
multiplied in Jerusalem greatly; and a great company of the priests 
were obedient to the faith." Acts, xxi 20: "Thou seest brother, how 
man}' thousands of the Jews there are which believe, and they are all 
zealous of the law." Thus you can see, dear brethren, a fair picture 
of the first Christian church; for this church is called the church at 
Jerusalem, in Acts, ii. 47. Then by the scriptures quoted you can 
see the additions to the first apostolic church in all casts were believ- 
ers, and that by baptism. You can also see the vast quantity that 
composed this first Christian church; for their number is set forth by 
multitudes of men and women — by a great company — by the disci- 
ples being multiplied in Jerusalem greatly — by how many thousands, 
&c. Thus that the first Christian church at Jerusalem was a Bap- 
tist church, is scripturally made out; and that such, are the churches 
of the Kehukee Association, made up of baptised believers, and con- 
gregated of believing men and women for aught the ministers know; 
as was the church at Jerusalem, for aught the apostles knew. For 
there were Judas, Simon Magus, and Annanias and Sapphira unbe- 
lievers in the first Christian churches; so there may be in ours, yet 
our plan of building churches is the same as that of the apostles, out 
of baptised believers to build a Christian church; and all others are 
rejected by us if we know it, as did John the Baptist when he rejected 
the Pharisees and Sadducees. 

Our limits, dear brethren, forbid us pursuing the regular history 
of the first apostolic churches in regular succession as they rose into 
existence under the ministry of the apostles. We, therefore, must 
select a few apostolic churches to prove that the first churches were 
Biptist churches, composed of baptised believers. The second 
church we name was the church at Philippi. Paul in his travels 
having passed through Phrygia and the region of Galatia, came 
down to Troas where he had a vision to come over to Macedonia 
and help them. He set sail and came to Philippi, where he was in 



thai ciiy several days. On the Sabbath he went to the river side, 
where prayer was wont to be made. Lydia, a seller of purple, at- 
tended to Lhe prayers and things spoken of by Paul, Acts. xvi. 15: 
4lt And when she was baptised and her household,*' &e. Alter this the 
Jailer said, Sirs what must I do to be saved? And they (Paul and 
Silas] said, believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shall be sav- 
ed and thy house— verse 32: "And they spake unto him the word 
of the Lord —38: And he took them the same hour of the night and 
washed their stripes and was baptised, he and all bis straitway." 
Thus we see that Lydia and house, and Jailer and house, were 
Baptists, and formed the first members of the church at PhilippL 
For Paul's epistle to the Philippians proves there was a church at 
that place, and the opening of Lydia's heart, the Jailer's enquiry 
what he should do to be saved, their preaching the word of the 
Lord and belief in the Lord Jesus for salvation, and being baptised 
after all this, proves beyond contradiction, that the church at Phil- 
ippi was a Bapcist church, and that of believers both the Acts oi the 
Apostles and the epistles prove. Some have made their quibbles, 
saying, these must have been sprinkled as they were baptised in the 
night. We answer, was there not a river hard by the city, where 
Paul went to pray, & where Lydia attended to the things spoken by 
Paul? And was it not as nigh to baptise there, as to pray and preach 
there? Such foolish quibbles are not worth answering. Thus there 
was a Baptist church at Philippi, and such an one too as those that 
compose theKehukee Association. 

The third church we name is the church at the city of Ephesus. 
That there was a church in this city, both Paul's epistles and John's 
Revelations prove; and that it was a Baptist church, is clear also. 
While Apollos was ai Corinth — Acts, ix. 1 —Paul having passed 
through the upper coast, came to Ephesus. There he found twelve 
of John's disciples, these were Baptists of John's make; he gave 
them the Holy Ghost by laying his hands on them, and they spake 
with tongues and prophecied. Verse IS: "And many that believ- 
ed came, and confessed, and shewed their deeds" — burnt their books, 
&c. Verse 20. '-So mightily grew the word of God, and prevail- 
ed." You, dear bretheru, cannot help seeing here that John's 
twelve Baptists were the first materials of this church; and that the 
character of those that were added to them by Paul's two years 
preaching at Ephesus, were such men that confessed and shewed 
their deeds, believed, burnt their book?, &e. which was the very 
character of the twelve Baptists of John's make, such as confessed 
their sins, &c. baptised in Jordan. And such success Paul had here 
in preaching, that it drew from the historian Luke these expressions; 
4, So mightly grew the word of God, and prevailed." We cite yon a* 
further proof of this fact, Paul's epistle to this church, and several 
items found in the Acts. So then, this was a Baptist church of men 
that confessed their sins, shewed their past bad deeds, believed, &c. 
just such are the churches of the Kehukee Association. 

The fourth church we shall name is that at the city of Corinth, 
Paul's two epi?tles prove that there was a church at this place. 
Acts, xviii. 4: "And he (Paul) reasoned in the synagogue every 
Sabbath, and persuaded the Jews and the Greeks"— verse. 8: "And 



•14 

Crispus the chief ruler of the synagogue, believed on the Lord with 
sdi his house: and many 'of the Corinthians hearing, believed and 
were baptised." Now this is so plain that it needs no comment, 
that the church at Corinth was a church of baptised believers, and 
that they became so by Paul's preaching in this city, and that they 
first believed and then were baptised on a profession of their faith in 
the Lord Jesus — this is as clear as noon day. To prove which, read 
first epistles of Paul to the Corinthians* i. 13: "Or were ye baptised 
id she name of Paul"— -verse 15: "Lest any should say, I baptised 
in my own name"—- 10: ''And I baptised also the household of 
Stephanos.' With abundant other satisfactory proofs in both the 
epistles, that the church at Corinth was a Baptist church of baptised 
believers.. Of these four being Baptist churches there can be no 
doubly and that they were just such as now compose the Kehukee 
Association. Our limits forbid our further particularising individual 
churches; and as there is satisfactory evidence that these four were 
all Baptist churches of baptised believers, so it necessarily follows 
all the ret:.i of the churches must be; as we can hardly think that the 
apostles baptised more than one way, and that was with John's bap- 
tism; which was the same baptism thai they bad been baptised with 
as well as their divine master, and in the same way, with much 
water. 

Now, dear brethren, we have told you that the Acts of the Apos- 
tles was the first history of the Christian church and of the Christian 
religion for 31 years. So then during this 31 years there are self- 
evidpnt proofs in this history, that the gospel was preached and had 
spread throughout Judea. Samaria, GaMilee, and by far the greater 
part of Lesser Asia; throughout Greece, and most all the islands of 
the iEgean sea— Cyprus, Crete, Salami?', &c. — good part of the ser* 
coast of Africa, at Rome in Italy, Autioch in Syria, Ephesus, Jop- 
pa, Thessalonica, Berea. Icooium, Derbe, Corinth, at another Anti- 
och which was in Pysidia, at Sarati and Lydia, &c. &c. Disciples 
are mentioned at Damascus, Lystria, Troas, Athens, Tyre, and Cesa- 
rea, while the church at Jerusalem remained the principal seat of 
Christianity, where thousands are said to believe. And this first 
history furnishes us with facts to prove that there was a Baptist 
church at Jerusalem, and a church at Rome; for Paul says their faith 
was spoken of throughout the world — a church at Antioeh, at Cor- 
inth, at Galatia, at Ephesus, at Philippi, at Colosse, at Thessaioni- 
ea, at Crete — *he church in Cencherea, the church in the house of 
Pricilla and Aquilla, at Sardis, at Philadelphia, at Smyrna, at Per- 
garrius, at Thvatira, and at Laodicea. Here are eighteen churches 
of which the history of the Acts of the Apostles, and the Revela- 
tions of John the divine, prove existed at those places; and there are 
hundreds of items and coincidences scattered in this first histeiy of 
the Christian church, to prove that all these were churches of bapti- 
sed believers— such as now compose the Kehukee Association. 

But it may be asked what kind of Baptists these were? We an- 
swer, Paul says, "one Lord, one faith, one baptism." And the 
scripture again mentions the baptism of water, and the baptism of 
the Holy Ghost. Water baptism was the commission of John — Ho- 
ly Ghost baptism was the commission of Christ; this last ceased with 






if 

the apostolic ministry. Then during t he ministry of John water 
-.baptism was the one baptism; for the first time Christ adminis?»red 
Holy Ghost baptism was on the apostles after his death — then gave 
he them power to administer it by laying on. (heir hands. Now the 
Quakers say, that Holy Ghost baptism is this one baptism. This is 
not so—Acts, xix: there you can see twelve men baptised by John's 
baptism, who received the Holy Ghost by the laying on of the hands 
of Paul, after water baptism. This agrees with John's testimony of 
Christ. But here is a text that scatters all before it, Acts, x 47: "Can 
aoy man forbid water that these should not be baptised, which have 
received the Holy Ghost as well as we— -verse 4S: And he comman- 
ded them to be baptised in the name of the Lord Jesus." Fhen it 
is as plain as the nose on your face, that Holy Ghost baptism was not 
necessary nor never intended to make Christians, whether it went 
before or come after water baptism; but was only intended to give 
gifts, tongues, prophecies, working of miracles, and as a sign of the 
mission of Christ and his apostles, &c. &c For the apostle- were 
Christians and preachers before they were baptised with the Holy 
Ghost, all which in all cases you will s^e clear by consulting and 
comparing the scriptures. So then the Quakers are. mistaken, and 
water baptism is the one baptism alluded to by Paul, whether going 
before or following after Holy Ghost baptism. And he calls it one 
baptism because it is the one haptism given of God to John to admi- 
nister; -he calls it the one baptism because it is the one mode given 
by God to John, for \f God did not give John the mode, how would 
he have known how to administer it, since he had never seen it nor 
heard of its ever being practised before since the world began? It is 
called the one baptism because the baptism of John, Christ, and the 
apostles were ail the one and same mode — much water, certain wa- 
ter, and river water baptism; and therefore the apostle calls out one 
faith and one Lord also, because one^faiJh and one Lord were requi- 
red both by John and the apostles in order to baptism. Then John's 
baptism, the apostolic baptism, and the Kehukee baptism are the 
same — one water, one faith, and one Lord baptism, as the whole te- 
nor of the New Testament will show; and although there may be 
baptised unbelievers in the Kehukee churches, yet this don't alter 
the case, for there was an unbelieving Simon Magus baptised by 
Peter, yet Peter (see the scripture) baptised him on the profession of 
his faith; but he lied, as some do in the Kehukee churches — yet God 
did not give it to Peter to know men's hearts but by their fruits, 
nor to know Simon was an unbeliever; nor ha* he given it to the Ke- 
hukee ministers. It has been said by an enemy, that there are 
drunkards, fornicators, and unclean persons in the churches compo- 
sing the Kehukee Association. — we could heartily wish that all oth- 
er churches and sects were clear of them and we too; but we would 
say, put all such men from among yourselves and then throw stones 
at us, but fur the present abstain from such calumnies, such serf- 
righteous and self-conceit. Read Paul's epistles to the Corinthians, 
and see if there were not drunkards, fornicators, unclean and inces- 
tuous persons in that church; which is a good proof that the Kehu- 
kee churches are just such as this apostolic Baptist church at Corinth* 
and not sister to the churches of the pharasaical order, who strut la 



16 

broadcloth begged fry hirelings, Hvhd love the feathers more than the 
goose, and cry, 1 thank God I am not as other men. Such a man 
John ihe Baptist, or the apostles, would not let in (heir churches; 
an! rye don't want ihem in the Kehukee churches, for they are no$ 
of the old Baptist breed, but dogs and sorcerers that bark aland lick 
the sores of God's people, that are to be left out of the city when 
Christ comes to make up his jewels of penitent, broken hearted, sin, 
confessing, obedient baptised believers. 

We now in a short way, beloved brethren, come to the last thing 
propped; to show that no church according; to the scriptures has a 
right to be called theChristian church, but a Baptist church of bapti- 
sed believers — and that none have, according to the scriptures, a 
right to claim to be of the Christian religion, but a Baptist who has 
repented and confessed his sins, and been baptised on the profession 
of his faith in Christ. We have fully shown that the first Christian 
churches were Baptists, of baptised believers; this you are forced 
from the scripture fproofs to give up. If so, can you say, dear bre- 
thren, how you now can form and build a Christian church in this 
dyy'i like those of old time, but by making u*e of the same kind of 
materials, of the same kindof tools and workmen, and the same plan 
by which the former apostolic workmen worked by? We say it can- 
not be done, for in this day if any man will build a Christian church 
he mn*l buihl on the same foundation, use the same materials, same 
.kind of workmen, same plan," and construct in ail things according to 
\he first pattern showed in the mount, or else the tabernacle or tern- 
pje will not be like the former. As proof we offer, 1 Peter, ji. 4, 
5: "To whom coming as unto a living stone, disallowed indeed of 
men but chosen of God and precious." This coming here mention- 
ed nvans believing in Christ, by which he (Christ the stone) gives a 
sinner life; and then, 5th verse: "Ye also as lively stones are built 
lip a spiritual house (not a natural house) and holy priesthood, to of- 
fer up spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God by Jesus Christ — verse 
6: Behold J lay in Zion a chief corner stone, elect, precious, and he 
that bdievefh on him (on this stone, (Christ) shall not be confound- 
ed. " Read the whole chapter. Read 1 Corinthians, iii. 11, 12; 
>'F*r other foundations can no man lay than that which is laid, which 
i« Jesus Christ--! 2: Now if any man build on this foundation gold, 
silver, precious stones, wood, hay stubble," &e. Now in the above 
verses we are shown (as in twenty more we could cite) the manner 
of building Christian churches by the apostles; Jesus Chris? the foun- 
dtffoh, (he sinner coming to him for life by faith, and then after re- 
ceiving that life from him built up a spiritual house, &c. Then all 
the materials put in this house are, men made spiritual by the opera- 
tion of God's spirit on them, then holy priesthood, then spiritual 
men; then able to offer spiritual sacrifices; so that natural men were 
not, and now cannot, be fit for the church of God; and a Chri-tian 
church cannot he built out of natural men, and thej' have no right 
there whil^ in that slate, for they are not plants of God's planting, 
and therefore shall be rooted up. Paul is plainer. 1 he Christian 
church is builded according to his plan, Christ the foundation and the 
materials gold, silver, precious stones; by this he. intends sinners, 
meliel in the fire of repentance and softened into penitence and com- 



17 

pliance to God's will in the work of God's grace on their hearts, and 
stampt with king Jesus' image to make them current and passable in 
all God's dominions in earth and heaven, as gold or silver, suitable 
also to he put in any building to beautify, enrich, and adorn it; and 
precious stones, polished by the hand of God, '-for ye are his work- 
manship, created in Christ Jesus unto good work;" "ye are God's 
fruilding; 5 ' "i will refine them as silver is refined;" "and try them as 
gold is tried. " For further proof read Revelations, that Paul by 
gold, silver, precious stones, meant believers in Christ as the only fit 
materials for the church of God, and that by wood, hay stubble, he 
meant children, women and men in their natural state, as unfit for the 
Christian church. So then national churches are not Christian 
churches; nor is a church that is composed of children and believers, 
for children are not lively stones, have never come to Christ the life- 
giving stone, but are dead stones and therefore not fit for the Chris- 
tian church. Nor is a church composed of believers and seekers, 
and natural men and women and children, a spiritual house; nor can 
such natural persons offer up spiritual sacrifices, being natural and 
dead in trespasses and sins, and without faith cannot please God in 
that state. So then none but believers have spiritual life, none but 
they are lively stones, none but they have come to Christ the life- 
giving stone, none but they have been refined as silver and tried as 
goid, and polished as precious stones by the hand of God, and so 
were the only materials in the apostolic age to build the Christian 
church; and even so now, the same and the same only, fit materials 
for a Christian church; all others are no more fit in the apostle's es- 
teem than wood, hay stubble, to build the Christian church out of. 
Then a Baptist church composed of believers has the only rightful 
claim to be called the Christian church; because it is now what the 
former Christian church was, according to the New Testament. 
And such are the churches composing the Kchukee Association, as 
we have shown heretofore. The text shows us that the Christian 
church was a stone building, built of lively stones; and can you make 
a stone building out of wood, hay stubble? No, you know it cannot 
be<done. Then no more can you make a Christian church out of 
natural men, women and children. Then if Moses and Solomon had 
built the tabernacle and temple out of wood, hay stubbie, how would 
God have liked it since he gave the pian of both, for both were built 
as a dwelling place for 7 God? So is the Christian church, she is built 
on earth as a house, tabernacle, and temple of the living God; a host 
of scriptures prove this. Then if God would not have liked it at the 
hands of Moses and Solomon to have dwelt in a straw tabernacle and 
temple, how will he now like to dwell in a hay stubble chuirh? 
Consider of this, ye hay and stubble builders, and learn to go by 
God's plan, or else he will burn up your work; as he would no doubt 
have done that of Moses and Solomon, had they riot gone by his plan. 
Now we know that the first Christian church is called the bride, 
the Lamb's wife; and we further know, that love is the ground work 
of man and wife — do children love Christ? Do natural men and wo- 
[Jave they given their hearts and their all up to 



18 
him in love? Have they taken him as their all, the chief object of 
their affections, and become willing to suffer for his sake, and yield 
obedience to him, his laws, rule and government, and make his will 
theirs, and in all things say— husband, thy will be done? No, bre- 
thren, we know better than this — that the carnal mind is enmity 
against God. Then children, and natural men and women, while in 
that state, are no part of the Christian church; nor are they the 
bride, the Lamb's wife; but the believers are taught to love him, be- 
cause they see he first loved them, and have been made willing in the 
day of his powerful love to give vp their all to him, and yield obedi- 
ence to him; and so to love and serve him all the days of their life, 
and suffer with him and bear his cross through good and evil report 
as their lot may fall. And thus when Christ wins the sinner's heart 
by ills overpowering love, at the day of conversion the match and 
promise of roirriage is made; yet this sinner has no right to be call- 
ed a Christian, nor his religion the Christian religion, until the bap- 
tismal rite of matrimony is administered to him; then he loses his 
maiden nam a sinner, and puts on from that day the name of his hus- 
band Christian, and then is entitled to be called Christian and his re- 
ligion the Christian religion; and such men and women congregated 
i »gether the Christian church and their religion the Christian relU 
gion, according to the New Testament, and is fully provable there- 
from by the whole tenor. 

But if a wile goes a whoreing and prostitutes herself to another 
ra\n, and takes up with him as her husband, and is governed by his 
laws and rules, and owns him her head, she forfeits her claim as a wife 
of the first husband by the law of the gospel, and he may put her 
away. So any Christian church that owns any head but Christ, and 
is governed by the laws and rules of such a head, whoever he may 
be, whether king or Pope, forfeits her claim to Christ her former 
husband, and becomes a prostitute and a committer of fornication 
with such kings, Popes, and heads. This is the idea that runs thro' 
the whole book of the Revelations of John the divine, concerning the 
church of anti-Christ, and he gives it as a distinguishing mark of the 
church of anti-Christ — read that book as proof. Thus the Roman 
Catholic church, which was once a Christian church, has gone a 
whoreing and married the Pope in 006, and has since owned him as 
the head of that church, has yielded herself to obey his rules, laws 
and canons, and the laws and rules of kings for her doctrines, ordi- 
nances and discipline, and rejected those of Christ her former hus- 
band; and thus she is said to be a whore, and a committer or fornica- 
tion with the kings of the earth, and to make herself drunk with the 
blood of the saints. And thus for these and a hundred other scrip- 
ture reasons we could give, has the Catholic church forfeited her 
claim to be scripturally called the Christian church; and her scripture 
name since that date has been Mystery — Babylon the great — the mo- 
ther of harlots — and abominations of the earth. This is truth, for 
she has committed whoredom with near 200 Popes, and fornication 
with not much less than 300 kings of different nations. Then Christ 
lias out her away as a whore, and given her in the scripture her name, 



. 19 . 

and disowns her as his wife, and given her up to her paramour — and 
the saints shall in a short time fronl this burn her flesh with fire, as 
she has burned many thousands of them — -this we seal as truth of 
prophecy. 

Suppose a Christian church should take a decanter of water, in- 
stead of wine, and administer that in the Lord's Supper — would she" 
not forfeit her claim to be a Christian church, by thus perverting the 
ordinance of her Lord, since water used in thesacranient could not 
show any semblance of the blood of Christ, shed under the New Tes- 
tament for the remission of sins; nor show the Saviour's death until 
he come; nor bring to the remembrance of the communicants his 
bloody passion and love for them? For in so doing the whole design 
of that solemn ordinance would be perverted, and the Lord's request 
of his church violated and her disobedience manifested.. This we 
say, dear brethren, to you to fortify your minds against some publi- 
cations which we have seen of water communion Baptists, tending to 
such a state of things. We say such a church would be unworthy of 
the Christian name, and violate the conjugal lie of bleeding love, and 
destroy the glass set up for the wife of Christ to view every now and 
then her beloved, dying, bleeding, absent husband, and thereby to 
remember him and his bleeding love to her since his ascension. 
Equally so those who practice sprinkling and pouring for baptism 
pervert the whole design of that ordinance; for baptism in the scrip- 
ture is set forth as a burial, or as being buried with Christ by bap- 
tism; and is there not as much likeness between water and the blood 
of Christ, as there is between sprinkliug and pouring to make a buri- 
al, or to bury a dead man? About the same, and you have as much 
right to change the one as the other. Thus those who change im« 
mersion for sprinkling change in the same degree wine for water, and 
thereby pervert the very design of baptism; for baptism was designed 
to show our death to sin with Christ, and our resurrection with him 
into newness of life; and when defined by Peter proves the fact, for 
he says baptism is not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but 
the answer of a good conscience. And baptism cannot be' the an- 
swer of a good conscience to children, for they have no conscience 
about it. So then this proves there was no children in the first apos- 
tolic churches. And as to baptism by immersion, there is as much 
likeness between that and a burial and resurrection, as there is be- 
tween wine and th« blood of Christ. So, dear brethen, maintain 
both as you now have them inviolate, and commit these sacred or- 
dinances to the next generation as you have received them, and as 
set done in the scripture. And we say, if you change them you will 
be unworthy of the name of a Christian church, and your religion 
destitute of the true signs of the Christian religion, and you found 
disobedient to God. We are sorry, dear and beloved brethren, that 
we have had to cramp ourselves ail the way through, in keeping 
back the many proofs which would have made this momentous sub- 
ject much clearer; and that after doing all we could in cramping our- 
selves, we feel we have trampled on our limits and the funds of the 
churches — yet hope the subjects treated on will make \ou amends 



to 

for that little balance that it will take between publishing a short and 
a long letter. While in the name of our Lord Jesus we persuade 
you to let the scriptures be your guide in all religious matters, neither 
add to nor diminish from them, make your hearts the library for them, 
carry them out in principles and practice in all your lives, dealings, 
and conversation at home and abroad; live in peace, union and fel- 
lowship, contending for the faith once delivered to the saints in the 
holy scriptures; stand fast and immovable from them, always abound- 
ing in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know your labor is not 
in vain in the Lord. And may God's abundant grace be upon you, 
and aid and assist you to do all his will and finish your several cour- 
ses with joy to yourselves and praise to his name, and the good of 
the saints that shall follow after us. Farewell. 



Tarboro' Press. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



Kehukee Baptist Association, 

HELD AT 

GREAT SWAMP MEETING HOUSE, 

PITT COUNTY, N. C. 
Commencing Saturday before the first Sunday in October, 1S3G. 



SATURDAY, October 1st, 1836. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was delivered (in failure 
of those that were appointed,) by Elder Joshua Law- 
rence, from Eeelesiastes, iv. chapter, latter clause of the 
12th verse: "A three-fold cord is not quickly broken." — 
Prayer, by Elder William Hyman. 

2. The delegates from the churches then assembling, 
the Association was opened with prayer, by Elder Wil- 
liam Hyman, when Elder William Hyman was chosen 
Moderator; and Elder Joseph Biggs, Clerk; who called to 
his assistance, Brethren Joseph D. Biggs, and R. M. G. 
Moore. 

3. Letters from 34 churches were read, and the dele- 
gates therefrom were enrolled; and the representation 
stated in the table of churches. 

4. Brethren in the ministry, from sister Associations, 
(present,) were invited to seats with us; when Elders 
Thomas Dupree and Josiah Smith, seated themselves. 

5. Petitionary letters for membership in this Associa- 
tion were called for; none were received. 



Names of Churches and 
Counties where situated. 



1. Baregrass, Martin, — 

2. Blount s Cr% Beau fort, - 

3. Coivenjock, Currituck, 

4. Conoho, Martin — 

5- Coneto, Edgecombe, — 

6. Concord, Washington, 

7. Cross Roads, Edgecombe 

8. Cedar Island, Carteret, — 

9. Deep Crttk. Halifax 

10. Falls Tdr Ricer, Nash, 

11. Flat Swamp, Pitt, 



MINISTERS &. DELEGATES. 



12. Flatly Cr'k, Pasquotank- 

13. Frying Pan. Tyrrell — 

14. Goost. Creek, Beau fort, — 

15. Grtat Swamp, Pitt, — 

16. Hunting Quarters, Car 

tent — 

17. Kehukee, Halifax, — 

18. Lawrence's M. H. Edge 

coinbp, 
19 Little Alligator .Tyrrell,- 

20. Morattock, Washington,-^ 

21. jYorih Creek, Beaufoif 
Q2.No.Maltdmuskeet,tiyile,\ 

23. Old Ford, Beaufort, — 

24. Picot MH Martin, — 

25. Powell's Point, Curri 
tuck, -=* 

26. Pungo, Beaufort. — 
27- Scuppemong, Tyrreli. t 

28. So- Mattamuskeet, Hyde 

29. Skewarkey, Martin, 
30.Smf//wic/c'sCr'A,Martin- 

31. Sound Side, Tyrrell, — 

32. Spring Green, Martin,— 

33- Tarboro', Edgecombe, — 

34. Washington, Beaufort 

35. While Plains, Beaufort, 
Edge 



James Harrison, Abram Peal, 
Joseph Tripp,* J»hn Et. Philpot,* 
SAMUEL TATUM,* 
jame* Mayo, John Bryan,* 
Richard E. Rives, John H. Daniel, 
MICAJAH AMBROSE,* Daniel 

Clifton* 
WILLIAM HITMAN, Joseph J 

Pippen, 
Daniel Harriss, Silas Lupton, 
William Whitehead, 
Robert Sorey * Joseph 5; Battle, 
LUKE WARD, Wm. W. K.Phil- 
pot, Samuel Keel, 



b 53; 



? a, 



fames Potter, Malachi Linton,* 
John Whitchard, Hardy Whitchard, 



36. Williams' M. H 
combe,— 



Abram Gaskill, Jordan Davis, 
John Shields,* Reuben Higgs, 
JOSHUA LAWRENCE, Richard 

Harrison, 
Lemuel Basnigfrt, 
Jacob Wilkinson, Wilson Mizell, 
Noah Gaskill, William Price, 

John Hodges, David Singleton, 
Joe! Smithwick,* Joshua Robason. 

|lacob Beasley,* William Snow,* 
Henry S. Davis, Samu I Clark, 
JOSEPH BARNES,* 
GEORGE W. C ARROW AN,* H 

B. Swindell * R. M. G Moore, 
JOSEPH BIGG v Jos D Biggs, 
MICAJAH PERRY, HUMPHREV 

STALLING?, 
Zebulon Kemp,* Abram J. Swain, 
William Gray, Stephen Outter 

bridge,* 
Cofield King, Ely Porter,* 
WILLIAM SMAW,* Levin Wal 

lace, 
MILES EVERI1T,* Jonathan 

Wallace, 

David Bradley,* Henry Morgan, 
Total, 



t> S3 



R- ?- 



2 2 

l| 
3 



r 



1213 



17il8 



57 



29 

32 

72 
51 

38 

36 

40 

42 
24 

84 

67 



#Cts 

1 00 
1 50 
1 00 
1 00 
1 50 

1 00 

1 00 

2 00 

1 00 

2 65 



20 
14 
7tf 

4C 

1361 

64 
6 
83 
49 
22 
10 
34 



2 00 

75 
70 

1 00 

1 50 



1 



2 00 
1 00 

1 50 

75 

I 1 50 

1 50 

50 
1 00 

75 
1 20 



2 10 

2 00 



22 
25 


1 00 
I 00 


41 

46 


I 1 00 

1 50 


14 


1 50 


46 


1 00 


46 
1513 


1 00 

44 05 



NOTE. Pastors of Churches, and other ordained Ministers, ar- in CAPITALS; unordain- 
ed Ministers in italic; thtse marked thus * were not present; fr»m Churches marked thus, t 
we received no intelligence, in that case iheir number stands as last vear; Dashes — denote 
no Pastors, the last column shows th? contributions from the Churches to the Association fund. 



6. Letters of correspondence, from sister Associations, 
were called for: when one was handed in bv Elder Thom- 
as Dupree, from the Contentnea Association, the same 
read, which was accompanied with 40 copies of their last 



3 

Minutes. Another was handed in from the Little River 
Association & read; accompanied by 40 copies of their last 
Minutes. Also, another was handed in from the White 
Oak Association, by Elder Josiah Smith, requesting to 
open a correspondence with this Association, with 30 
copies of their Minutes, and read; it was Resolved, that 
we correspond wilh them. 

7. The following committees were appointed, (viz:) El- 
ders Joshua Lawrence, Thomas Dupree, and William 
Hyman, to examine the circular letter; Brethren Joseph 
J. Pippen and Joseph S. Battle on Finance, — Joseph D, 
Biggs, to prepare a letter of correspondence to the Con- 
tentnea Association; R. M. G. Moore, to the Little River 
Association; Elder Joshua Lawrence, to the White Oak 
Association; all to Report on Monday next. 

8. Elders Joshua Lawrence, Thomas Dupree and Jo- 
siah Smith, were requested, (by private ballot) to occupy 
the stage by preaching on the morrow, and divine worship 
to commence at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

The Association was then adjourned, until Monday next, 
9 o'clock, A. M. with prayer by Elder Joshua Lawrence. 

SUNDAY, October 2nd, 1836. 

Elder Josiah Smith, introduced the service of the day, 
and preached from Titus, 2nd chapter 11th verse; "for 
the grace of God, that bringeth salvation hath appeared 
unto all men." Elder Joshua Lawrence followed, and 
preached from 1 Tim. 1st chapter 15th verse: "this is a 
faithful saying, and worthy of all accepiation, that Jesus 
Christ came into the world to save sinners!" Prayer by 
Elder Thomas Dupree, who dismist the congregation, we 
hope that from the faithfulness of the truths delivered, and 
the attention of the people, that good will follow. 

9. Monday the Association assembled, and was opened 
with prayer by Elder Joseph Biggs, and proceeded to bu- 
siness; on motion the Constitution, and Decorum of th$ 
Association was read. 

10. Resolved, That our next Association beheld at Law- 
rence's Meeting House, Edgecombe county, to commence 
Saturday before the 1st Sunday in October, 1837, com- 
mencing at 11 o'clock, A. M. and that Elder Joseph 
Biggs, preach the Introductory Sermon to that body, and 
in case of his failure, Elder Joseph Barnes. 

11. The committee appointed to examine the circular 
letter, reported that they had done so, and thai they had 
omitted some things, and recommended that it, be read a§ 



4 

it was amended, in this Association; which was done, and it 
was received and ordered to be attached tothes< Minnies. 

12. A letter prepared to the Little River Association, 
was handed in, read, and approved, and signed, and Elders 
John H. Daniel and Micajah Perry, appointed our mes- 
sengers to them. 

Another, prepared to the Contentnea Association, was 
handed in, and read, and approved, ami Elders Joshua 
Lawrence and William Hyman, appointed our messengers 
to them. 

Elder Joshua Lawrence, who was appointed on Satur- 
day last, to write to the White Oak Association, Reported, 
that he had not had time to do so. It was therefore Re- 
solved, that he be requested to write one, under the sig- 
nature of the Moderator and Clerk, and that Brethren 
Richard E. Rives and William Hyman, be appointed to 
convey it as our messengers to that Association. 

13. Elder John H. Daniel, is requested to prepare a 
circular letter, for our next Association, with leave to call 
in aid, and choose his subject. 

14. The committee of Finance Reported: 
That they find in the hands of the treasurer at the close of 

last Association the sum of, - - $94 77 

Received in contributions from the churches of this Asso- 
ciation, - - - 44 92| 



Making, - - - $139 69£ 

Paid for transcribing the Minutes of l^st year, and recor- 
ding one copy on our record, and superintending the 
press, and distributing them to the sister Associations 
and churches as usual the sum of, $10 00 

For paying for the printing of 600 copies, 30 00 — 40 00 

Balance now in the hands of the treasurer, $99 69§ 

The Association concurred with the report. 

15. Resolved, That Elder Joseph Biggs be requested 
to transcribe the Minutes, and prepare them for the press, 
and have 1000 copies printed, and record one copy on our 
records; and distribute them to the Association, and chur- 
ches as- usual, and that he be paid fifteen dollars for his 
services in attending to the same. 

The Association was then adjourned to the time and 
place appointed, with prayer by Eider Joshua Lawrence. 

N. B. Great harmony and unison has prevailed in this 
Association, and she continues established on the old gos- 
pel platform. WILLIAM HYMAN, Moderator. 
JOS. BIGGS, Clerk. 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 

To the churches whom we represent. 

Dearly Beloved Brethren: Alter enjoying the high privilege 
granted to us by our heavenly Father, of holding sweet counsel to- 
gether at another of our annual meetings, we have thought proper 
to address you, according to our usual custom on such occasions, by 
way of circular letter. And in casting about for a subject to intro- 
duce to your consideration, none has presented itself to our minds 
with more force pernaps than the one growing out of that pre- 
sented to your notice in our last year's circular. 

We therein endeavored to prove from the Bible that the first 
Christians were Baptists; the first churches Baptist churches, just 
such as these composing the Kehokee Association; and that no other 
Church beside a Baptist church, organized upon the apostolical 
plan, was entitled to the appellation of Christian church. 

In order then to continue the meditation on this subject, (since the 
churches in the Kehukee Association are identified in principle and 
practice with those in the apostolic age of the world,) we piopose 
briefly to inquire still further into the nature and character of 'a 
Christian Baptist church; to ascertain whether or not, we can yet 
find on this hallowed ground any streams of consolation for weary 
or heavy laden sinners, or encouraging prospects to the child of 
God, — We propose noticing first, the character of a church, and 
then the character of thai opposition which she is to encounter. 
Our notice of a church will be such as is exhibited under a two- 
fold appearance, (viz:) 

1. In a stale oi leanness, when the clouds of famine and sorrow 
gather thick, and fast around and obscure the horizon from her 
view, so as to prevent the reconciled countenance, and beatific 
smiles of the sun of righteousness, to be by her beheld for a season. 

2. In an ingathering or prosperous condition; when copious show- 
ers of grace are distilled from heaven upon the elect, and they are 
rushing into the fold of Christ, like lost and hungry sheep. 

First, then we take into consideration, the church in a cold, and 
barren state; such a situation, for instance as has been experienced, 
by many belonging to the Kehukee Association, for several years 
past; and appears likely to endure, lor some time to ocme, and while 
meditating on this part of the subject our minds are very naturally 
carried back, to a similarly period of time, when one of old was 
made to exclaim, "0 my leanness, my leanness, wo unto me," Isa- 
iah xxi v. 16. Likewise Jeremiah was bound to lament, because, 
<k from the daughter of Zion, all her beauty is departed; her princes 
are become iike harts that find no pasture, and they are gone 
without strength before the pursuer."— Lam. 1. 6 Such was a si- 
milar state of things, brethren, when the church was heard again to 
exclaim, ''For these things I weep; mine eye, mine eye runneth 
down with water, because the comforter that shouldrelieve my soul 
is far from me. Zion spreadeth forth her hands, and there is none to 
help her; the Lord hath commanded concerning Jacob, that adver- 
saries should be round about him." Lam. 1. 16. — Thus brethren we 



6 

learn that notwithstanding the truth, that the church at times is re^ 
duced to this extremity, yet that it. is nothing more or less, than 
the purpose of God, for it to be so. The testimony of David is very 
clear on the point wherein he says: "the Lord irieth the righteous " 
Psalms, 11.5; and a confirmation of this trial, accompanied by a word 
of encouragement is also given by St. Peter who says, '"Beloved, 
think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, 
as though some strange thing happened unto you: But rejoice, in- 
asmuch as ye are partakers of Christ's sufferings, that wuen his glory- 
shall be revealed, ye may be glad also with exceeding joy.'* 1 Pe- 
ter, 4 12, 13. —David agiin says, "thou lewdest th^m with the 
bread of tears; and givelh them tears to drink*- in great measure^ 
thou makesl us a strife unto our neighbors: and our enemies 
laugh among themselves. Tiirn us again, God of hosts, and cause 
thy face to shine; and we shall be saved." Psalms, SO 5, 6, 7 — is not 
such the stale of the church now, brethren? but this uncomfortable 
situation is unalterable until the set time to favor Zion arrives, for 
God until such time is represented to coyer himself with a cloud; 
therefore saith Jeremiah, "thou hath covered thyself with a cloud, 
that our prayer should not pass through." Lam. 3. 44. And how 
applicable to some is the following in such a time of famine, deser- 
tion, and error: " My people hath been lost sheep; their shepherds 
have caused them to go astray, they have turned them away on the 
mountains, they have gone from mountain to hill, they have for- 
gotten their resting-place." Jeremiah, 50. 6\ Nevertheless there is 
some consolation in the thought, that such of God's people as ar$ 
thus circumstanced, yet sooner or later will return to the true fold, 
and feed as in times past, upon the sincere milk of the word of God; 
continue stedfastly in the apostles' doctrine, and the fellowship of 
the saints. Descending 10 particulars, during such a general state of 
leanness seen in the church, we find the brethren cold toward each 
other, and dull of apprehension generally in divine things. It is 
apparently with the utmost difficulty, that they can so far discharge 
their christian duties as to sing a hymn of praise to God, commence, 
or continue the practice of family worship, or audibly pray in pub- 
lic or private. A great many difficulties have to be surmounted, if 
they are enabled to break loose from their farms, or their mer- 
chandize, or secular avocations of what ever kind they may be, and 
repair to the meeting house, or place appointed for the worship of 
God; and when there, a|most every other subject, arrest their aU 
tention in preference to that of Christianity, and the object of their 
meeting; and their consultation is frequently held upon the various 
topics of the day, however unedifymg they may be, until the min- 
ister by rising in the pulpit for the purpose of commencing divine 
service, drives (hem into silence. But alas, he at best generally 
speaking is as little qualified to feed the sheep, as they are disposed 
to receive food, and the whole scene passes off without much inte- 
rest, instead of producing that thrilling sensation in the minds of his 
audience so evidently manifested when the Holy Ghost displays hi$ 
power on the earth, darting keen conviction to the sinner, impart- 
ing comfort to the broken hearted, giving rest to the mourning 
soul, and more strength of faith to the advanced christian. We 
say instead of this, but little interest is even evinced on either side.. 



f 

and the congregation, so soon as dispersed, return to their fond 
and worldly pursuits, with scarcely a serious though?., about what 
has passed. And now bn-'hren we nave gotten about to the 
worst, when the world appears to he wondering after the beast; and 
the church reduced to a mere remnant; her ministrations of the 
word of life thinly attended; her fait)* and practice almost univer- 
sally condemned; no ingatherings or prospects of any; the members 
gradually diminishing and the profession of human appearances like- 
ly to become extinct. The whole head is sick, and the whole heart 
is faint, langour and debility has nearly covered the body; disease 
has taken deep root in the system; famine stares the victim in the 
face, and hope the last link in the life of man, has nearly worn away. 

Such is a faint description of a church in a state of leanness, and 
such may be about the situation of those composing the Kehukee 
Association at this time; brethren we leave it with you to judge of 
Ihe comparison. 

And now if the success of the cause depended upon the wisdom, 
the will, or the ability of man in the smallest degree whatever; or 
any other principle, or nature, short of the power and energy of him, 
who sitteth king forever in the heavens; then we should evident- 
ly despair of it, when viewed in such unpropitious light; and be in- 
duced already to account it as amongst the things that were. But 
§o unlike the nature of any human enterprize is this cause, that it 
can never be defeated: and when we generally suppose it to be on 
the very brink of destruction, then suddenly, is it likely to appear 
in the prosperous condition of its pristine, and God-like majesty, 
and beauty; ciusing the wonder and astonishment of its enemies, 
and high admiration of its friends. 

And this brings us to the consideration of that state of the church 
represented in our second division of the su ject, when God pours 
out his spirit so profusely upon her, that all is joy and gladness with- 
in, and sorrow and sighing for a time flee away. — When the church 
is about to experience this happy change of condition, allusion is 
frequently made to her former state of leanness as in Psalms, 
33. IS, 19: u Beho|d, the eye of the Lord is upon them that fear 
him, upon them that hope in his mercy; to deliver their soul from 
death, and to keep them alive in famine." Allusion is made to her 
former condition, with the promise of better things, to come attach- 
ed, when God says through his prophet Isaiah, 54. 78: <k For a small 
moment have I forsaken thee; hut with great mercies will 1 gather 
thee. In a little wrath I hid my face from Ihee for a moment, but 
with everlasting kindness will I have mercy on thee, saith the 
Lord thy Redeemer." Also in Psalms 30. 5 it lVsaid, ''for 
his anger endureth but a moment; in his favor is life: weeping may 
endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning ."■ There we 
see the prospects of the ci>urch gradually brightening, and the prom- 
ise of the Lord verified, wherein again he says, ".for I will 
restore health unto thee, and I will heal thee of thy wounds, 
saith the Lord; because they calleg 1 thee an outcast, saying this is 
Zion whom no man seeketh after. ** Jer 30. 17 And again, "I 
will build thee, and thou shall be built, virgin of Israel: thou 
shall again be adorned with thy tablets and shalt go forth in the 
dances of them that make merry. " Jer. 31. 4. w *For thus saith the 



8 

Lord, behold, I will extend peace to her like a river, and the glory 
of the Geniiles like a flowing stream; then shall ye suck, ye shall be 
borne upon her sides, and be dandled upon her knees." Isaiah, 66. 
12. And now is aboui to be fulfilled indeed in the altered condition of 
the church, the words of the sweet singer in Israel, "thou shalt arise 
and have mercy upon Zio?>: for th<- time to favor her, yea, the set 
time, is come." Psalms, 102. 13. Which induced him further to 
make the following comparison of her: saith he, "there shall be a 
handful of corn in the earth upon the top of the mountains; the 
fruit thereof shall shake like Lebanon, and they of the city shall 
flourish like grass of the earth." Psalms, 72. 16; which per- 
fectly harmonizes with the increase of the church exhibited under 
another figure. Saith the prophet Isaiah, 27. 6: "He shall cause 
them that come of Jacob to take root: Israel shall blossom, and 
bud, and fill the face ot the world with fruit." While riding 
thus prosperously, with the curtains of her habitation stretched 
lorth, her cords lengthened, and her stakes strengthened the church 
with gratitude exclaims unto God, "thou hast turned for me my 
mourning into dancing: thou hast put off my sackcloth, and girded 
me wnh gladness; So the end that my glory may sing praise unto 
thee, and not be silent." Psalms, 30 11, 12. And God replies to 
her on this wise: ' k Fear not, for thou shalt not be ashamed; neither 
be thou confounded, for thou shalt not be put to shame For thou shalt 
forget the shame of thy youth, & shall not remember the reproach of 
thy widowhood any more. For this is as the waters of Noah unto me: 
for as 1 have sworn that the waters of Noah shail no more go over the 
earth; so have I sworn, that I would not be wroth with thee, nor 
rebuke thee. For the mountains shall depart, and the hills be re- 
moved; hut my kindness shall not depart from thee, neither shall 
the covenant of my peace be removed, saith the Lord that hath 
mercy on thee Behold 1 will lay thy stones with fair colors, and lay 
thy foundations with sapphires; and I will make thy windows with 
agates, and thy gates of carbuncles, and all thy borders of pleasant 
stones." Isaiah. 54 chapter. 

Under such great and precious promises as these now that the 
church can realize them, she feels revived; God has indeed visited 
her with the visitations of hi* love; the stately footsteppings of Je- 
hovah are seen in his earthly sanctuary, and the elevated spir- 
its of the bride, the Lamb's wife enables her to sing such songs, as 
the following: "For lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone; 
the flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is 
come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land." Cant. 2. 
11, 12. When the holy city is thus set on such a conspicuous hill, 
of glory, and delight, shedding the divine rays of celestial brightness 
all around, with exceeding admiration, one is heard to exclaim: 
"Beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth is Mount Zion, 
on the sides of the north, the city of the great king. God is known 
in her palaces for a refuse." Psalms, 48. 2, 3. And again: "The 
Lord loveth the gates of Zion more than all the dwellings oi Jacob. 
Glorious things is «poken of thee, city of God." Psalms, 87. 2, 3. 
The church is now lair under way, sailing triumphantly over the 
seas of sorrow, and making rapid progress towards the haven of 
eternal felicity. She is revived, reanimated, clothed with life and 



9 

light, and heavenly grace; her days of mourning, of sackcloth and ash- 
es are forgotten. The pride and vanities of this world are withered 
away, under the scorching rays of God's eternal love. The snares, 
gins, and devices of satan, no longer appear to entangle, entrap, or 
i rapped e her progress heavenward, but are entirely overcome, and she 
is fired with the pure and fervent zeal of spiritual devotion; then it 
is ?hat the members of the church, appear to lose sight of their 
worldly interest, in a great measure, and dedicate their time and 
their talents to the service of the living God. It is not such a cross 
for them now to leave their farms, or their merchandize, and re- 
pair to their places of public worship; but it is done with as much 
alacrity and delight as David manifested when he observed, "I was 
glad when they said unto me, let us go into the house of the Lord." 
Psalms, 122. 1. And when there assembled, instead of that cold- 
ness manifested in their time of leanness, the great subject of re- 
demption appears to absorb their attention, their spirits are on the 
alert, their apprehensions quick, and they are prepared to penetrate 
further, and still further, into the mysteries of God's abounding 
grace, as the minister whose lips now appear, as touched with a 
live roal from off the altar, preaches Christ and him crucified, 
the Holv Ghost overshadows them, and gives their souls a feast of fat 
things; he changes the stubborn will of his people, who have here- 
tofore been growing up in the forests of nature, creates within them 
clean hearts, and right understandings and brings them by scores and 
hundreds, into the fold of Christ as lost sheep ready to perish with 
hunger and thirst. The heavenly flame of God's converting grace, 
appears at times to extend from state to state, from church to church, 
from house to house, from heart to heart, from saint to sinner, un- 
til the whole land, appears to be blessed with the divine presence; 
nearly every heart melted with tender sensibilities of God's eternal 
love, every proud and lofty spirit completely humbled at the foot- 
stool of Christ, their mountain-like prejudices levelled to the dust; 
when the church is thus elevated, enlarged, thus overdoue with joy 
and gladness, sends up a strong hallelujah of praise to God, reali- 
zes the happiness of a foretaste of glory above, and sees, by an eye 
of faith, like Stephen, and Paul of old, "the heavens opened, and 
the Son of man standing on the right hand of God," holding forth 
the crown of righteousness wrought out, or procured by his own 
great meritorious humiliation, which he intends giving them at that 
day, when the secrets of all hearts shall be made known, and the con- 
gregated millions of Adam's posterity are assembled before the judg- 
ment seat of Christ. 

Brethren did any of you ever experience a similar state of things 
to that just described? Perhaps the most of you are ready to say, no; 
but we are persuaded that the souls of some of you, who are yet 
lingering upon the stage of action, some who are upon the watch 
towers of Zion are ready to leap for joy at the recollection of 
those bright scenes, exhibited some thirty odd years ago, in the gos- 
pel church, when the outpourings of God's spirit was displayed in 
such a wonderful manner in 1S02, and 1803, upon the churches 
\n the bounds of this Association, and elsewhere, when the ministers 



10 

and members were in tears upon the bosom of each other at the 
amazing goodness of God; when eye met eye, heart met heart, soul 
met soul, in divine thanks, and rapturous streams of holy love over- 
whelmed ttie congregations of the just, and kept them in the unity 
of the spirit, and bond of peace. — Aged brethren, would you not 
like to witness such a joyful time once more, before you die, and go 
hence to the place appointed for all living? No doubt you would, 
but the prospect is gloomy. And ye, young soldiers of the cross, 
tis doubtful whether you will ever witness such a time of gene- 
ral joy, for the day is so dark and cloudy we may not expect the 
sun soon to shine. But sooner or later, the time will again roll 
round, when as heretofore, God will visit his church with the visit- 
ations of his love; with a revival of pure and undefiled religion, wa- 
ter her with refreshing showers from heaven, cause her to flourish 
15ke the willows by the water courses, and ultimately bring forth 
much fruit, to the honor and glory of his great name. May the will 
of the Lord be done. 

We are sometimes in the habit of viewing residences of men on 
earth, the situation and style of which strike our minds with admiration; 
and men frequently indulge in delightful reverie upon the beauty 
and magnificence of such dwellings, gardens, and delectable land- 
scapes, as they would like to enjoy the possession of in this life. 
But brethren how rapidly all these considerations fall into insignifi- 
cance, when we for a moment contemplate the sublime excellen- 
cies of our "building of God, a house not made with hands, eter- 
nal in the heavens." 2 Cor. (and how encouraging the recollection 
that this glorious building with the magnificence, and grandeur there- 
of, is the sure and lawful inheritance of the poorest saint now on 
earth.) Moreover, "Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have 
entered into the heart of man, the things which God hath prepa- 
red for them that love him." 1 Cor. 2.9. In short the members 
of the church triumphant "neither marry, nor are given in marriage, 
but are as the angels of God in heaven;'* Matt. 23. 30: where in 
the fresh bloom of undying youth they shall forever flourish; and 
carrying in their souls the rapturous fires of the celestial throne, in 
ceaseless streams from their angelic tongues the thrilling notes of 
loud hosannahs will flow; yea, there they are completely, and spi- 
ritually perfect; yea, happified, purified, and eternally glorified. 
"They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more; neither 
shall the sun light on them, nor any heat: for the Lamb which is in 
the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead thern unto living 
fountains of water: and God shall wipe away all tears froo) their 
eves." Rev. 7. 16, 17. The prophet Isaiah, 60. 19, 20, would 
make the following address to the church while in this glorified 
slate: "the sun shall be no more thy light by day; neither for bright- 
ness shall the moon give light unto thee: but the Lord shall be 
unto thee an everlasting light, and thy God thy glory. Thy sun shall 
no more go down; neither shall thy moon withdraw itself: for the 
Lord shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy mourn- 
ing shall be ended." 



11 

And to conclude the description of this state of ineffable glory 
and delight, the saints are represented by Saint John the divine, 
when selected from all nations, &c. as "standing before the throne, 
and before the Lamb, clothed with while robes, and palms in their 
hands, and crying with a loud voice, salvation to our God which 
sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb: and the angels joining in 
the song of celestial praise, likewise singing, Blessing, and glory, 
wisdom, and thanksgiving, and honor and power, and might, be un- 
to our God, forever and ever." Amen. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Moderator. 
JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk. 



Tarboro\JV.C) Press. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



Kehuhee Baptist Association , 

HELD AT 

LAWRENCE'S MEETING HOUSE, 

EDGECOMBE COUNTY, N. C. 

Commencing Saturday before the first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1837. 



SATURDAY, September 30th, 1837. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was delivered agreeably 
to appointment by Elder Joseph Biggs, from St. Matthew, 
xxiv. Chap, and 14 verse : "And this gospel of the king- 
dom shall be preached in all the world, for a witness unto 
all nations, and then shall the end come." Prayer by 
Elder Mark Bennett. 

2. The delegates from the several churches then as- 
sembled, and the Association was opened with prayer by 
Eldor William Hyman;when Elder William Hyman was 
chosen moderator, Elder Joseph Biggs clerk, and brethren 
Joseph D. Biggs and R. M. G. Moore, assistant clerks. 

3. Brethren in the ministry (present) from sister Asso- 
ciations were invited to seats; when Elders Mark Ben- 
nett, James Griffin, Parham Packet, Thomas Gibsou, 
James Wilder, Jesse Addoms, Josiah Smith and Wil- 
loughby Hudgins, seated themselves. 

4. Letters from 31 churches were read, and the names 
of the delegates enrolled, and the representation stated in 
the table of churches. 



% 



Karnes of Churches and 
Counties where situated. 



MINISTERS & DELEGATES 



1. Baregrass, Martin, — .James Harrison, Abram P^el, 
'2. Biount's Cr'h Beaufort,- Lodowick Redditt, J. R. Phiipott, 
3. Co <>enjock, Currituck,! |SAMUEL TATUM,* 
4 Conoho, Martin. — Nath'l F. Hooker, John Bryan, 

5. Goneto, Edgecombe, — Richard E. Rieves* JOHN H- 

I DAN" L, 

6. Concord, Washington, MICAJAH AMBROSE/ 

7 Cross Hoads. Edgecombe, WM. HYMAN, Jos'h J. Pippen, 

8. Cedar Island, Carteret, — ,Thomas Robinson, John Roberts, 

9. Deep Creek, Halifax,- — 'William Whitehead, 

10. Falls Tar River, Mash,— Robert Sorer, Jam<>s S, Battle, 

11. Flat Swamp, Pitt,— \Wm. W. K Phiipott, irvin Page, 
VI. FlaifyCr'k, Pasquotank-DB Pendietov, * Fran'? Fletcher, 
13 Frying Pan, Tyrrell,— David Cahoot* 

14. Goose Creek, Beaufort, — James Potter, Zach'h Linton * 

15. Great Swamp, Pitt, — ,H>rdy Wbitchard.WiiiisFleming, 
16 Hunting Quarters, Car' 't,tj 

17. Kehukee, Halifax, — General Young, Reuben Higgs, 

18. Lawrence's M. H. "i^ge-JOSHUA LAWRENCE, Rich'd 

combe, Harrison, - «. 

19. Little AI,Hgator,Tyrre\\,f - - 

SO. Morattock, Washington,- Wilson W. Mizell, Wm.Gray,* 
21. JVorth Crtek. 8eanf<ft,- i lioraas Bsrrow, Henry Blount, 

22 No.Mattamuskeet,Uy(le.\\ - 

23 Old Ford, Beaufort, — D^vid Singleton, John Hftdges,* 

24 PicolM.H Martin,— ; J«s'a Robertson, J.G.Smithwick* 
25. PowtWs Point, Curr'k,t! - - - 

26 Pungo, Beaufort, — Henry L. Davis, John Clark, 
27, Rocky Swamp, HalifaXj-jLerruel B- Bennett, 



Sappony, Nash, 

29. Scunperriong, Tyrrell, t 

30. So.'Matlamuskeel, Hyde, 

31 .So. Qimy.So'ampton Va.- 

32. Skewarkey, Martin, 

33. Smithwick'i Cr'fc/Martin, 

34. Sound Side, Tyrrell, — 
33. Spring Green, Martin,- — 

36 Tarboro\ Edgecombe, — 
37» Washington, Beaufort, — 
38. White Plains, Beaufort, 



39. V/illiams , M. 
combe,- — 



H. Edge 



Absalom B. Bains, Jr. C. Baker, 

GEO. W. CARROWAEV A. B,' 

Swindell, R. M. G. Moore, 
Elisha Darrien, E. HARRISON, 
JOS'H BiGGS.JOHN WARD,* 
Joseph D. Biirgs, 

mjcajah Perry/ Humph- 
rey STAL LINGS, 

Caleb Woodard r 

Stephen Outterbridge, Levelling 
Bowers, 

Cdffieid King, Ely Porter,* 

Jacob Swindell, George Elliott, 

MILES EVERITT,* A met Wa- 
ters, Jonathan Wallace, 

David Bradley, Edward Power,* 



2 7 



1 1 1 



i i 



l l 



s l 



i 3 



6 517 1346 31546 



41 



#Cts 



1 50 



75 



1 50 



2 00 



1 50 



Total. 
NOTE, Pastors of churches and other ordained ministers are in CAPITALS; unor- 
dained ministers fti italics; those marked thus * were not present; from churches marked 
thus t we received no intelligence, in that case their number stands as last represented; 
dashes — denote no pastors; the last column shows the contributions from the churches to 
the Association fund. 



5. Petitionary letters for membership in this Association 
were called for, when one from the church at Sappony, 
Nash county, one from Rocky Swamp, Halifax county, 
and one from South Quay, Southampton county, Virginia, 
were handed forward, read, and upon satisfactory Infor- 
mation of their failh and standing, they were received as 






3 

members of this Association, and manifested by the mode- 
rator giving their delegates the right hand of fellowship; 
and they seated themselves accordingly. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister associations 
were called for: when one from the Contentnea Associa- 
tion was handed in by their delegate, Elder Mark Bennett, 
and read; Elders Josiah Smith and Parham Pucket handed 
in sundry copies of the minutes of the White Oak Asso- 
ciation, stating their appointment as delegates, (their let- 
ter failing to come to hand,) the same was cheerfully re- 
ceived, and they recognized as delegates. Elder Jesse 
Addoms, from the Little River Association, handed in 35 
copies of their Jast year's minutes. Elders Wilder and 
Gibson, from the Country Line Association, handed in 20 
copies of their minutes, and they requested a correspon- 
dence with this body, which were thankfully received and 
distributed among the churches. 

7. The following committees were appointed, viz : 
James S. Battle and Coffield King, on finance :— 
Elder W'illiam Hyman, to prepare a letter of corres- 
pondence to the Contentnea Association. Brother Joseph 
D. Biggs to write a letter to the White Oak Association. 
All to report on Monday next. 

8. Brother John H. Daniel, who was appointed to write 
a Circular Letter for this Association, failing to do so, it 
was resolved, that Elder Joshua Lawrence be requested 
to prepare one; and when examined and approved by Elder 
William Hyman and brother James S. Battle, to be at- 
tached to these minutes. 

9. Elders, Willoughby Hudgins, Parham Pucket, and 
Joshua Lawrence, was requested (by private ballot) to oc- 
cupy the stage by preaching on the morrow, divine wor- 
ship to commence at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer until Mon- 
day next, 9 o'clock, A. M. 

SUNDAY, October 1st, 1837. 

Elder Parham Pucket introduced the services of the 
day, and preached from St. Luke, xix. chap, and 10th 
verse : "For the Son of man is come to seek and to save 
that which is lost." Elder Willoughby Hudgings followed 
and preached from Hebrews, x. chap, and 39th verse : 
"But we are not of them who draw back unto perdition, 
but of them that believe to the saving of the soul," Elder 
Joshua Lawrence closed, and preached from St. Luke, 
xvi. chap, and 31st verse : "And he said unto him, if they 



4 
bear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be per- 
suaded, though one rose from the dead." 

From the faithful administration of the word, and the 
attention of the congregation, we hope the labours of the 
day has, and will be, blest of the Lord. 

MONDAY, October 2d, 1837. 
The Association assembled, and was opened with 
prayer by Elder Mark Bennett, and proceeded to busi- 
ness. 

10. The committees appointed on Saturday were called 
on to report, when Elder William Hyman, who was ap- 
pointed to write a letter to the Contentnea Association, 
handed in one which was read and approved, and Elders 
Joshua Lawrence and Humphrey Stallings, appointed our 
messengers to that Association. 

Brother Joseph D. Biggs, who was appointed to write 
a letter to the White Oak Association, handed in one 
which was read and approved. 

The committee of finance reported 

That they find in the bands of the Treasurer at the close of 

last Association the sum of - - $99 69! 

Received in contributions from the churches at this Associ'n, 38 60 

Making $138 29^ 
Paid for transcribing the Minutes of last year, re- 
cording one copy on our record, superintending 
the printing, and distributing as usual to the 
churches and sister Associations, - Si 5 00 

Paid Printer for 1000 copies, - - 30 00 

— 45 00 

Balance now in the hands of the Treasurer, $93 29^ 
The Association concurred with the Report. 

11. Resolved, That Elder Joshua Lawrence write a 
letter of correspondence to the Little River Association, 
over the signature of the moderator and clerk, and that 
brethren James S. Battle and Robert Sorey, be the bear- 
ers thereof, with 25 copies of our minutes. 

12. Resolved, That Elder Joshua Lawrence write a let- 
ter of correspondence to the Country Line Association, 
over the signature of the moderator and clerk, and that 
Elders William Hyman and John H. Daniel, and brother 
Richard Harrison, be our messengers and bearers thereof. 

13. Resolved, That our next Association be held at 
Spring Green Meeting House, Martin county, to com- 
mence on Saturday, before the first Sunday in October, 
1858, commencing at 11 o'clock, A. M., and that Elder 



Joshua Lawrence be requested to deliver an Introductory 
Sermon to that body, and in case of his failure, Elder Wil- 
liam Hyman. 

14. On motion, the roll of the delegates names were 
called over, and absentees noted. 

15. Elder Joshua Lawrence is requested to prepare a 
Circular Letter for our next Association. 

16. Resolved, That Elder Joseph Biggs be requested 
to transcribe and prepare the minutes for the press, and 
have 1000 copies printed, and distribute them as usual to 
the churche.3 and sister Associations with which we cor- 
respond, and record one copy on our records. 

The Association then adjourned to the time and place 
appointed, with an exhortation by the moderator and 
prayer by Elder Joshua Lawrence. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Moderator. 

JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk, 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 

The ministers and delegates composing the Kehukee Association 
for 1837, to [he several churches they represent, send greeting: and 
this epistle, to all the brethren and sisters composing the several 
churches of that Association. Wishing grace, mercy and peace, with 
love and union, to abound among you, in the strongest bonds of 
Christian fellowship, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ 
his Son, by the influence of his holy and blessed Spirit on your every 
heart, working in you to will and to do of God's good pleasure while 
here on earth; that you may thereby be prepared for the enjoyment 
of his eternal glory in heaven, when this suffering life shall cease and 
you all enter on eternity's everlasting shore. 

Dearly beloved brethren in the* Lord: You will certainly 
expect a Circular attached to our Minutes, when you receive them; 
forasmuch as many of you know that there was an appointment to 
write one for this Association; but not coming to hand, we are under 
the necessity of drafting one in a short time, in order to meet your 
expectations. And we know of nothing at present that more con- 
cerns the churches than that of some remarks on A VALID BAP- 
TISM. For the devil in a thousand forms has through the instru- 
mentality of man attacked the word, doctrine, and ordinances of 
Christ; which it becomes the duty of the churches composing the 
Kehukee Association to defend, if they think they are churches of 
Christ. For Christ has committed all his gospel goods to his church 
and ministers, and we ask you who shall take care of them if his 
church and ministers do not? Will the world take care of the word, 
doctrine, and ordinances of Christ? Surely not. Will the devil, or 
anti-chrisi? Surely not. Will Mahometans? Surely not. Then 
Ute responsibility of the churches composing the Kehukee Associa- 



6 

tkm is very great, if they be Christians, to transmit to the next gene^ 
ration of Christians and ministers with truth, faithfulness and clear- 
ness, the holy word, doctrine, and ordinances of Christ; without the 
alloy of hypocrisy, tradition, or human inventions of any kind added 
thereunto; as they have received them from their forefathers, and 
proved by the word of God, otherwise void and of none effect. 

For you know, dear brethren, that the devil through false teachers 
has attacked even the person of Christ; calling and endeavoring by 
many sophistical arguments to prove him a mere man, and not God, 
nor Son of God. And equally so they have attacked the doctrine of 
his gospel, and shaped it in ten thousand forms, adding and dimin- 
ishing its various truths to suit their lust of getting money thereby; 
and to shape the gospel doctrine that it ought either suit the taste of 
hypocrites, false professors, or the men of this world. And also you 
know that devilish false teachers have attacked the Lord's Supper; 
an ordinance laid down so plain in the New Testameut, both by pre- 
cept and example, that he that runs may read the manner of it and 
the end for which it was instituted by Christ, the head and lawgiver 
of his church. Yet the priests have twisted and turned this to suit 
their coveting, money-getting dispositions; as well as the Corinthians 
did to drunkenness and full bellies at their church meetings, and not 
at home. 

Equally so, dear brethren, you know that the ordinance of bap- 
tism has been attacked by false teachers; and warped in various forms 
from its original to sprinkling,, pouring, &c; which was not the ori- 
ginal manner nor New Testament form, as practised by John, or 
Christ, or the apostles, as laid down in the New Testament; to which 
we now invite your attention in this our epistle. Not that we intend 
to go fully into an investigation of this subject, but to make a (ew re- 
marks on two parts of it, and on the third to dwell somewhat; for 
you know our limits will not admit it in the short contents of a Cir- 
cnlar letter. 

And first, all we have to say on this subject is couched in a few 
words: What is a valid scriptural baptism? To which we answer, 
baptism may be divided into three parts; first, the mode or manner of 
doing the act of baptism; second, the subject on whom the act of 
baptism is performed; and third, the administrator that performs the 
act and his authority to do so. To the two first heads we design t© 
speak but short, as so much has already been written, to which we re- 
fer you; but on the third part or head we design to dwell at some 
length, as but little has been said or written on this part of baptism, 
to make a valid baptism according to the New Testament. 

And first, as to the mode we will say a few things. We challenge 
the world to show from any history, book, or record, any administra- 
tor, or mode or practice of baptism before the days of John the Bap- 
tist, as recorded in the New Testament. Then this administrator and 
his mode and subjects are the origin of baptism. Although some 
have gone back to Abraham's covenant of circumcision, and to the 
Jewish tabernacle and temple, for sprinkling, this is all fudge; say- 
ing, that baptism was in lieu of circumcision. If this be true, then 
>e brethren, are right; for Abraham was a believer before he was 



7 

circumcised, and circumcision only a sign of the faith he then had* 
For Paul makes circumcision only an outward sigr, so is baptism an 
outward sign of the inward work of grace and faith on believers, as 
Abraham's circumcision was of hh inward grace and faith. And 
Paul settles all this in thesg w< r«Js, saving: He is not a Jew which is 
one outwardly, neither is that circumcision which is ouiward in the 
(lesh. But he is a Jew wind* is one inwardly, and circumcision is 
that of the heart in ti:e spirit and not in the letter; whose praise is not 
of men but of God. Romans, 2. 28, 29. And now to gospelize these 
verses it would read thus: He is not a Baptist who has outward wa- 
ter baptism, neither because he is baptized by water; but he is a Bap- 
tist who has been inwardly renewed by the Spirit in the heart, and 
then baptized after his renewal and faith as was Abraham circumcised. 
But it is sufficiently clear from the New Testament, thai ail Jewish 
types, shadows and ceremonies, were put to an end by ihe dispensa- 
tion of ihe gospel; and circumcision with the rest, as Paul's epis«les 
to the Gallatians and Hebrews fully shows, for which proofread.. 

Then as John's baptism was the origin of baptism, as to mode, sub- 
ject, and administrator; to the account of it as recorded in the New 
Testament as to mode we shall go, for our proof of this fact.. John, 
3. 23: And John also was baptising in iEuon, (not at, or near about, 
but <u,) near to Salim, (and why?) because there was much water 
there; and they (the people) came and were baptized. Now this 
verse shows plainly that the first administrator and mode of baptism 
required much water in order to perform the act of baptism, by the 
administrator John, who was the first that ever performed this rite of 
the church; and that tub fulls, pail, pitcher, or gourd fulls, could not 
have been here denominated much water, because the place is men- 
tioned, iEnon, and much water there, is the reason given why John 
baptized in this place. Then baptism performed without much wa- 
ter in the place where the act of baptism is performed, is not valid 
nor a scriptural baptism, even enough to immerse the whole body is 
required in the place where the act of baptism is performed. We cite 
you Corinthians, 10. 2. Romans, 6. 4, as proof. 

Next we cite John, 1. 9, 10: And it came to pass in those days, 
that Jesus came from Nazareth of GalliSee and was baptized of John 
in Jordan. (Mark that word, in Jordan; also, in iEnon— see how 
these verses agree both as to mode, in, and noj at or about.) 10th 
verse: And Jesus straitway coming up out of the water. Mark this 
verse also proves he had been in the water, while the mode was per- 
formed or act of baptism. Then here are two ins, to prove the mode 
or act of baptism was performed in much water; for Jordan was a riv- 
er, and of course there was much water there. 

Again: we cite you Acts, 8. 38, 39: And he commanded the cha- 
riot to stand still, and they went down both into the water both Phi- 
lip and the Eunuch, and he baptized him. Then this verse shows a- 
gain the mode of baptism was in the water, -mod that j :^e subject and 
administrator must both be i« the water, in order to perform the mode 
of a New Testament water baptism; and we challenge the world to 
show by the New Testament that baptism was ever performs! out of 
the water. We have produced three ins, the water, for the mode oi 



8 
baptism; now, if you can, produce three outs, of the water, from scrip- 
ture, or even one. Now we know, dear brethren, that no man can 
produce one baptism in the New Testament, where the mode and act 
of baptism was performed out of the v.ater, not founded on supposi- 
tion; much less by express scripture, out of the water. Then we say 
to you, dear brethren, that any thing called baptism, the mode not 
being performed in the water, is not a valid and scriptural baptism* 

Next we come to make a few remarks on the valid and scriptural 
subjects of baptism. What sort of persons did this John, the first 
performer of baptism baptize, as the subjects of baptism for God who 
sent him to baptize? Certainly let him know the proper valid subjects 
of baptism, as well as the mode; or how else would he have went a- 
bout performing baptism, a thing he never saw practised nor had 
been done since the world began. And had he have asked all the 
wise of the world put together, they could not have told him either 
the mode or subjects of baptism. Then God made known to John both 
the mode and subjects of baptism. In the same way he made known 
to him the Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world, and to 
reject the pharisees and not baptize them. So then the subjects of 
baptism are a peculiar kind of people, forasmuch as John refused 
baptism to the pharisees it shows all men are not the proper subjects 
of baptism, but a particular kind of persons only. And in order to 
prove which, to the book. Mark, I. 5: And there went out unto 
him all the land of Judea and they of Jerusalem, and were all bapti- 
zed of him in (mark that word in, again, that makes four ins) the 
river of Jordan, confessing their sins. Thus you can see by this text 
the persons John baptized, such as confessed their sins; these were 
his subjects of baptism, and of course John then did not admit chil- 
dren to baptism. Nor were they subjects of his baptism, because 
they could not confess sins; for those he baptized confessed their 
sins. Then we say, brethren, children are not valid scriptural sub- 
jects of baptism. 

Acts, 19. 4: Then said Paul, John verily baptized with the bap- 
tism, of repentance, saying unto the people that they should believe 
on him which should come after him; that is, on Christ Jesus. So 
then, from the above text, according to Paul's exposition of John's 
baptism, John required faith in Christ Jesus which was to come in a 
subject before he would baptize him; which clearly proves three cha- 
racteristics in the subjects of John's baptism, to make them subjects 
of valid baptism—repentance, confession of sins, and faith in him 
that was to come; that is, Christ Jesus. These were the prerequisites 
required by John to make a valid subject of baptism, which neither chil- 
dren, nor the pharisees, nor scribes, nor men in a state of nature possess; 
therefore neither of these are valid and scriptural subjects of baptism. 

And further, the whole tenor of the gospels and all the epistles 
show, that repentance and faith were required by Christ and his apos- 
tles to (it any person for baptism; such as, repent and believe the gos- 
pel — except ye repent ye shall all likewise perish — repent, for the 
kingdom of heaven is at hand — he that believeth and is baptized 
shall be saved — go teach all nation*, baptizing them, he. — and ma- 
ny of the Corinthians believed and were baptized, &c. &jq. Uc. — with 



9 

a hundred other proofs that it is the man that repents of his past sins* 
amends his life, and confesses his sins with a broken and contrite 
heart, and believeth in Jesus Christ with all his heart as did the Eu- 
nuch, that are only the valid and scriptural subjects of baptism; any 
thing and every thing said to the contrary notwithstanding. In this 
truth of the mode and subjects of the ordinance of baptism for validi- 
ty, dear brethren, stand fast; and let no man spoil your faith through 
vain philosophy, tradition or deceit, that any other person is a scrip- 
tural subject of baptism but the man or woman that repenteth, con- 
fesses their sins, amend their lives, and with the heart believeth in our 
Lord Jesus Christ, and confesses the same with their mouth as did the 
Eunuch to Philip, saying, I believe Jesus Christ to be the Son of 
God. We have only made these remarks on the mode and subject 
of baptism, merely to refresh your memories and put you in mind of 
what we have heretofore written you on the subject of baptism. 

We now, dear brethren, come to our third head, and that is, to 
show who the man is that is a valid and scriptural administrator of 
baptism, according to scripture; for we conceive there is as much in 
the administrator to make a valid baptism, as there is in the mode or 
subject, For the mode of baptism and the subject of baptism can't 
make a scriptural baptism, without an administrator to perform the 
mode; for the subject can't perform the mode on himself. For it 
takes both Christ and Johu the Baptist — it takes Philip and the Eu- 
nuch*— it takes Ananias and Paul — to make a valid baptism with the 
mode beside. Then here in the three above cases you can plainly see 
the three things proposed, essential to make a valid baptism; nor is 
the administrator the least of the three in making baptism valid. For 
without the administrator, and he vested with proper authority to per- 
form the rite of baptism, there can be no such a thing as valid or scrip- 
tural baptism. 

Then we presume no man will deny but John was the first admin- 
istrator of a valid and scriptural baptism. From whence was his au- 
thority, from heaven or Oi men? John, 1. 33: And 1 knew him not, 
but he that sent me to baptize with water, the same said unto me upon 
r whom thou shah see the Spirit descending and remaining on him, 
the same is he which baptizeth with the Holy Ghost. 34th verse? 
And I saw and bare record that this is the Son of God. Now the a- 
bove verses show that John was sent to baptize — who sent him? why 
God the Father sent him to bear witness to the light. He sent him 
that Christ Jesns might be made manifest to Israel. He sent him to 
baptize with water — all which the chapter proves. So then John, 
the first administrator of baptism, had his authority from heaven; and 
it was this heaven-commissioned authority that made him a valid ad- 
ministrator, otherwise his baptism would have been invalid. Of this 
we^ffer as proof — suppose Jesus Christ had baptized a person with 
wafer, would such a person's baptism been valid or not? We pause 
for you to think. We answer, no; because Jesus Christ had no com- 
mission from heaven to baptize with water. God had given him no 
such commission, therefore if he had baptized with water without the 
commissioned authority, such a baptism would have been invalid; 
forasmuch as it was John's authority from heaven that made his bap- 



40 

tism valid, having a right mode and right subject. Then all bapr 
tisms are invalid by any man that is not divinely commissioned from 
heaven; thus it takes God's prescribed mode, God's prescribed sub- 
ject and God's authorised minister to make a valid and scriptural bap- 
tism. And this further appears from the following reasons: John was 
sent of God to baptize with water, and not with the Holy Ghost; John 
could not, nor did not, baptize with the Holy Ghost; nor did he even 
confer nor could he confer the Holy Ghost, or could he work miracles, 
nor ever did he work a miracle. Then John was just such a Baptist 
preacher as those in these days, without the gift of the Holy Ghost; 
which gift alone qualified men to work miracles. Bui Jesus Christ 
was sent of God not to baptize with water, as was John, -but to baptize 
with the Holy Ghost; and had he baptized with water, he had no au- 
thority to do so. Then his baptism would have been, invalid, "for he 
had no commission to baptize with water; therefore the scriptures 
show us Jesus baptized not, but that his disciples baptized. 

Then from scripture it is clear that John had authority to baptize 
with water, but not with the Holy Ghost; so from the scriptures it 
is equally clear, that Jesus had a commission to baptize with the Holy 
Ghost, and not with water; so then each followed his commission, as 
the whole tenor of the gospel shows, and neither intruded into the 
commission of the other. Had they have done so, each baptism 
would have been invalid. And this further appears from God's call 
to the priest ofiice. None were ealled to this office but the tribe of 
Levi; none commissioned but them; therefore, those who assumed 
the office and offered incense were burnt with fire from heaven; as no 
priestly office was valid but he that was called and commissioned by 
God to that office. Therefore, says Paul, no man takelh this office 
to himself, but he that was called of God as was Aaron. Because 
nothing he done was by divine command, or of divine authority; 
therefore invalid and offensive to God. And Paul applies this to the 
ministry. And God might say, who hath required this at your 
hands; for I have not sent you to do so, and by what authority do 
you these things ? So then it takes the divine call and commission 
to make a priest and his offering valid; so also it takes the divine call 
and commission of God to make a minister and his office, and act of 
baptism valid, and nothing short of this can do it. Then if Christ 
had baptized, and did not baptize because he had no commission to 
do so, how dare others who have no commission from God to do so ? 
Such are intruders into office, and shall be dealt with by God as such, 
saying, you run and I sent you not, 6ic. 

Having thus shown that it takes an administrator divinely com- 
missioned to make baptism valid, we pursue our third head further. 
Jesus Christ, the head of all principality and power, the head of his 
church, God's king in Zion and lawgiver of his church, and further, 
the Father vesting him with all power in heaven and earth, after his 
deatli assumed the right and authority of calling, qualifying and com- 
missioning men to preach and baptize nations according to the m%de 
he himself was baptized with. For he himself says, baptism was the 
council of God, and that it was a commandment of God; as it was 
righteousness in John to administer it, as being sent; and him to obey 
It, as a command of God, and thus they would fulfil all righteousness 
as respected the command of God concerning baptism. Nor can we 
believe that Christ would pervert the command of his Father con- 



f, It 

cerning baptism, eilher as to mode, subject, or administrator; but en- 
forced the same by commission and his authority on his disciples. 
And thus he says : Go ye into all the world; he that believeth and 
is baptized shall be saved. And thus : Go teach all nations, bap- 
tizing them, &c. So then he does not tell them the mode, and why ? 
because they well understood this. But he tells them the subject : 
He that believeth. Then it follows that all the apostles were com- 
missioned and delegated with power and commission to baptize be- 
lievers from Jesus Christ, who is the rightful head, sovereign and 
lawgiver of his church. And thus all they baptized, il believers, by 
the original mode their baptism was a valid baptism; because they 
had Christ's commission so to do, and not otherwise. 

But we still pursue our third head, as to a legil administrator 
making a valid baptism. Now let it here be understood that John 
was authorised by God the Father to baptize with water; and that 
Christ was only authorised to baptize with the Holy Gbosf, and not 
with water. And here let it also be fully understood, that the apostles, 
and not the seventy sent out, were fully commissioned to baptize 
both with the Holy Ghost and water by Christ, the head of his 
church; and that the seventy had not the power nor commission to 
give the Holy Ghost nor work miracles; butfibat this of giving the 
Holy Ghost was exclusively given to the apostles fur reasons we 
could easily assign, by the laying on of their hands; but. neither John 
nor the seventy could do so. Then they were just the sa,me as min- 
isters of this day, only that of planning to get money %^ the new 
schemes of the day; of this there is not a word said. Then it follows 
that the apostles had the commission to baptize with water, and the 
power to give the Holy Ghost by laying on of hands, and by this 
gift of the Holy Ghost to work miracles; which no other set of min- 
isters have had since that time. Yet although ministers since the 
days of the apostles have not had the power to give the Hf ly Ghost 
by laying on of hands, nor been baptized with the. Holy Gljipst as they 
were, nor had the power to work miracles as the apostles had; yet 
every minister since the apostles' lime, that has been called and com- 
missioned of God to preach and baptize, although they were not bap- 
tized with the Holy Ghost, nor could work miracles, yet being com- 
missioned of God so to do, their baptisms have been as valid as that 
of John or the seventy, provided the mode and subject were scrip- 
tural, or even that of the apostles. For the baptism of the Holy 
Ghost was never given to make a Christian, but for other purposes. 
Yet still we pursue the third head, as to the lawful administrator 
to make a valid baptizm. John being commissioned of God was a 
lawful administrator, the twelve apostles being commissioned by 
Christ, or the seventy, were lawful administrators; and this because 
sovereign authority commissioned them to baptize, otherwise it 
would have been invalid; because it is only the right of sovereignty 
to command and require obedience. Then we proceed to other ad- 
ministrators who baptized, not iq the limits of the Jewish nation, as 
did John and the apostles in the first progress of their commission; to 
wit, Paul and his colleagues. That Paul was baptized by Ananias 
none will doubt, and that he baptized his epistle to the church at 
Corinth fully shews; 1st chapter,' 1 6th verse : And I baptized also 
the household of Sfephanus, &e- 17. For Christ sent me not to bap 
tize, but to preach the gospel, &e. Now here we ask a question : 



12 

Was Paul's commission to baptize from Christ? The above verse 
say? not; for he says, Christ sent him not to baptize, but hv preach 
the gospel. How then dare he to baptize? Why, God the Father 
sent John to baptize, and Christ sent the twelve and the seventy; but 
now the Holy Ghost sends Paul. As proof, Acts, 13, 2 : As they 
ministered to the LoFd and fasted, the Holy Ghost said, separate me 
Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I (I (he Holy Ghost) have 
called them. 3. And when they had fasted and prayed, and laid 
their hands on them, they (the church) sent them away. 4. So ihey 
being sent forth by the Holy Ghost, departed unto Seieucia, and 
from thence they sailed to Cyprus. 

Now, clear brethren, don't forget that God the Father sends the 
first Baptist preacher, John the Baptist; also don't forget that Jesus 
Christ, the second person in the trinity, sends forth the twelve and 
seventy Baptist preachers to the world, and commissioned them to 
preach and baptize the nations. And we charge you by all that is 
divine, not to forget that the Holy Ghost sends forth the third 
sort, Barnabas and Saul. And why ? because it has been the office 
of the Holy Ghost to send preachers and qualify preachers for the 
world from that day to this. For Jesus said, when he went away 
he would send him (the Holy Ghost.) So then we have to look to 
the Holy Ghost for Baptist preachers of the right sort, and not to the 
schools for men and devil preachers. Then the Holy Ghost sent 
Paul and Barnabas to the heathen, and not mission and begging so- 
cieties; for among the heathen was this work that the Holy Ghost had 
called them to. Then God the Father sent John the Baptist, and 
Christ Jesus the twelve and seventy, and Paul he called to the apos- 
tleship to bear witness of him in Jerusalem, Rome, and elsewhere; 
yet it is the Holy Ghost that requires the church at Antioch to sepa- 
rate Paul to the work for which Christ and the Holy Ghost had called 
him. So then since that time, it is the n£ht and office of the Holy 
Ghost to call a minister to his work, and by his call or impression on 
the church to separate him by office from the rest of the church to 
the office of a minister or baprizer. For Paul by this separation be- 
came a baptizer of the heathen, and by no other means was his bap- 
tizing of a person valid, but because the Holy Ghost had called him 
to the work, and the church had separated him by fasting, prayer, 
and laying on hands to the work. And thus any person that Paul 
or Barnabas baptized among the heathen, by a lawful mode, and 
they being a lawful subject, such a baptism was valid; and only so 
because of the call of the Holy Ghost, and the separation of the 
church to that office by fasting, prayer, and laying on of hands; oth- 
erwise void and of none effect. 

Then we see a divine commission necessary in John, in the apos- 
tles, and seventy; and also in Paul and Barnabas, to make them valid 
administrators. And this instance in thechurch at Antioch, by the 
call of the Holy Ghost on the church for Paul and Barnabas to be se- 
parated to the work of the ministry, by fasting, prayer, and laying on 
of hands, is the first instance in the scriptures where the church of 
Christ shows her delegated power by the Holy Ghost, in the ordina- 
tiation of ministers. Then laying on of hands by an apostle, was to 
give the Holy Ghost and office; but the laying on of hands of other 
ministers, was to seoarate to office. For Paul was called to be an 



13 

apostle of Jesus Christ before he received the imposition of hands in 
the church at Antioch; for as soon as converted and baptized : He 
straitwsy preached Jesus Christ was the son of God. And he had 
preached sometime in Judea. but he now is to be sent to the heathen to 
administer baptism and the Lord's Supper, and build up and establish 
churches; and to do which lawfully by God and church authority, 
he must be separated to that office by the church, fasting, prayer, 
and laying on of hands of the other three teachers in this church, in 
order to make him a valid and proper administrator for the above 
work. So then a divine call to the ministry, and the sanction and 
separation of the church to that office by the imposition of hands of 
a presbytery, are the only things that can make a lawful administra- 
tor or a valid baptism; the person thus ordained himself first being 
baptized by immersion by a man thus ordained to office. By read- 
ing ihe chapter? it is certain that Paul had the gift of preaching and 
the Holy Ghost before hands were laid on him. So then the laying 
on of hands on Paul and Barnabas was to separate to the office of 
ministers, and thus make their baptism a valid baptism, otherwise of 
none effect. 

This same practice seems to be alluded to in 1st Timothy, 4. 14 : 
Neglect not the gift that is in thee, which was given thee by pro- 
phecy, with the laying on of the hands of the presbytery. Thus no 
man can perform a valid baptism without a divine commission, and 
passing to that office by the delegated authority of the church and 
laying on of the hands of 'wo or three ministers as a presbytery; of 
this there can be no doubt from scripture — besides the many proofs 
that could be brought from the Old Testament of the laying on of 
hands to separate to office, as appointed of God in the Old Testa- 
ment, to which we refer you. 

Some have supposed that the laying on of hands were in all cases 
to give the Holy Ghost; and thus because they could not give the 
Holy Ghost by laying on of their hands, have refused to help ordain 
deacons and ministers to these offices. But to convince such, we 
refer you to Acts, 6. 3 : Wherefore, brethren, look ye out among 
you seven men of honest report, full of the Holy Ghost and wisdom, 
whom we may (we, the apostles,) appoint over this business. 5th 
verse : And they chose Stephen, a man full of the Holy Ghost, &c. 
6th verse : Whom they (the church) set before the apostles; and 
when they had prayed, they laid their hands on them. So from the 
above verses, it is clear that the apostles used the laying on of hands 
to separate to office, even those men that were already full of the 
Holy Ghost. So then laying on of hands in these cases could not 
be to give the Holy Ghost, for that they already had before hands 
were laid on them. Then it is clear as the sun at noon day, that the 
apostles laid their hands on tHe seven men chosen to be deacons by 
the church; not to give the Holy Ghost, but to separate and set apart 
to office. And it was so by Paul and Barnabas to set them apart to 
the office of ministers, and not to give the Holy Ghost. And Christ 
has appointed and delegated this power and authority to his church 
and ministers, for the purpose of keeping impostors from the office. 
Yea, it is the churches defending wall to preserve the sacred ordi- 
nances as delivered her; which fence against imposters she should 
ever keep up, to keep the ordinances valid in their administration, 



14 

by letting none perform them but such as passes her inspection and 
the laying on of the hands of her ministers. And all this is so wisely 
ordered by Christ as to be fixed as a check and balance of power* 
For a church may set apart a deacon or minister, but then a presby- 
tery may check that power by refusing to ordain him to office, by 
laying on of their hands, if they think him unworthy. And so, 
equally so, the church may check the power of the ministry, by re- 
fusing to set a man before them that she thinks unworthy of the of- 
fice. Thu* a concurrence of both these powers are essential to the 
qualifying of an administrator to that office. And a concurrence of 
the church and presbytery is plainly seen in both cases of the ordi- 
nation of Pau! and Barnabas, and the seven deacons; and without this 
concurrence of church and ministry you cannot make a valid admin- 
istrator, and otherwise all be does as to performing ordinances in the 
church are invalid. 

Now, dear brethren, we would willingly pursue this third head of 
a lawful administrator further, but our limits admonish us; therefore, 
we will hasten to a close by couching our ideas on the balance in as 
short a way as we can. And first, it takes a divine commission; 2d, 
it takes a lawful mode of baptism, and that is in the water; 3d, it takes 
a lawful subject, and that is a believer; 4i h, it takes the church to set 
the administrator before the ministers chosen for a presbytery; and 
5th, it takes fasting and prayer by the church, and laying on of hands 
of this chosen ministry, to make a valid administrator or a valid 
scriptural baptism. 

Suppose then a methodist, baptized by immersion himself, and 
then he baptizes a person by immersion that is a believer, and such a 
person come to join one of our churches, is his valid baptism or not ? 
We say not; he should be re-baptized by you. 

Suppose a Free Will Baptist preacher, who himself has been bap- 
tized by immersion, and then baptizes a believer by immersion, and 
such an one comes over to us, is this, a valid baptism ? We say not, 
that such an one should be re baptized by you. 

Suppose one of our own Baptist preachers should baptize a person, 
and that afterwards he should get converted and confess that he was 
baptized in unbelief, would you not baptize him over again ? Surely. 
And why, but because when you baptized him he was an unbeliever, 
and therefore an improper subject of baptisp), but now by his conver- 
sion to God he is a proper subject ? Therefore baptize him again, 
for his first baptism was invalid; and why ? because he was not a 
valid subject. So we say that a Methodist and Free Will Baptism, 
although a law T ful mode and a lawful subject, is not a valid baptism 
for want of a lawful administrator of our faith and order of our 
churches, and our presbytery to confirm it. by their delegated au- 
thority from the church of our faith and order. 

For we consider aright faith, both in the subject and administrator, es- 
sentially necessary to make a valid baptism; for if a man baptizes by im- 
mersion who does not believe this to be the divine mode of baptism, it is 
mockery and hypocrisy; for he as the administrator is doing that for God 
that he don't believe God requires at his hands, and so plays the hypocrite 
to please others and not God, nor as his duty to God. So then it is essenti- 
ally necessary that all administrators should have faith in the right mode, 
which is immersion; and secondly, if a lawful administrator who believes in 
the right mode, baptizes a person he don't believe to be a valid subject of 
baptism, he equally plays the hypocrite and mocks God, by putting a mem- 



15 

ber in the church he don't think at the very time he is doing the act of bap- 
tism to be a valid subject for the church of God — For whatsoever is not of 
faith is sin. 

And further, in order to do things in gospel order it is of necessity that 
the administrator believe in a right mode, and that the valid subject also be- 
lieve in the same right mode; or else for the want of faith the baptism is 
invalid; for none are to be baptized but on a profession of their faith in 
Chris- , and that a true faith as near as the church and administrator can 
judge, both in Christ and the right mode of baptism in order to make a va- 
lid baptism. 

And further, it is essentially necessary that the administrator believe 
with all his heart the doctrine of the gospel, for John the Baptist was a be-i 
liever in Christ and the gospel: Behold the Lamb of God that taketh away 
the sin of the world. — shows it very clearly in his testimony. And it is 
equally clear from scripture, that the apostles believed the doctrine of the 
gospel before they weie baptized and while they baptized; and so should 
all other administrators. Therefore it is requisite that an administrator 
be of our faith and order, in order to make a valid baptism for us; without 
which belief in the doctrine of the gospel we count his act of baptism inva- 
lid. For it is said, Acts, 2. 42: And they continued stedfastly in the apos- 
tles' doctrine and fellowship, and in breaking of bread and in prayers. A- 
gaiiK Acts, 5. 28: Ye have filled Jerusalem with your doctrine, &c.&c. &c. 
which show that the ap>ostles while they preached and baptized had a doc- 
trine, and that was the doctrine of Christ; which was essential tor every ad- 
ministrator and member to believe, in order to fellowship and breaking 
bread in the Lord's Supper, and uniting in prayers; and that in this doc- 
trine they should be stedfast. 

Now, dear brethren, a few words must settle t*ie point as to what was 
this apostolic doctrine; for you must believe they had the doctrine of Christ, 
which may be comprised in this from the New Testament, and proved 
thereby: 1st, God's eternal and unchangeable love to sinners; 2d, his fore- 
knowledge of all persons' sins and events whatsoever; 3d, his eternal choice 
or election in Christ before the world began of his church; 4th, his predes- 
tination, appointment, and ordination to life eternal; 5th, his all powerful 
and effectual call of his elect; 6th, their justification by the righteousness 
of Christ, and final and eternal salvation by him to a single individual cho- 
sen to salvation. Of this faith should all administrators be to make a valid 
baptism, and no man should be admitted by the churches to ordination that 
does not believe this doctrine. 

Again: suppose one of our ministers should be excommunicated from one 
of our churches, and so put out of the fellowship of the church; and he 
then was after his excommunication to baptize a person, and then that per- 
son by km baptized should come over to our churches, must he be baptiz- 
ed or not? We say, yes; and why? because the church put him in office 
by her fellowship and authority, and now by her excommunication and non- 
fellowship she puts him out of office and any authority to baptize; there- 
fore the person he baptized, although by a lawful mode and a lawful sub- 
ject, their baptism is invalid for want of a proper church fellowshipped au- 
thorised administrator to do so, and should be re-baptized by you. For no 
man has a right to administer the ordinances of the church but by her sanc- 
tion and delegated authority, and she can give and take away this at her 
pleasure, and thus bind on earth as said her head and king. 

Suppose one of our ministers should be excommunicated by the church 
for holding to missions and the new schemes of the day, and then he goes 
and joins the missionaries and baptizes a person, is such a baptism valid or 
not? We say not. It is not valid no more than the above; because it mat- 
ters not for what such a minister is excommunicated, whether for heresy, 
immoral conduct, missions, or any thing else, so he stands excommunicated 
and out of the fellowship of the church, no act he performs as a minister is 
valid, whether baptism, the administration of the Lord's Supper, or prea- 
ching the word. For as was said in the other case, the fellowship and au- 
thority of the church put him in the office of baptizing, so his non-fellow- 
ship and excommunicatton put him out of office, and therefore not valid. 
For every church of Christ is vested with independent powe/« from which, 



16 

there is no appeal on earth, but her decisions are final. Hence you»reafl 
of the church at Jerusalem, at Corinth, at Smyrna, at Sardis, 8cc. &c. all 
which were independent bodies of each other and all the world beside in 
matters of her own discipline; having this power delegated to her by her 
head and king to try, and determine, all causes and cases as might respect 
her ministry, doctrine, ordinance, or offences, that might arise in her own 
community and no where else. 

And now, dear brethren, we have only glanced at our subject, without 
the many scriptures and reasons that we could have offered to support this* 
advice. Yet we wish you to ponder upon it and compare it with the scrip- 
tures, and draw your own conclusions therefrom, and act according to the 
scriptures. However we will offer one of our many reasons in support 
of the ground we have taken. Suppose the people of this State were to 
nominate a man to be a magistrate, and the General Assembly was to ap- 
point him to that office, and he was to enter on his office before he took the 
oath that is required of magistrates to take by the sovereignty of the State. 
Question. Would any of his acts be valid? You know not. And why? 
Because he had not taken the oath. But after the oath is taken, all his 
acts are valid as a justice of the peace. Then suppose the General As- 
sembly for some misdemeanor was to declare his office null and void, would 
any act of his be valid after this declaration? You know not; for the sove- 
reign power that gave it took it aAvay. So in like manner every church of 
Christ is a republic and sovereign community. The church nominates and 
appoints a man to the ministry, the presbytery ordains him and swears him 
into office by laying on of hands; then like the magistrate are his acts valid 
and not before. But suppose he like the magistrate should be guilty of 
some misdemeanor — Question. Has not the church the same power to put 
him out of office as the Legislature has a magistrate, and thus render all 
his acts invalid, however much he may assume the office. Then it fol- 
lows that it is the sovereign power and the oath that makes the act valid; 
even so it is the sovereign power, fellowship and ordination of the church of 
Christ that makes the act of the minister valid; and she may give or take 
away at her pleasure for a misdemeanor, 6c the minister is not to be the judge 
in this matter no more than the magistrate, for sovereign power is the arbi- 
trator in all cases. And for to say any way will do to baptize, either by im- 
mersion, or pouring, or sprinkling, or as any subject of baptism may choose, 
is the most foolish and futile argument ever raised about baptism.; for this 
is at once for the subject to make laws for himself, or for sovereign power, 
or for his king, whereas it is sovereign power that has the right to make 
laws and enforce them, and not the right of the subject to choose what kind 
pf law he will or will not obey 

We leave you, dear brethren, with these remarks, stating we have had 
a pleasing Association and all things conducted in peace and good feeling, 
and that harmony and union and love and fellowship abounded among the 
brethren to a high degree. May the good Lord prosper all the churches, 
and quickly if it is his will add to your numbers such as shall be saved; 
and cause all the churches to arise and shine, because the time of refresh- 
ing has come from the presence of the Lord God of Zion, who will not for- 
sake her in her dark and sickly state, but visit her in his own w T ay and in 
his own time. FarewelL 



Tarhoro* Press. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 

Kehukee Baptist Association, 

Held at 

•Martin County 3 J% m orth Carolina^ 

Commencing Saturday before the first Sunday in October, 1838, 



SATURDAY, October 6th, 1838. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was delivered by Elder William My man/ 
from 1 Samuel, iv. chap. 22hd verse: "And she said, the glory is depart- 
ed from Israel: for the ark of (rod is taken. " Prayer by Elder Joseph 
Biggs. 

2. The delegates from the churches then assembled. The Association 
was opened with prayer by Elder Joseph Biggs, when Elder William 
Hyman was chosen Moderator, Elder Joseph Biggs Clerk, who called 
to his assistance brethren Joseph D. Biggs and R. M. G. Moore, as As- 
sistants. 

3. Brethren in the ministry, (present,) from sister Associations, were 
invited to seats with us, when, Elders Burwell Temple, Mark Bennett, 
John I. Stadler, and Lemuel I. Puckett, seated themselves. 

4. Letters from 31 churches were read, and the names of the delegates 
enrolled, and the representation stated in the table of churches. 

5. Petitionary letters for membership in this Association were called 
for, when one from Sandy Grove (Nash county) was handed in by their 
delegate, Isaac Stricklin, and read; and they were received by the Mod- 
erator giving their delegate the right hand of fellowship. Another from 
the church at Quankey, (Halifax county,) was handed in and read; but, 
as her delegates were absent, she could not be constitutionally received. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister Associations were called for, 
when one from White Oak Association was handed forward by one of their 
messengers, Lemuel I. Puckett, accompanied with forty copies of her last 
Minutes, and the letter read. Also, a verbal correspondence was receiv- 
ed from the Contentnea Association by one of their messengers, Elder 
Mark Bennett, their letter failing to come to hand, with forty copies of her 
last Minutes. Also, a verbal correspondence from the Country Line As- 
sociation by their messengers Elder John I. Stadler and George T. Cog- 
gin, with twenty copies of her last Minutes. All were thankfully received, 







c- 


555 


b H b 


Si 


"^ 


9 ^ 


Names of Churches and 


1 


•J 


R 


_ :i ' 


OS 


re 

re 


1. 


| 


1 s 


Counties where 


MINISTERS AND DELEGATES. 1 


n 


^fiS 


>> 


1 


§ 


O 


S- 


a 


situatedi 




re 




re* 


5 


§. 


si 


.*8 


1 




re 
^4* 


5* 


§c 






28 


p Cts 


1 Beargrass, Martin county, 


WM. WHITAKER, James Harrison, 




1 75 


2 BlounVs Creek, Beaufort,- 


Lodwick Reddick, John R. Phil pot, 


1 






1 


1 




30 


1 l 50 


3 Cowenjock, Currituck, 


SAMUEL TATUM,* 


1 


1 




3 


11 




60 


1 1 


4 Conoko, Martin^ 


Nathan F. Hooker. John Bryan, 














41 


i 1 


5 don doe, Edgecombe, 


JOHN H. DANIEL, Richard E, Rleves, 










1 




3R 


1 1 50 


6 Concord, Washington* 


MICAJAH AMBROSE,* Dan'l Clifton,* 1 






2 


2 




30 


I * 


7 Cross Roach, Edgecombe, 


WILLIAM HYMAN, Joseph h Pippen, 


1 




2 






37 


I 1 


8 Cedar I4and, Carteret, — 


Thomas Roherson, Thomas Day,* 




1 








35 


I 2 


9 Deep Creek, Halifax, — 


William Whitehead, 








3 




23 


9 5Q 


10 Falls Tar River, Nash, — 


Robert Sorey,* James S. Battle, 


1 


1 


3 


5 




70 


1 2 12 


1 1 Flat Swamp, Pitt, — 


Wmx TV, K, PMlpot, Irvin Page, 




1 


o 


2 




44 


i 1 


12 Flatty CV'A, Pasquotank,- 


Benj'n T. Pendleton,* Francis Fletcher,*! 












12 


1 2 


13 Frying Pan, Tyrrell, — f 


- 














18 


1 


14 Goose^ Creek, Beaufort, — 


James Potter, Henry Oarrow,* 










1 


l 


11 


1 * 


15 Great Swamp, Pitt, — 


Hardy Whitchard. John Y\ hitchard, 










4 


l 


65 


1 l 


16 Kekukce, Halifax, — 


Asa Jones,* Reuben Higgs,* 














132 


1 75 


17 Lawrenee's M, Ih Edg'e, 


JOSHUA LAWRENCE,* R'd Harrison, 










1 




66 


1 1 50 


18 Little AW gat or ;Yynei\,--\ 


. 














6 


1 


19 Moraitock, Washington, - 


Wilson W. Mizell, William Cray, 






1 


1 


1 




80 


1 * 25 


20 North Creek, Beaufort, — 


Henry Blount, Noah Gaskill, 












l 


40 


1 1 50 


21 Old Ford, Beaufort, — f 


- 














9 


1 


22 Picot M, II. Martin, — f 


_ 














31 


8 


23 FowePs PoiW,Currit'k,-f 


_ 














13 


1 


24 Fun go, Beaufort, — 


Solomon Carter, John Clark, 










1 


2 


16 


8 i 


25 Rocky Swamp, Halifax, - 


Lemuel B. Bennett, H. W. Shearin, 




I 


2 




1 




55 


i 


26 Sappony, Nash, — 


A. B. Baines, Jun, Crawford Baker, 






1 


1 


2 




60 


i 


27 Scuppernong, Tyrrell, — f 


_ _ 














17 




28 So. Mattamuskeet, Hyde, 


GEO, W. CARRO WAN, R. M.G.Moore, 


1 


5 


1 


4 


6 




56 


2 12 


29 So, Quay, So'ampton, Va. 


EDWIN HARRISON, John Martin, 




1 










48 


2 


30 Skewarkey, Martin, 


JOSEPH BIGGS, Sen. JOHN WARD. 


1 




1 




4 




64 


1 50 


3 1 Sin ifhwic/rs Cr\k, Marti n ,- 


MICAJAH PERRY, H. STALLINGS, 










1 




20 


5® 


32 Sound Side, Tyrrell, — f 


- 














21 




33 Spring Green, Martin, — 


John Griffin, Stephen Outterb ridge, 


2 








4 




35 


1 


34 Tarhoro\ Edgecombe, — 


Coffield King, Ely Porter,* 




2 






2 




46 


1 1 


35 Washington, Beaufort, — 


Levin Wallace, Jacob Swindell, 


3 


2 


1 




1 




42 


i 1 


36 White Plains, Beaufort, - 


MILES E VERITT,* Jonathan Wallace,* 
















1 




John Haborn, 


3 


2 


1 




1 




42 


1 1 


37 WilUcbitm x 8 M. II, Edge- 




















combe, — | 


- _ , 














36 




33 Samdy Grove, Nash, — 


fsaac Stricklin, - 


13 


1G 


11 


7 9 


55 




59 


1 




5,1116 


36 50 



NOTE. Pastors of churches and other ordained Ministers are in CAPITALS; unordained Minis- 
ters in italicr, those marked thus * were not present; from churches marked thus f we received no 
intelligence, in that case their number stands as last represented; dashes — denote no pastors; the 
last column shows the contributions from the churches to the Association fund. 

7. The following committees were appointed, (viz:) James 8. Battle 
and Joseph J. Pippen, on finance; James 8. Battle to write a letter of 
correspondence to the Contentnea Association; Joseph J. Pippen, to the 
White Oak Association; John H. Daniel, to the Little River Associa- 
tion; and, Richard E. iiieves, to the Country Line Association; Mark 
Bennett, John I. Stadler, Burwell Temple, and William Hyman, to exam- 
ine the Circular Letter. The above committees to report on Monday next. 

8. Skiers Mark Bennett, Burwell Temple, and John I, Stadler were 
requested (by private ballot) to occupy the stage on the morrow, by preach- 
ing; and that divine service commeu e at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by Elder John I. Stadler, 
until Monday next 9 o'clock, A. M. 



3 

SUNDAY, October 7th, 1838. 
The services of the day were commenced by Elder Mark Bennett, who 
preached from i Corinthians, xv. chap. 55,56,57 verses: <*0 death, where 
is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory? The sting of death is sin, and 
the strength of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, which givcth us the 
victory, through our Lord Jesus Christ." Elder Burwell Temple fol- 
lowed, and preached from St. John, xv. chap. 5th verse: "I am the vine, 
ye are the branches: He that abideth in me, and I in him, the same bring- 
eth forth much fruit: for without me ye can do nothing." Elder John I. 
Stadler closed and preached from Psalms, xxxvi;, 39th verse: "But the 
salvation of the righteous is of the Lord: he is their strength in the time 
of trouble." Prayer by Eider William Hyman. 

MONDAY, October 8th, 1838. 

9. The committees appointed on Saturday last were called on to report, 
when brother Joseph J. Pippen, who was appointed to write a letter of 
correspondence to the White Oak Association, presented one; which was 
read and approved, signed by the Moderator and Clerk, and Elder John 
H. Daniel and brother 11. M. G. Moore were appointed messengers to 
bear the same to her with sundry copies of our last minutes. Elder John 
H. Daniel, who was appointed to write to the Little River Association, 
presented one; which was read and approved, signed by the Moderator 
and Clerk, and Elder Joshua Lawrence and brethren Richard Harrison 
and James S. Battle appointed delegates to bear the same to her, with 
sundry copies of our Minutes. Brother Richard E. Rieves, who was ap- 
pointed to write to the Contentnea Association, presented one; which was 
read and approved, signed by the Moderator and Clerk, and Richard E. 
Rieves, William Thigpen, and W. W. K. Philpot were appointed to bear 
the same to them, with sundry copies of our Minutes. 

The committee appointed to examine the Circular Letter wrote by El- 
der Joshua Lawrence, reported, that they had performed that duty, and 
recommend it to this body, and that it be read in this Association; and 
the same was done, and it was-approved and ordered to be attached to 
these Minutes. 

The committee on finance reported, that they find in the hands of the Trea- 
surer at the close of last Association the sum of $93 29 

Received in contributions at this Association from the different churches 

that compose it, the sum of - - - - - 37 67 

$130 96 
Paid for the printing of the Minutes for 1837, the sum of - $40 00 

Preparing the Minutes of this Association for 1837 for the press, su- 
perintending the printing, recording one copy on the records of 
this Association, and distributing to the churches belonging to this 
body and to the sister Associations with whom we correspond as usual, 15 00 



55 00 



Leaving a balance now in the hands of the Treasurer of $75 96 

The Association concurred with the report. 

10. On petition from the church at Hunting Quarters for a dismission 
from this body to join any other Association of the same faith and order, 
Resolved, that they be dismissed from us for that purpose, and that the 
Clerk issue the same under the signature of the Moderator and Clerk, The 
same was done. 



11. Resolved, that our next Association be held with Pungo church, 
at Bethel meeting house, Beaufort county, to commence on Saturday before 
the Hist Sunday in October, 1889; and that Elder William Hyman be re- 
quested to deliver an Introductory Sermon to that body, and in case of his 
failure, Elder John II. Daniel; and that worship commence at 11 o'- 
clock, A. M; 

12. Elder Joseph Biggs is requested to write our next Circular Letter, 
on any subject that he may deem proper. 

13. Elder Joseph Biggs is requested to prepare these Minutes for the press, 
superintend the printing of 800 copies thereof, and distribute them as usual. 
The Association was then adjourned with prayer by Elder Joseph Bisjgs, 
to the time and place appointed. WILLIAM HYMAN, Mod'r. 

JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk. 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 

The Kehitkec •Association now silling at Spring Green meeting house, Afar tin coun- 
ty, North Carolina^ o the several churches that compose that body— October, 1838. 

Dear and beloved brethren and sis- 
ters: We have thought on various subjects 



for a Circular Letter, but knowing that the 
Kehukee Association has been established 
for about sixty years, and having seen a 
great variety of Circular Letters written 
on important subjects by that body to the 
churches, we are at a loss which way to 
steer our course most to your profit and 
edification, and not stumble on ground for- 
merly occupied by our forefathers in their 
Circulars; although you need to be put in 
remembrance of many things already writ- 
ten by the worthies of ancient times, such 
as the pure doctrine of the gospel, the sup- 
port of the ministry, a holy life, good 
works, brotherly love, and a non-confor- 
mity to the world, &c. &c. 

We shall at this time send you a Circu- 
lar written on THE LAWS OF GOD, 
which we think the churches have not re- 
ceived heretofore, of old or new time, from 
any Association whatever. And we 
only expect to sketch at so important a 
subject as the laws of God by Moses, for 
the world — and his church, as found writ- 
ten in the New Testament, by Christ & his 



And secondly, we do not intend to take 
notice of the civil laws of God, imposed on 
the Hebrew nation by Moses, as by God's 
authority; as it. is our opinion, that every 
nation has the right to make its own civil 
laws, and that every generation of men 
have the same right to revoke all laws of 
the former generation, and make laws for 
themselves as may best suit their state and 
condition. For if one generation have a 
right to make laws for themselves, the next 
have the same right; but with this proviso, 
that all laws made by any civil society 
must be founded in virtue, justice and 
equity, between man and man, or else they 
infringe on the laws of God and the con- 
sciences of men. And any man may rebel 
against such laws, made otherwise, and 
have a good conscience towards God, and it 
is a crime in men to obey unjust laws. But 
neither the civil laws of the Jews, nor 
their laws of ceremonies, were intended 
for any other nation but the Jews; altho' 
the Christian nations have extracted much 
of their laws therefrom. 

Thirdly, we come to what is generally 
termed the moral law, or law of God; or 



apostles — as it would make a volume in- , in other words, the law of ten command- 



stead of a Circular, to discuss this matter 
to the full. 

And first, we do not intend to take no- 
tice of the ceremonial law of types and 
shadows, as they were peculiar to the 
Jews, as figures of good things to come; 
and were never imposed on any other na- 
tion but them by God, the author of those 
laws to the Jews. 



ments. This law is binding, and given as 
the rule of obedience of men to God, to all 
men, to all women, and to all nations, 
whether heathen, Jewish, Mahometan, pa- 
gan, or Christian; for their strict and con- 
tinual and unqualified observance at all 
times and all places, and cursed is the man 
that continues not to do all things written 
in the book of this law, from Adam to the 



end oflhe world. No man has any right 
to add, revoke, or Iter, one part or particle 
of this law; being the unchangeable and ir- 
revocable law of the most high God, given 
to man in his creation, to demand and en- 
force obedience from all the generations of 
Adam to the end of the world, under the 
penalty of God's curse by the law, to be 
punished with strict and impartial justice 
on all transgressorsof it in time andeternity. 
Fourthly, the design of laws and pen- 
alties is to prevent and correct our vices, 
both in principle and practice; or in other 
words, to prevent our carrying bad princi- 
ples into practice, to the dishonor of God 
or injury to our neighbors. Thus the law 
may be compared to a wall to hedge us in 
the bounds of right, and doing right to 
God and man; and to keep us from going 
astray to do that to God or our neighbor 
that is wrong. Again, the law may be 
compared to a lamp of light, showing us 
beforehand the crime and the sad conse- 
quence of doing wrong, with the penalty 
annexed, to fear and shun the crime. A- 
gain, it may be compared to a rule to mea- 
sure our principles and practices by, that 
we may see our good and bad conduct to- 
wards God or man. Again, it may be 
compared to a schoolmaster, to teach us our 
miserable condition as sinners, that we may 
see the need of a Christ. In a word, the 
law of ten commandments denies nothing 
nor commands nothing that is not benefi- 
cial to men in this life and that which is to 
come; and best to comply with, for our 
present and future good. 

Fifthly, the law may be divided into 
two parts, that is, its commands to do, and 
its commands not to do; both equally penal. 
And again, it may be divided into two more 
parts, as respects principle, and as respects 
practice; but limits forbid a full discussion. 
First, then, we shall take a short notice 
of the commands to do. A law is the de- 
clared will of a superior or sovereign in 
power, to oblige men to perform what is 
pleasing in his sight to himself or to others, 
and to avoid that which is offensive to him 
or others; and in scripture sense means the 
same with commandments, statutes, or pre- 
cepts. This law of ten commandments 
was in the most solemn and terrible man- 
ner, proclaimed from the top of Mount Si- 
nai by God himself, amidst thunder, light- 
ning, blackness, darkness, and flames of 
fire, and written by God himself twice on 
tables of stone. 

The first and great commandment, as 



expounded by our Saviour, is, to love the- 
Lord thv God with all thy heart, and with 
all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This 
is the first and great commandment. And 
the second is like unto it: Thou shalt love 
thy neighbor as thyself. On these two 
commandments hang all the law and the 
prophets. Here, dear brethren, we have 
our Saviour putting his hand as it were on 
the whole Old Testament, and comprising 
the whole duty of man in a few words. 
And Paul savs, love is the fulfilling of law. 
But where is the man that has this heaven- 
born principle, this principle of love to 
God with all his heart, and his neighbor as 
himself? Is this person to be found among 
men? No, in nowise. Then all mankind 
stand condemned for want of this principle 
of love to God and man, being born with- 
out this principle the law requires at the 
hands of all men. which the law commands 
us to do, that is, to love God and man. 
So then, all mankind are condemned for 
not complying with this part of the law of 
God; which commands to do, in principle 
and love to God, is not a principle that 
grows in the garden of nature, but is of 
heavenly birth in its origin, in creation, and 
regeneration. The rest of the ten com- 
mands of God are all comprised in this, al- 
tho' they command not to do; such as, thou 
shalt not steal, covet, violate the Sabbath, 
kill, &c. for love worketh no ill to his 
neighbor. But most men think they are 
condemned for doing those acts that the 
law forbids, such as killing, &c. ; but the 
truth is, men are equally condemned for 
not doing what the law commands, such 
as loving God and our neighbor; for these 
are requirements of the law to do, as well 
as killing, stealing, and adultery, are re- 
quirements of the law not to do. So thai: 
we are damned for not doing, as well as 
damned for doing; and more so, since on 
love to God and our neighbor hang all the 
law and the prophets, and love is the fulfil- 
ling the law. Then we shall put it down as 
a law truth, that all mankind will be damn- 
ed, that do not obtain somewhere and some- 
how love to God and their neighbor; be- 
cause the law requires this at their hands* 
as much as not to do those acts that the 
law forbids. 

Leaving the laws of God by Moses, 
which we conceive to be binding en all 
mankind, and by which is the knowledge 
of sin, and by which mankind will be judg- 
ed at the last day, and by which all "man- 
kind in a state of nature stand condemned 



6 

before God in all their generations, con- 
cerning which we might say a thousand 
things, we design to pass over to the New 
Testament; which contains the laws of Je- 
sus Christ, by himself and apostles, for the 
obedience of the church of God in "this 
world, in all nations and in all generations 
to the end of the world. And is as un- 
changeable and eternal, without alteration, 
as the laws of God by Moses; to which no 
man or set of men have any right to add or 
diminish a part or particle. And which 
laws of Jesus Christ have a penalty to be 
inflicted on his children, as well as the 
laws of Moses have on servants. 

First, then, we shall endeavor to prove 
that the New Testament contains laws or 
commandments, or rules, for the church of 
God. John, 15. 12: This is my com- 
mandment, that ye love one another, as I 
have loved you. 17th verse: These things 
I command you, that ye love one another. 
Titus, 1. 3: Which is committed unto me 
according to the commandment of God our 
Saviour. 2 Peter, 2. 21: Than, after they 
have known it, to turn from the holy com 
mandment delivered unto them. 2 Peter, 
3. 2: That ye may be mindful of the 
words which were spoken before by the 
holy prophets, and of the commandment 
of us the apostles of the Lord and Saviour. 
These we deem sufficient, or else twenty 
others can be given to prove that the. gos- 
pel and epistles in the New Testament, 
contain commands for the strict and une- 
quivocal observance of the church of 
Christ; and she has no right to add to or 
disannul any of them in the least, as Christ 
has never delegated any man or set of men 
with power since the apostles, to make 
laws for his church; nor never will, we 
presume, to the end of the world. They 
should then stand, as the unchangeable 
laws of his church, unadulterated by the ad- 
ditions of men's inventions or traditions, in 
all ages of his church on earth; and the 
church is bound to obey them as her head, 
husband and sovereign Lord God, under 
penalty of hisdispleasure, &c. 

Believing on this point, dear and belov- 
ed brethren, that } ? ou will freel} 7 admit that 
alone in, the New Testament is found laws 
or commandments, or precepts, or rules, or 
examples, for the church of God; and that 
no other book contains commandments for 
the church of God to be governed by, but 
that, without church additions or minis- 
terial commandments. We shall now 
merely sketch some of those laws to the 



churches we represent, with short explana- 
tions. 

And first, we shall begin with the laws 
of Christ to ministers of his gospel. No 
man*, whether saint or sinner, has any right 
to the office of a minister, no more than 
Aaron had to the priest office, unless he is 
called of God to fill that station; and God 
gives him gifts of grace so to do, as he did 
Paul. For he was called of God to be an 
apostle, and unto him was grace given to 
preach among the Gentiles the unsearcha- 
ble riches of Christ. For all God's minis- 
ters are the gift of God to his church for her 
edification, as this text proves: Ephesians, 
4. 11: And lie gave some, apostles; and 
some, prophets; and some, evangelists; 
and some, pastors and teachers; verse 12. 
For the perfecting of the saints, for the 
work of the ministry, for the edifi f fng of 
the body of Christ: (which means his 
church.) Again, 1 Corinthians, 12. 28: 
And God hath set some in the church, first 
apostles, secondarily prophets, thirdly tea- 
chers, after that miracles, then gifts of heal- 
ings, helps, governments, diversities of 
tongues. Again, Romans, 12. 6: Having 
then gifts differing according to the grace 
that is given to us, whether prophecy, let 
us prophecy according to proportion of 
faith; verse 7. Or ministry, Jet us wait on 
our ministering: or he that teacheih, on 
teaching: or he that exhorteth, on exhort- 
ation, &c. These texts clear the point, 
that all ministers, &c. are the gift of God to 
his church, and have gifts given them for 
her benefit to edification, and perfecting the 
saints in knowledge and holiness of life, to 
the glory of God - by us the ministers of his 
truths to the church, that she may grow in 
grace and in the knowledge of our Lord Je- 
sus Christ, whom to know with God is life 
eternal. Then no man has a right to be a 
minister except God call him to that office, 
and gives him gifts to fill it to the edifica- 
tion of his church. How shall they preach 
except they be sent? If any man speak, 
let him speak as of out of the ability God 
giveth,or speak as the oracles of God. So 
let it be, it is God's way and best way. 

The next thing we notice is, his law after 
he has called and qualified his minister or 
ministers concerning their setting out to 
preach, and the manner how. Luke, 9. 2: 
And he sent them to preach the kingdom 
of God, (or gospel,) and to heal the sick, 
verse 3. And he said unto them, Take no- 
thing for your journey, neither staves, nor 
scrip, (bag,) neither bread, neither money: 



neither have two coats apiece. 4. And 
whatsoever house ye enter into, there a- 
bide, and thence depart. 5. And whosoev- 
er will not receive you, when ye go out of 
that city, shake off the very dust from your 
feet for a testimony against them. 6. And 
they departed, and went through the towns, 
preaching the gospel, &c. Matthew, 10. 
9: Provide neither gold, nor silver, nor 
brass in your purses; 10. Nor scrip for 
your journey, neither two coats, neither 
shoes, nor yet staves: (for the workman 
[God's minister,] is worthy of his meat.) 
Read the chapter. Mark, 6. 7: And he 
calleth unto him the twelve, and began to 
send them forth by two and two; and gave 
them power over unclean spirits; S. And 
commanded them (mark that word, and 
commanded them,) that they should take 
nothing for their journey, save a staff on- 
ly; no scrip, no bread, no money in their 
purse: 9 But he shod with sandals; and 
not put on two coats, &c. &c. Read the 
chapter. Luke, 10. 4: Carry neither 
purse, nor scrip, nor shoes: and salute no 
man by the way. Luke, 22. 35: And he 
said unto them, when I sent you without 
purse, and scrip, and shoes, lacked ye any 
thing? And they said, nothing. 36. Then 
said he unto them, but now he that hath a 
purse, let him take it, and likewise his 



other law, a law not found recorded among 
the laws of Jesus Christ; for his ministers 
setting out to preach his gospel. For 
proof of which, dear brethren, onl} 7 ob- 
serve a few things. In these days, a young 
minister to Burmah or elsewhere, must 
have his hundreds of dollars as an outfit to 
the place the missionary board and not 
God has appointed him, and to where he is 
willing to go for money. We would just 
ask ) 7 ou, did Jonah have any outfit to 
preach to the Ninevites? Did Peter have 
any outfit to preach to Cornelius and house? 
Did Paul and Barnabas have any outfit 
when they went to preach to the heathen 
Gentiles? Say, brethren, can you find 
such an example, such a precept or com- 
mandment, among the laws of Jesus 
Christ in the New Testament? You know 
you cannot. Then say, such laws are of 
men and the devil, and write it down in 
capitals, PRIESTCRAFT— a law of 
priests, and not of Christ nor his apostles 
— null, forever null and void, and not obli- 
gatory on the church of God nor his minis- 
ters. Much less to speak of selling mem- 
berships, hired agents, hired preachers, &c. 
&c Is there found among the laws of Je- 
sus Christ, that a young minister or an old 
one, is thereby to fill his purse and then go 
his tour of preaching in his fine coat he has 



scrip, &c. And Paul said, when he was got by selling memberships, or hiring him 
called to preach, he strait way conferred self to boards for a dollar a day? Say, at 



not with flesh and blood 

These texts we deem sufficient, or else 
more could be adduced, to prove the laws 



once, that these examples, precepts, and 
commandments, are not to be found among 
the laws of Jesus Christ for his ministers 



of Jesus Christ on his ministers setting out ! nor church, nor has the church nor minis- 
to preach, and his plan how; or, in a word, I ters any right from Christ to make any new 
these are the laws of Jesus Christ for his ' laws for church or ministers. These were 
ministers setting out to preach the gospel ; made by Christ and his apostles, and no 



in the first age of the gospel church; arid 
are binding on all ages of his ministers to 
the end of the world, unless it can be 
shown that Christ Jesus has revoked or al- 
tered thase laws, which we, dear brethren, 
know cannot be done from any record un 



man or set of men have a right from Christ 
to add to or diminish therefrom. More, 
but limits will not admit. 

We proceed upon the laws of Christ to 
ministers, but only in a short way. Luke, 
12. 42: And the Lord said, who then is 



der heaven, having his seal of commission ! that faithful and wise steward, whom his 
and miracles to attest the same, with his, 1 lord shall make ruler over his household, 
way how a young minister should set out. (by household you are to understand the 
to preach the gospel to mankind, or the! church of Christ, for the church is his fa- 
nations of the earth. And we are aston- > mily,) to give them their portion of meat 
ished how exactly these laws apply to the in due season? (mark that word, due sea- 
characters of the Old School Baptists, ever j son.) 43. Blessed is that servant, whom 
since the establishment of the Philadel- his ford when he cometh shall find so do- 
phia, Kehukee, and Charleston Associa- j ing. 44. Of a truth I say unto you, that 
tions, that they have gone forth from the j he will make him ruler over all that he 



handles of the plough and their various oc 
cupations, according to the laws of Jesus, to 
this day. But New Schoolism teaches an- 



hath. 45. But if that servant say in his 
heart, my lord dela3'eth his coming; and 
shall begin to beat the men servants, and 



Ipaidens, and to eat and drink, and to be 
drunken; 46 The lord of that servant will 
come in a day when he looketh not for 
him,&c. Read the chapter, But this, in 
a short way, is the sum of the parable: 
Christ calls and qualifies ministers to over- 
see his church and feed them with pure 
gospel in due season; and if the minister 
fails so to do, he will be punished by Christ 
as his crimes deserve, in appointing him 
his portion with unbelievers, (verse 46.) 
So then no minister called of Christ has a 
right to draw back, or fail feeding the 
church of Christ in due season with pure 
gospel reproof and rebuke, with all long 
suffering and patience, looking to Christ 
for the reward of his labors of love- 
Acts, 20. 28: Take heed therefore unto 
yourselves, and to all the flock over the 
which the Holy Ghost hath made you 
overseers, to feed the church of God, which 
he hath purchased with his own blood. 
Read 29th and 30th verses to show minis- 
ters why they should do so, because of 
grievous wolves not sparing the flock, 
(false teachers are meant by wolves;) who 
do not spare their erroneous doctrine, nor 
to fleece the flock for gain by their errors, 
as do the new schemers of the day for tens 
of thousands of dollars, of saint or sinner, 
by their church traffic in memberships, 
agencies, outfits and hired beggars, run- 
ning to and fro to make merchandize of the 
saints. Damnable heresies, and the church 
of Christ has fully felt the punishment of 
such punishing or damnable new schemes, 
yet there are some that will not learn when 
you give them line upon line and precept 
upon precept. So let it be. God shall 
«end them strong delusions, that they 
might believe a lie that they might 
be damned who believe not the truth. 
And is there any truth in the new schemes 
of the day, when they are not among the 
laws of Jesus Christ for his ministers or 
church? Why, you know not. But that 
the new schemes are all lies, when they 
say the Lord says when he has not said any 
such thing in his laws. Then call the new 
schemes all lies, and men-made lies for 
ministers and church to obey; when Jesus 
has said no such thing in his laws. Priest- 
craft, priestcraft, we say. lie that hath 
ears to hear let him hear. Again, 1 Pe- 
ter, 5. 2/1 Feed the flock of God which is 
among you, taking the oversight thereof, 
not by constraint, but willingly; not for 
filthy lucre, but of a ready mind; 3. Nei- 
ther as being lords over God's heritage, 



but. being ensamples to the flock. Here in 
the above text is a solemn charge by the 
law of Christ to his. ministers, to feed his 
church and to take the oversight of his 
church; not by constraint of boards, church 
bishops, or popes; but willingly, which 
they Gannot do unless God makes them 
willing. And that they are not to serve 
churches or boards for hire, or filthy gain, 
or lucre; but of a ready mind, knowing in 
themselves God has called and qualified 
them so to do. Peter, feed my sheep, feed 
my lambs; if you love me, love my sheep 
and lambs; oversee them, watch for their 
souls and feed them, if you love me; feed 
them for the love you bear them and me. 
The poor have the gospel preached unto 
them. Then away with your hired prea- 
chers and beggars — God's ministers serve 
hischnrch from higher principles than mo- 
ney, even from love to Christ and saints; 
and when they feel their breasts are full of 
milk, they desire, ready and willingly to 
suckle God's dear children without money 
or any other filthy lucre sake. And in so 
doing their ease, peace, quietness and good 
conscience are found to themselves and 
joy of the saints. 

2 Timothy, 4. 2: Preach the word; be 
instant in season, out of season; reprove, 
rebuke, exhort with all long-suffering and 
doctrine. 1 Timothy, 3. 2: A bishop then 
must be blameless, the husband of one 
wife, vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, 
given to hospitality, apt to teach; 3. Not 
given to wine, no striker, not greedy of 
filthy lucre; but patient; not a brawler, 
not covetous. 4. One that ruleth well his 
own house, having his children in subjec- 
tion with all gravity; 5. (For if a man 
know not how ^o rule his own house, how 
shall he take care of the church of God?) 
7. Moreover, he must have a good report 
of them which are without; (that is, with- 
out the church.) 1 Timothy, 4, 15: Me- 
ditate upon these things; give thyself 
wholly to them, that thy profiting may ap- 
pear to all. 14. Neglect not the gift that 
is in thee, which was given, &c. 16. Take 
heed unto thyself, and unto thy doctrine; 
continue in them; &c. 2 Timothy, 2. 2; 
And the things that thou hast heard of me 
among many witnesses, the same commit 
thou to faithful men, who shall be able to 
teach others also. 3. Thou therefore en- 
dure hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus 
Christ. 4. No man that warreth entan- 
gleth himself with the affairs of this life; 
that he may please him who hath chosen 



him to be a soldier. These and a thousand 
olher exhortations and laws are found in 
the New Testament, for the ministers of 
God strictly to attend to; to which we on- 
ly designed to call the attention of the min 



9 

bution also. Acts, 6. 1: And in those 
days, when the number of the disciples 
was multiplied, there arose a murmuring 
of the Grecians against the Hebrews, be- 

i cause their widows were neglected in the 



filers of the Kehukee Association, for stu- | daily ministration. 2. Then the twelve 
dy and meditation on the laws of Jesus \ (apostles) called the multitude of the disci- 
Christ, that they might study them from i pies unto them, and said, it is not reason 
the Book and observe them strictly, and ' 
execute them in their own conduct and in 



the church of God accordingly to her bene- 
fit. As it would fill a volume to express and 
expound the laws of Christ concerning the 
ministers of his gospel, we refer you, dear 
brethren in the ministry, to the Book; and 
hope you will read the laws of Christ, and 
study them for your own good and the 
good of the church of God; for this we 
deem a mere sketch of the laws of Christ 
for his ministers. 

Secondly, we come to the laws of Jesus 
Christ concerning deacons, who fill the se- 
cond office in the church of Christ. For 
there are not found in the New Testament 
any other officers in the church of God but 
bishops, or ministers, or preachers, which 
are different names for the same office; or 
presbyteries, which are composed of min- 
isters; and the office of deacons. There is 
no such office in the New Testament as 
pope, cardinal, arch-bishop, sexton, church 
warden, friar, monk, or nun — or agent, 
hireling, beggar, president, vice president, 
secretary, corresponding secretary, or au- 
ditor — with all the devil's train of money- 
ed machinery, to make money for priest- 
hirelings, Balaam-like, to curse our Bap- 
tist Israel. So says the Kehukee Associa- 
tion. 

First then, the laws of Christ for qualifi- 
cations of men for the office of deacon; as 
this law shows that all saints are not quali- 
fied for that office in the church of God. 
So then, their qualifications are specified 
in the laws of Christ, and particularly 
pointed out by the law. 

Now let it be remembered what gave 
rise to the office of deacon in the church of 
God, that the first Christians sold their hou- 
ses and lands, and laid down the money at 
the apostles' feet, for distribution to all the 
Christian community that had need; and 
that such was the confidence of the first 
Christians in the apostles, that they left it 
to them to regulate the whole Christian 
community and its temporal concerns; and 
that while the number of the disciples 
were few, they did and could attend to their 
ministry with promptness, and the distri- 



that we should leave the word of God, and 
serve tables, (mark that word tables, in 
the plural.) 3. Wherefore, brethren, look 
ve out among you seven men of honest re- 
port, full of the Holy Ghost and wisdom, 
whom we may appoint over this business. 
4. But we will give ourselves continually 
to prayer, and to the ministry of the word. 
Preachers of the Kehukee Association, 
mark these words of the apostles, continu- 
ally to prayer, and to the ministry of the 
word. Do so, and the Lord God shall 
bless you in time and eternity. 5. And 
the saying pleased the whole multitude: 
(that is, of the disciples,) & they chose, &c. 
Thus we see the office of apostle and the 
office of deacon first blended and united in 
the apostles, in the first age of the gospel 
church; but after this, they became two 
distinct offices, or distinct men in the 
church of God. And it has never since 
required an apostle or minister to be a dea- 
con in the church of God, nor to fill that 
office. But mark the qualifications of these 
first deacons: men of honest report, lest 
the church should censure him as a thief, 
because he has the bag of the church, Ju- 
das-like; full of the Holy Ghost, for this 
alone can make men honest to God and 
men in all their dealings; and wisdom, be- 
cause it takes wise men to deal out of free 
funds to others as their need may require. 

And from that day to this, we say, that 
ministers of the gospel have nothing to do 
with the distribution or funds of the church 
of God; but that this devolves on the of- 
fice of deacon, wholly and fully to attend 
to the secular affairs of the church of God. 
And here we could say much about mis- 
sionary priests and boards, who have as 
good as turned all deacons out of office and 
taken the office to themselves, to attend to 
the moneyed affairs of the church. And 
well they may, seeing in their caucus they 
vote the money to the priest and not the 
poor, as was designed of this office in the 
first instance for deacons to do. All the 
devils in hell never invented a greater per- 
version of the scriptures and office of dea- 
con, than the missionary priests have done, 
to give church collections to priests and 



10 



not one cent to the poor— the Roman Ca- 
tholics not exempted, in all their foul, de- 
ceitful, hypocritical, and money making 
schemes, by praying out of purgatory, 
mass lor the dead, absolutions, indulgen- 
ces, investitures, or paying Peter's pence. 
We now come to the laws of Jesus 
Christ concerning the qualifications ot dea- 
cons to fill that office. And if any man 
or set of men ordains to the office of min 
ister or deacon, any man that they in their 
best judgment think does not come up to 
those laws in his qualifications given by 
Jesus Christ, transgresses Christ's laws. 
And again, let those first be proved, and 
then let them use the offi< e of deacon. 

1 Timothy, 3. 8: Likewise must the 
deacons be grave, not double-tongued, not 
given to much wine, not greedy of filthy 
lucre, 9. Holding the mystery of the faith 
in a pure conscience. 10 And let these 
also (with ministers) first be proved; then 
let tliem use the office of a deacon, being 
found blameless. II. Even so must their 
wives be grave, not slanderers, sober, 
faithful in all things. 12. Let the dea- 
cons be the husbands of one wife, ruling 
their children and their own houses well 
13. For they that have used the office of a 
deacon well, purchase to themselves a good 
degree, and great boldness in the faith 
which is in Christ Jesus. These are tin- 
laws of Jesus Christ concerning deacons 
and their wives, and no man or set of men 
have a right to ordain a man to that office, 
that does not come up to the rule here 
J given by Paul as a law for the ordination 
of deacons, to the best of his judgment 
on their qualifications, as here given b) 
Paul. 

We now come to the deacons fulfilling 
their office, which seems heretofore le 
have bad no impression on the minds ol 
deacons, no more than if they were other 
private members of the churches in the Ke 
hukee Association; and we doubt not, that 
it is the case of other churches and As 
sociations as well as ours. And first, all 
funds given or belonging to any church, 
should be transmitted through the hands ol 
the deacon of that church; for there can be 
no doubt, that as soon as the seven dea 
cons were chosen by the church at Anti- 
och and ordained to that office, that the 
apostles, who had held heretofore the con- 
tributions of the brethren for the poor 



y<\\nis and made to them distribution as 
i hey had need, delivered up all moneys in 
their hands to the seven deacons, whose 
business it was to make distribution to the 
Grecian widows as they thought their 
needs might require, without or to prevent 
the murmuring of the Grecians. Thus the 
ministry become exempt from moneyed 
collections and moneyed contributions, 
and so the ministry became exempt from 
murmurings, suspicion and complaint of 
the poor in the church, as neglected by 
them. Then the office of a minister is, 
continually to wait on the ministry of the 
word; but the office of a deacon is, to dis- 
tribute the funds of the church to the poor 
of the church, and see they are not neg- 
lected. So then one plain duty of a dea- 
con's office is, to serve tables; not table, in 
the singular, but tables .in the plural as ma- 
ny. Now here is an important question, 
what is meant by tables in the text? Does 
it mean the various tables of the Hebrew 
and Grecian widows, that were poor and 
were fed from the contributions of other 
saints, distributed first by the apostles and 
afterwards by the seven deacons when or- 
dained to the office of a deacon by the 
apostles? Or does serve tables mean, the 
table of the poor, the table of the minister, 
and the table of the Lord? For these 
three would make the plural tables, as 
were the tables of the various widows to 
make a plural tables. We are inclined at 
present to the latter opinion as true, that 
the duty of a deacon is to attend ori the ta- 
ble of the Lord; secondly, to enquire and 
search out the poor of the church and 
know their circumstances, whether they 
are in want of daily food or clothing; if 
they find any such in the church, if they 
have funds of the church they should re- 
lieve them, or if not, they should make re- 
port to the church that such a brother or 
sister is in suffering circumstances, as the 
case may be, and had been neglected. 
This was the ground of complaint in the 
first instance, and the cause why deacons 
were chosen to their office in the first in- 
stance, that they might remedy this neg- 
lect by their appointment and attention to 
their office, in supplying the poor without 
neglect. Then to the poor of a church a 
deacon is bound strictly to attend As to 
the distribution of the Lord's supper de- 
volving on the deacons, we will not at pre- 



11 



sent be so certain, not having considered 
that subject as we should; yet we say, that 
the very words of Christ in the Erst ad- 
ministration of the Lord's supper, imply 
some such thing when he says, take, this 
and divide it among yourselves; eat you all 
of it; it must imply, he spake and handed 
it to some one of the twelve, or he need 
not have doubled the expression, take, and 
tlien the injunction, eat you all of it, Next 
we are not prepared to say that the table 
of the minister is certainly couched in the 
word tables, having not fully consulted 
the scriptures on this head, by reason of 
the hurry in which we have drawn up this 
Circular; but would refer our deacons to 
examine the scriptures on this head of their 
duty, of attending to the tables of their 
ministers, that they be well supplied with 
all good things, since the law of Christ is, 
Let him that is taught in the word com- 
municate to him that teaches in ail good 
things. Then if communications are to be 
made by the church to the ministers there- 
of, it is to first fall into the hands of the 
deacons, whom the church has chosen as 
honest men, of good report, and not cove- 
tous, to deal out all their funds as they in 
their judgment should think meet by the 
hands of this honest deacon they have 
chosen and ordained to office. And the 
propriety of this proceeding is plain; first, 
it greatly saves the feelings of the minis- 
ter, of hearing the subject of his support 
canvassed itr conference. Secondly, it 
keeps secret from him, who is liberal in 
the church towards him, and who is not. 
Thirdly, it prevents his suspicious of any 
member's love or regard for him and his 
preaching. Fourthly, it promotes his good 
will for all, not knowing from whom this 
bounty and sweet-smelling savour to God 
came, from Tom, Dick, or Harry. And 
fifthly, it fulfils the scripture, not let thy left 
hand know what thy right hand doeth. And 
sixthly, this bounty iays your minister un- 
der fresh and renewed obligations and dili- 
gence to serve the church, seeing they by 
their bounty have afresh given him a proof 
of their love and regard for him and his 
ministry; which is too much neglected by 
churches, and gives room for the suspi- 
cion of ministers, to believe neither they 
nor their preaching are not much wanted 
by the church. From which the back- 
wardness of ministers but too often pro- 



ceed, to the church's murmuring and com- 
plaint that their minister neglects I em. 

But although we have not fully (O .suit- 
ed the scriptures on this head, yet we are 
inclined to think that the table of the min- 
ister comes within the office of deacon, to 
see he is well supplied with good things, 
from several scripturesi First, the apos- 
tles had led all to follow Christ and the 
ministry; and the brethren that sold their 
possessions laid down the money at the a- 
posties' feet, that distribution should be 
made as every man had need. We should 
then say, the apostle that was in need sha- 
red with the poor widows, Sic. Again: 
thou shah not muzzle the ox that treadeth 
out the corn; this churches do when they 
give their ministers nothing, and this 
comes within the office of deacons to see to 
the secular concerns of the churches. A- 
gain: he that waiteth on the altar is parta- 
ker with the altar; which we expound, lie 
that waiteth on the church should be parta- 
ker of the church's bounty. Again: the 
laborer is worthy of his meat. Again: he 
that feedeth a flock should eat of the milk 
of the flock; likewise he that planieth a 
vineyard should eat of the fruit of the vine- 
yard, he. he. 

These and many more scriptures prove, 
that if deacons are appointed to attend to 
the moneyed concerns of- the church, all 
which are the laws of Jesus Christ, that to 
attend to the table or supply of a minister 
comes within the office of a deacon. Yet 
alas, how few if any deacons ever enquire 
or search out whether their minister is in 
want of food or clothing, or want of a horse 
to ride, or a chair through infirmity, or 
other necessities to enable them to serve 
them, or to preach the gospel to others; but 
are just as careless about those things as if 
they had never taken the office on them. 
It is not expected nor is it right, that dea- 
cons alone out of their bounty should 
serve tables at their own cost; but they are 
to search out and make these things known 
to the churches, and if the chnrches will 
not put funds in their hands to fulfil their 
office, then and not until then can the}' 
be exonerated from censure in hold- 
ing the office of deacons. For it is 
evident, that those that sold their posses- 
sions supplied the apostles with funds in 
the first instance, and that in like manner 
the seven deacons were supplied with funds 



from the churches for the poor, he. But 
now the churches put it all on the deacons 
at their own cost to supply the table of the 
Lord with bread and wine; this is wrong, 
a shame and disgrace to any church. You 
eat and drink from the private funds of a 
brother deacon^which should be from the 
funds of the church and not the deacon in- 
dividually, since all are partakers all 
should be payers. So in funds for the 
minister, all are partakers of the benefits 
of his ministry, all should be payers, as 
taught in the word, to him that teaches: 
so say the laws of Christ. We have, bro- 
ther deacons, abundance more to say on 
vour office 



12 

that we have passed from death unto Hfe, 
because we love the brethren. With hun- 
dreds of other texts show us, that the first 
great law of Jesus Christ to his church is, 
that all the members thereof should love 
one another with a pure heart fervently, 
and equal in extent as he has loved us. 
This is a heaven-bom principle, of all the 
children of God; and out of this principle 
there should be a doing in act. 1 John, 
3. 17: But whoso hath this world's good, 
and seeth his brother have need, and shut- 
teth up his bowels of compassion from 
him, how dwelleth the love of God in him? 






18. My Mule children, let us not love in 
but this much you must lake word, neither in tongue; but in deed and in 

The way to love is, to prove your 



merely to call your attention to your of- ! truth. 

fice, and hope you will study it from the I love by your acts, dear brethren; for as 

New Testament, the laws of Christ, and our Saviour said to his disc iples: Know 



act accordingly up to your office as dea- 
cons in the church of God according to 
his laws, knowing what the scripture saith: 



you all these things? yea, Lord — then 
adds, happy are ye if yon do them. He 
places the happiness in doing, and not in 



For they that have used the office of a dea- ; knowing, So do ye, brethren, place your 
con well, purchase to themselves a good love in good doing h not in a sweet tongue 



degree and great boldness in the faith 
which is in Christ Jesus, Can you use the 
effice ol a deacon well, when you do not 



and asound of fair words; for knowing and 
saying, be ye warmed and clothed, without 
giving the things needed, is building on 



do your own duly, nor exhort nor stir up the sand; but doing is as Christ has said* 



and lay before the church her duty. 

We now come to the laws of our God 
for the obedience of private members in 
the church of God, that hold neither of 
these offices. And the first law or com- 
mandment of Christ that we produce for 
all members of Christ's church is, John, 
15. 17: These things I command you, that 
ye love one another. 10 If ye keep my 
commandments. 12. This is my com- 
mandment, that ye love one another, as I 
have loved you. And the I3th verse 
shows the amount of this love: Greater 
love hath no man than this, that a man 
lay down his life for his friends. 1 Peter, 
1. 22: See that ye love one another with a 
pure heart fervently. I Peter,-2. 17: Love 
the brotherhood. 1 John, 3. 11: For this 
is the message that ye heard from the be- 
ginning, that we should love one another. 
1 John, 4. 7: Beloved, let us love one an- 
other: for love is of God; and every one 
that loveth is born of God, and knovveth 
God. 11. Beloved, if God so loved ns, 
we ought also to love one another 20. 
If a man say, 1 love God, and hateth his 
brother, he is a liar. 1 John, 5 3: For 
this is the love of God, that we keep his 
commandments. 1 John, 3. 14: We know 



founding on a rock 

The second great law of Christ is, Luke, 
6. 31: And as ye would that men should 
do to you, do ye also to them likewise. 
This law, brethren, is just and right be- 
tween brethren, and between man and man 
in all stages of life, sick or well, in pover- 
ty or riches, in prosperity or adversity; 
and we exhort you, brethren, to carry it 
out into practice in all your dealings with 
mankind, whether in church or stale; you 
will find it to your good in time and eter- 
nity. And to do this, you must shift as it 
were conditions with others. 

The third great law of Christ is, that of 
the support of his ministry in the world; 
or, by the foolishness of preaching he is 
pleased to save them that believe, and feed 
liis sheep and lambs, and to be a witness 
against the ungodly; who make a mock of 
preaching as mere foolishness, and think 
themselves above hearing the gospel of 
salvation as sent by God to them through 
the organ of the preacher, and often in the 
world's esteem a mere fool. So let it be, it 
is God's way to give faith unto salvation 
to those that believe his gospel by the 
preacher. Then we come to those laws 
of Christ for a preacher's support. First 3 



13 



as to the qtjalh y of the preacher's support. 
Galhlians, G. 6: Let him thai is taught in 
the word communicate unto him that tea- 
cheth in all good things. (Mark that word, 
all good tilings.) This we would say 
comprehends food and raiment for him 
sell, or a horse to ride, or other things thai 
might enable him to prosecute his minis- 
try to the church or others without impe- 
diment in his course of preaching; for 
these are good things to the minister, and 
a good tiling to the church, as their gilts 
in this way are a sweet smelling savour to 
God, and enables the minister more fully 
to serve the church and others, and frees 
his mind live more from worldly cares to 
attend to study and his ministry. 

Secondly, as to quantity of a minister's 
support. 2 Corinthians, 9 6; But this I 
say, he which soweth sparingly, shall reap 
also sparingly; and he which soweth boun- 
tifully, shall reap also bountifully. 7. E- 
very man according as he purposeth in his 
heart, so let him give; not grudgingly, or 
of necessity: for God loveth a cheerful 
giver. 5. That the same might be ready, 
as a matter of bounty, and not as of cove 
tousness. 10. Now he that ministereth 
seed to the sower, both minister bread for 
your food. 13. While by the experiment 
of this ministration they glorify God for 
your professed subjection unto the gospel 
of Christ, and for your liberal distribution 
unto them, and unto all men. The above 
texts show the quantity of a minister's sup- 
port, bountifully, liberally, ready, and not 
sparingly, and as every man purposes in his 
heart to give so let him give. If by law, then 
of course by restraint; if by begging and 
teasing for money or subscriptions, then of 
necessity; if pressed by persuasion, on the 
account of others being liberal, grudging- 
ly. All of which gifts to the poor or min- 
ister, is not a gospel gift to God, neither is 
accepted by him as such; for the gift he 
calls for from you, dear brethren, in the 
support of his ministers in the world, is 
bountifully, liberal, ready, and according 
to the purpose of your heart. If you give 
any thing more, constraint, necessity, and 
grudgingly, may be written on your gifts; 
and so not a free will bounty nor offering 
to God, according to his laws. But lake 
care of a grudgingly or sparing offering, for 
then you hear the law, reap also sparingly 
For the above reasons we are opposed 



to law religion and the begging societies of 
the day, with all the new schemes they 
have invented to make money for priests 
out of the church of God and world of 
mankind, by begging, persuasion, and 
subscriptions, as being contrary to the 
laws of Jesus Christ for his church on 
earth. And although they may boast of 
iheir millions collected from the church 
and people, yet all this has not been done 
as the laws of Christ require; for every 
man that labors has a right to hold his own 
pnrse strings, and do with his money as he 
pleases as the fruit of his labor. Yet 
when you force it from him by law for 
priests against his will, it is tyranny; when 
begged and teased by running beggars, 
until his honor as a gentleman and well 
wisher to religious society is insulted, he 
gives the amount wished by the heggar to 
get clear of him and save his honorable 
feelings, then this gift is of necessity; and 
when pressed by the beggar out of all 
countenance, then he gives grudgingly. 
Such gifts to God have no reward, and are 
not according to the laws quoted above. 
A thousand things more might be said on 
this head of a minister's quantity ol sup- 
port, but knowing we have already excee- 
ded our usual limits, we must refer you to 
the New Testament for further information 
on the third head, which we hope you will 
do and act accordingly, in quantity of the 
support of the man that teaches yon; this 
do, and not say you will do, and not do. 

Knowing our limits are more than run 
out already, we must throw together some 
other laws of Christ on doing your duty, 
in miniature; as members of the church of 
Christ, and not as officers. The first great 
duty is, to love one another; the second, to 
do unto all men as ye would they should 
do unto you; the third, to support God's 
ministers in the world freely, liberally, and 
bountifully, as your purpose of heart may 
be to give to the poor, or ihem; fourth, let 
brotherly love continue, esteem God's min- 
ister's highly for their work sake. But to 
do good and to communicate forget not, 
for with such sacrifice God is well pleased. 
Obey them that have the rule over you^ 
salute them that have the rule over you 
and all saints. Remember them which 
have the rule over you, who have spoken 
unto you the word of God, whose fait; fol- 
low. Let vour conversation be without 



14 



covetousness, and be content with such 
things as you have. Be not carried about 
with divers and strange doctrines. As we 
have therefore opportunity, let us do good 
unto all men, especially unto the household 
of faith. Let us not be weary in well do- 
ing, for in due season we shall reap if we 
faint not. Bear ye one another's burdens, 
and so fulfil the law of Christ. Children, 
obev your parents, honor thy father and 
mother. And ye fathers, provoke not 
your children to wrath. Servants, be obe- 
dient to them that are your masters. Mas- 
ters, give to your servants that which is 
just and equal. Be ye angry and sin not. 
Let no corrupt communication proceed 
out of your mouth. Put away all lying. 
Grieve not the Holy Spirit. Let all bit- 
terness, and wrath, and anger, and clamor, 
and evil speaking be put away from you, 
wiih all malice; and be ye Kind one to an- 
other, tender-hearted,. forgiving one anoth- 
er, even as God for Christ's sake hath for- 
given you. Have no fellowship with the 
unfruitful works of darkness, but rather re- 
prove them. And be ye renewed in the 
spirit of your mind, neither filthiness nor 
foolish talking nor jesting, but rather giv- 
ing of thanks. Husbands love your wives, 
even as Christ also loved the church and 
ggrve himself for it. Wives submit your- 
selves unto your own husbands, as unto 
the Lord; and there is not a command of 
Jesus in the whole New Testament more 
disobeyed than this last, of wives submis- 
sion to husbands. Therefore, as the church 
is subject unto Christ, so let the wives be 
to their own husbands in every thing. .Ah, 
that's the bite; submission in every thing 
to a husband will not do for a wife. So 
also submission in every thing to Christ's 
laws will not do for missionary churches. 
For the husband is the head of the,, wife — 
ah, that she cannot bear but must have her 
way in things as does her husband. So 
with missionary churches, they must have 
their way, whether it agrees with Christ's 
law or not, as her claimed husband. Let 
your moderation be known to all men. Be 
careful for nothing; but in every thing by 
prayer and supplication with thanksgiving 
let your requests be made known to God. 
Rejoice in the Lord alway; and again I 
say, rejoice. Beware lest any man spoil 
you through vain philosophy and deceit, 
after the tradition of men, after the rudi- 
ments of the world, and not after Christ. 
That no man go beyond and defraud his 
brother in any matter. Pray without cea- 



sing, in every thing give thanks. Quench 
not the spirit, despise not prophecy ing. 
Prove all things, hold fast to that which is 
good. Abstain from ail appearance of evil. 

Rebuke not an Elder, but entrean him 
as a lather, and the younger men as bieth- 
ven; the elder women as mother*, younger 
as sistei-, with ali purity. H6n-or wi- 
dows, that are widows indeed; them that 
sin rebuke before all, that others also may 
i\idi\ Let as many servants as are under 
the y die count their owe masters worthy 
of all honor, that the name of God and his 
doctrine be not blasphemed. Obey them 
that have the rule over you. Likewise, 
ye younger, submit yourselves to the. el- 
der; yea, all of you be subject one to anoth- 
er. Finally, brethren, whatsoever things 
are true, whatsoever things are honest, 
whatsoever things are just, whatsoever 
things are pure, whatsover things are love- 
ly, whatsoever things are of good report, 
if there be any virtue, and if there b^ any 
praise, think on these things. The above 
is a mere sketch of the laws, command- 
ments or rules, for the members of the 
chureh of Jesus Christ to observe in their 
daily and constant conduct, with hundreds 
of others of like import. Is there a man on 
earth that can say, these are not good rules 
of life? We trow not. But this we la- 
rneni,that men can say, members of the 
churches do not observe them in their 
practical conduct, nor walk according to 
those o! J<-sus Christ. WVH, the penalty 
of tho-e laws is to be suffered by the diso- 
bedient saint, a sketch of which we intend 
to give. 

The first then we shall notice is, Christ's 
penal laws for his churches; disobedience 
to his laws. Revelations, 2. 4: Never- 
theless, 1 have somewhat against thee, be- 
cause thou hast left thy first love. 5: Re- 
member, therefore, from whence thou art 
fallen; and repent and do the first works, or 
1 will come unto thee quickly; and will re- 
move thy candlestick, (the church at Epe- 
sus is meant by candlestick,) out of his 
place, except thou repenti The meaning 
of which verses is, when a church fails to 
do her duty, this is the penalty; the wast- 
ing away and breaking up of her church 
state. And alas, at this time how many 
churches seem coming to nettling; and 
have almost broke up as a church, holding 
no conference, using no discipline, and no 
meeting together. Many churches seenf 
on the very eve of being removed out of 



15 



their place, where they once gave light to 
all the neighborhood around. Search for 
the cause, and you will Hud it lobe the 
same as that of the church at Ephesus; in 
all thoseehiircheslh.it left their first love 
and works, this penalty will be indicted 
without repentance, reformation, and doing 
first love and works. And to the church 
at Pergamus, 14th verse: But I have a 
few things against thee, because thou has* 
there them that hold the doctrine of Ba- 
laam. Mere Christ lodges a charge against 
this church; for having them that eat things 
sacrificed to idols, and commit fornication; 
and thern that held the doctrine of the 
Nicolatines, or such as contended for the 
doctrines of Nicholas, which doctrine was 
a plurality of wives, or polygamy; which 
doctrine was hateful to Christ 16th verse: 
Repent, or else I will come unto thee 
quickly, and will fight against thee with 
the sword of my mouth. Then churches 
are accountable for holding members in 
her that hold to. and publish false doc- 
trines, and will be punished for so doing; 
this must do for a sketch. Head the char- 
ges against the other churches, and the 
threatened penalties for their bad conduct. 
Then all churches are accountable in their 
collective capacity to Christ, their law giv- 
er and head, and he will punish them for 
disobedience to his laws. 

We now add a few penalties for disobe- 
dient ministers. Luke, 12. 42: And ihe 
Lord said, Who then is that faithful and 
wise steward whom his Lord has made 
ruler over his household, to give them 
their portion of meat in due season? But 
if he fails so to do, and says; my Lord 
delayeth his coming, and beats the men 
and maid servants, and be drunken; 46: 
The Lord of that servant, (ministers are 
meant,) will come in a day wh^n he look- 
eth not for him, and at an hour when he is 
not aware, and will cut him in sunder and 
will appoint him his portion with the un- 
believers. And that servant, (minister) 
which knew his Lord's will and prepared 
not himself, neither did according to his 
will, shall be beaten with many stripes. 
Hear, ministers, and obey, to feed the 
church of God to which you have been 



called, that you may escape the penalty Amen. 



threatened by Christ your master. A 
minister that does not obey the laws of 
t-hrist and loses his good character, is as 
salt that has lost its savour, fit fp_r noth- 
ing but to be cast out of the church upon 
'he dung hill of this world, and be trodden 
under foot by men. Beware, remember 
Lot's wife* he that putteth his hand to the 
plough and looketh back, is not fit for a 
gospel ministi r. Neither that man that 
does not bring his body under subjection, 
he is only fit to be a cast away in the esti- 
mation of the church, his brethren, and 
wo*' Id, and sink lower in character than 
any other man, and be a foot ball for men 
afiddevils; and will be a sturobling block, 
and an object of mockery for the u god- 
ly. To the scriptures we refer you for 
further particulars. 

Lastly, to private members, and dea- 
cons, and ministers, or whole church, for 
not keeping Christ's laws. First penalty, 
rebuke, reproof, admonition, exhortation, 
church censure, calling to an account, 
dealing with and excommunication, and 
bring to the church no more than an hea- 
then man or publican; chastisement by 
Christ, if a child, in that way he may 
think best that such an one may be par- 
taker of his holiness; if a bastard, or hypo- 
crite, he lets them go out of the church 
and to hell without the rod. But in the 
execution of all his laws, by his church 
and ministers, he is mild and pitiful to- 
wards his children; if they sin seventy 
times in a clay, and turn again and sa} 7 , I 
repent, his children are to forgive; or if 
any man be overtaken in a fault, such as 
are spiritual, are to^restore this faulty child 
lo the spirit of meekness, considering his 
liability to temptation and fall himself. — 
The law of Jesus Christ on forgiveness, is 
one among his great laws to be obeyed 
under penalty. Matthew, \b. 34: And 
his Lord was wroth, and delivered him to 
the tormentors, (the world, flesh, and the 
devil,) till he should pay all that was due 
unto him. 35: So likewise shall my 
heavenly Father do also unto you, if ye 
from your hearts forgive not every one 
his brother their trespasses. Read the 
chapter. 

The grace of God be with you all. — - 



Tar horo' Press. 



& 



i" 



TnTl?* 



OF THE 



'iehukee Baptist Association, 



HELD AT 



BETHEL MEETINGS HOUSE, 



Beaufort Comity , JVorth Carolina* 



Commencing Saturday before the first Sunday in October, 1839, 



OCTOBER 5th, 1S39. 

1. The introductory Sermon was deliv- 
ered by Elder William Hyman, (agreea- 
bly to appointment,) from Revelations, xxi. 
chap, latter clause of the 9fh verse: "Come 
hither, I will show thee the bride, the 
Lamb's wife." 

2. The delegates from the churches then 
assembled, the Association whs open- 
ed with prayer by Elder Joseph Biggs, 
when Elder William Hyman was chosen 
Moderator, and Elder Joseph Biggs, 
clerk, who called to his assistance brethren 
R. M. G. Moore, and Stephen Outterbi i<!ge. 

3. Brethren in the ministry, (present,) 
from sister Associations, were invited to 
seats, when Elders Stadler, Smith, 
Wilder, and Adams, seated themselves. 

4. Letters from thirty churches were 
read, and the names of the delegates enrol- 
led, and the representation stated in the 
table of churches. 



5. Petitionary letters for membership iri 
this Association were called for, when one 
from Fishing Creek, (Daniel's m. h.) Hal- 
ifax county, was handed in by their mes- 
senger, John N. Hunter, and read, and she 
was received, and manifested by the Mod- 
erator giving the messenger the right hand 
of fellowship. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister 
Associations were called for, when one 
from the White Oak Association was hand- 
ded in by their messenger, Elder Josiah 
Smith, with a file of 35 copies of their 
Minutes; also, received from the Country 
Line Association, 20 copies of their Min- 
utes; also, from the Abbott's Creek Union 
x\ssociation, 40 copies of their Minutes; 
also, 40 copies of the Minutes of the 
Contentnea Association; also, 40 copies 
from the Little River Association; also 35 
copies from the Abbott's Creek Union As- 
sociation for the year 1837. 



r ;■■>- ps r ^hurdles and 








ft co 




<>.- r > v i.tre 


PASTORS AND MESSENGERS, a- 


# 


kt 


| 






i * 


-ittlutert. 


* 


§: 


! J5- g 


P- 


p. 




Li_ 




i 


r*" 


I £ 


_ 






|S Ct8 


J flc sr .r-iss,.1/,//</; ,o I iiiy. 


VVM. V HITAKKP, .lames Harrison, 








1 




2 


29 


I 75 


2 HI unfs Cr'lv, ftea f» (,- 


Robert Tripp, Lodowick Redditt, 














30 


1 l 50f 


3 Cowenjot;k. Cur r,. tuck , -\ 


■ 












60 


1 


4 Oono4i<>, Martin, — 


BIX UNT COOPER, Nathan F. Hooker, 2 


2 






i 




44 


I l 


5 Oonetoe, Edgewmbe, 


»OHN H. DAMKL, Richard E. Rieves, 




1 2 




36 


I 50 


6 Concord, Washings on. 


VI K , A.l A H A M BROS !<',,* Max'm Tatum, 




! 


2 I 


28 


1 


7 Cross Roads, Edgecombe. 


VVM. IS Y MAN, Sovereign Purvis, 






i 




3 


33 


1 


8 Cedar Island, Carteret,— 


Thomas Rohason, John Lump tain, 






3 




1 




31 


1 50 


9 D^ep ('reek, Ho I fax, — -j 
















23 




10 Falls Tar River. Nash,- 


Joseph S. Battle,* Tames S. Battle,* 










2 


6$ 


2 


11 Flat Swamp, Pitt, — 


VdUam W. K. Phllpot, Irvin Page, 




2 


2 


I 


2 


54 


1 


12 Flatty Creek, Pisqutfk,- 
















12 




13 Frying Pali, Tyrrell,—* 
















18 




14 Fishing ("reek, flat fax, - 


John N. Hunter, 
















i 


15 Great Swamp, A//, — 


'lardy V\ hichard, John S. Brown, 






1 


1 £ 


61 


1 1 


16 Goose ('reek, Bum fort,— 


Zacharias Linton,* Henry Carrow, 














11 


1 1 


17 Kehukee, Halifax,—^ 
















132 


1 


18 Lawrence's in. 1). Edgele. 


JOSHUA LAWRENCE,* R'd Harrison, 














66 


1 1 60 


19 Little Alii gator, 7^rre//,--f 
















6 


1 


20 Morattoe'k, IVashhigfon,- 


William Gray, Wilson W. Misle, 




3 




I 




v 82 


1 1 50 


21 North Creek, Bwfart,- 


Henry Blount, Noah Gaskill, 




1 


2 






1 


38 


1 l 50 


22 Old Ford, Bt m fort, — 


John Hodges, David Singleton, 






1 








8 


I 25 


23 Pieot m. h. Martin, — 


Joshua Rohason,* John G. Smithwick, 










3 




28 


1 l 


24 Powel's P( int, (Jurri'k,- 


James Melson,* Jacob lieasley,* 


22 


10 












1 2 


25 Pnngo, Beaufort, — 


Richard D: t vis, John R. Davis,* 




1 


1 


2 




1 


14 


i ! 


26 Rocky Swamp, //a/, \r,-j 
















55 


3 


27 Sappony, Ntuh. — 


A. Bi Baines,* 








1 


3 




56 


I l 


2S Scuppernoncr. Tyr-ell,— j 
















17 


1 


29 So. Mattamuskeet, Hydt, 


GEO. W. CARPO\TAN,Th Bridgman, 














71 


2 


30 Sandy (iiWe* iV?«A, — 


1 sane Strieklin. 














• 


1 


31 Skewarkey, Martin* 


JONFPH BIGGS, JOHN WARD, 


1 




2 3 


2 




58 


1 50 


32 South Qu'y. v " ''". P? i- 


KHV\ IN HARRISON.Jos.L.Lawrenee,* 














71 


1 2 


33 Smithwick's (>'k,.Va'«,- 


li U M MIR' V !ST A L LI N GS, B Leogitt,* 


1 












21 1| 50 


34 Sound Side. Tyrrell, — 


Renders' n S. Sutton, 










?, 




3?i| 50 


35 Spring Green. Martin, — 


J< hn Griffin. Stephen Outterbridge, 




1 


1 


} 




37 i 1 


36 TarHnrough, Edge, ombe,- 


Ceffield King,* 






1 




44 I 1 


37 Washington, $eavfa /, - 


Taeoh Swindell, -Daniel Wilkinson, 




1 


1 1 1 




37 I 1 50 


38 YMii'e Plains, Beauforw,- 


Jonathan Wallace, Levin Osburn, 


2 












27 ! | 1 10 


39 Williams's on h> Edg\,- 


David Bradley,* 




2 






J 




— 1— - 




Total, 


28 


2: 


18132? 


5 


1498 536 00 



NOTE. Pastors of Churches and r>ther ordained Ministers are in CAPITALS; unordained 
Ministers ; itt italic; those marked thus* were not present; from churches marked thus f we received 
no intelligence, in that case their number stands as last represented; dashes — denote no pastors; the 
last column shows the contributions from the churches this year to the Association fund. 



7 The following con nittees vv re ap- 
pointed, (vizi) brethren Stephen Outier- 
bridge, and Richard E. h'ieves on finance; 
Elder John II Daniel to write «o the Con 
tentnea Association; bro. fVrn. IV. K Phil 
pot to the Wh'te Oak A-s >< i rti.bir; to the 
Lit lo River Ass »ciation, Stephen Ou'tcr- 
bridge;and Ric'^od Harbison to the Coun- 
try Lme Assjeiation; and Elders Stabler, 
Wilder, and Adam , to ex;iniir»e fh^ 
Circular Letter; brethren Biggs and Car- 
Xowan Id exa nine * letter from a private 
individual to th's Association j all to report 
«■ Monday next 



S. The fd'ow ng brethren were reques- 
ted, (by private ballot,) to occupy the stage 
on the morrow, by preaching, and divine 
worship to comn.ence a' 10 o'clock, A. 
M., Elders Stabler, Wilder, and Ad- 
ams. 

The Association then adjourned with 
prayer hv the Moderator, until Monday 
I next, 9 o'clock, A. M. 

SUNDAY, October 6tb. 
! The brethren appointed to the stage 
preached. Elder Wilder from Solomon's 
I Songs s iii, chapter and 3d versei The 



watchmen that go about the city found 
me, to whom I said, saw yc him w'uw 
my soul loveth." Ehler Si nil r preach- 
ed from Psalms, Ixv 4: "Bles e I is ill 
man wh 'in than choo-esl and cans si i< 
approach unto th3", that lie may d«ell 
in thy co nt>: we shall be satisfied wit-h 
the goo Ines- of thy house^ even of ihy ho 
ly temple. The worship w a- closed with 
prayer by Eld r William Myman. We 
hope from the faithfulness of the preachers, 
a^d the attention of the people, that good 
will result therefrom; 

MONDAY, October 7th. 

The Association asserribltng, and being 
opened wi h pray-r bv Elder John II 
Daniel, proceeded to business. 

9. The committees appointed on Satur-| 
dav, were mailed on to report: when E der I 
Stadlkr. from the eomrninee to examine] 
the Circvd r 1. t'e>, (that Elder Josepu j 
Riggs had pn par -d.) reported, iK »t il ev j 
had ('one so, am! a pf rived of it. a»id advi- ; 
serl that the sane be no-v real in the As- 
sociation: the same done and appro V< d« 
and ordered the same to be attached to I 
th^se M#|iutps. Brother Mamson, thai 
was appointed to w rite to 'he Country Line 
Association, handed in a letter, wi i h \a^ 
rend and approved, and signed by the. 
Moderator and Clerk, and Eiders Wm, ; 
Hfman, John H. Daniel, an I brother; 
Richard Itfcarrison were appointed to he r I 
the same, with 25 copies of our Minutes, j 
Brother PJiilpot, that was appoin'ed to 
write to the White Oak Association,handed i 
in one, which was read and approved, ami 
signed by the Moderator ami Clerk, and 
brother Richard fl Bieven appoin'ed ta 
bear the same, with 25 copies of our Min- 
utes. Elder John II. Daniel, that was 
appointed to wrbe to the Content nea As 
soc ; ation, handed in one which was read 
and approved, an I s ; g ,e I by the Modera- 
tor a Mil CI rk, and Elders John Ward. 
Humphrey Stallings, William Hy- 
man, and William Whitaker, weie 
appointed to bear the same, with 25 copies 
of our Minutes, Brother Stephen Ontter- 
bridge that was appointed to write to Little 
River Association, failing on the account 
of sickness, brethren John H. Dame: and 
Richard Harrison were appointed delegates 
to said Association, arid they are permitted 
to prepare a le:ter of correspondence to 
said Association, under the signature of 
the Moderator and Clerk, and that they 
convey 25 copies of our Minutes io them. 



10. Resolved, that our nert Associatto* 
He holden with 'he church of South Quay, 
Sou hampton county, Va. to commence on 
-vaturcl y baf r then s Sunday in October, 
1840, and thai EiderJonN II. Daniel be 
rjq :c>*ed to delivi r a Pennon i itroduC ory 
to business, and thatdivme worship com- 
mence at I 1 o'clock, A. M.: and in case 
of his failure, Elder Joseph Biggs 

1 1 Res dved, th >\ Elder Blount Coop- 
er, her q-j< sted to prepare -a Circular Let- 
ter for th it Association. 

1 3 Elder Biggs, from the committee to 
px-»mine the letter handed in on Saturday, 
from Rn individual, reported that he 
thoncrht it unnecessary for* it to be read in 
this bo<h\: the same concur* red in. 

IS. R * Ave I, rh »t we correspond «ith 
the Ahbottt's Creek Union Meeting Asso- 
rfatidu hv Minu'es, hy st'n 'ing them a file 
oi niir M mutes. 



14 A 
Lttks VV A 



0|og.-i| 



fhieal s'-etch of Elder 



a il 



de<ea e 1, was ban-led in 
rei t. ail ivr le'red tha - tire same b" in- 



sereo m 

\5. Bo 
on the com 



lese 



I <. 



er William Gray is appointed 
ittee of fiii.inc , in the room «»f 



brother Stephen -t r >r»dj™\ that U-i-k. 
1 h* Re-o ! ve r 'hii we a Ijoorn for 30 
m 'mantes, in which time 'h committee 
of fin nice is ti -if. i th • return of the 
Association, th ■ committee o 1 * finance re- 
ported — 

That they find the hands of the Treasurer at the 
Hose of last Association, Hie sum of $75 96 

Paid for printing 1 the Minutes of 

la^t year the sum of $10 00 

Paid the Clerk's expenses, 15 00 

55 00 



Leaving a balance in the Treasurer's hands, $20 96 
Received ia contrihutions from the church- 
es at tills Association the sum of 38 20 

A balance n«,\v in hand $59 16 
The Association concurred with the re- 
port. 

17. Elder Joseph B?ggs is reques'ed t 
prep ire these Minutes for the pr ss,surr 
intend the printing of 800 copies thr' ' 
and distribute them as usual. l 

IS. It is resolved, that the ehu' •_ 
requested m their letters io re* . . lie ,-t 

tiori, to sta'e the time of their \ •. .^ 
4.t * 4 , . «,ated in the 

mgs, that the same may he 

Minnt;Sof this Assoeia'i'".. t .«,u 

•r a • .. 4 , itdiuirnfd wjtn 

I he Assoei ition was tl; •' , .. ,.•■__ 

, T7- t r xhGGs, to tne time 

prayer by Eider Jossp/ XJiU ' 

aid r>lace appointed.. a . .. .. ,. . n „ 
WILLIAM i^MAN, Moderator. 



JQSEPr-riB GGS ' Glei '^ 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 

The ministers and messengers of I he. sev- 
eral churches, that compose the Kehu- 
Jcee Baptist Jlssocia t ion, to the church- 
es they represent, Greeting: 
Being now convened at the Bethel meet- 
ing house, with the church of Pungo, in 
Beaufort county, North Carolina, send our 
yearly congratulations; a practice by us 
adopted ever since the year 1790, now 
nearly fifty years. And as they have been 
generally received by you with pleasure 
ana 1 delight, we therefore venture again to 
address vou with our Minutes, adding this 
epis'le of love thereto, taken at our session 
pn the 5ih, 6th, and 7th days of October, 
1839. 

Beloved brethren and sisters, we will try 
to give you a srnal! glance of the many great 
blessings, that our God and yours has hies 
sed us to participate of. And first, for the 
great scheme for the redemption of man 
laid in infinite wisdom in eternity, before 
time, for the salvation of sinful man, that 
he foresaw would sin; and for its accomp- 
lishment, in time, in the person of his dear 
Son, who engaged to become sin for his 
people, or suffer for them, to satisfy divine 
justice in their room and stead; whereby a 
way might be opened for (heir 1 escape from 
destruction. And secondly, for the addi- 
tional work of the Spirit, upon the dead 
faculties of their hearts, in bringing them 
to the knowledge of the truth as it is in 
Jesus, with its quickening influence; find 
giving them a well-grounded hope, and to 
feel an interest in that divine plan of salva- 
tion laid, and the teachings, and leading** 
of his spirit all our journey through this 
dreary wilderness where we now live up 
to this time, and the comfortable hope of 
his divine promise for its continual assis 
tancedown to the stoop of death, and tri- 
viimph'o'er the grave. 

We hear an old sunt say, 'fMahy are 

the righteous, vet the 

II." What 



■j\afflic lions of 



\deli vereth h i m out o f l h era a 
a °"r\ 
vv ^ n b)lessing it was bestowed on us, that 

intere?tV vere brought to hope ue had an 
loiA ■ " WHhat glori mis plan of salvation 

to be settle^ we , i h , g T" f' 

tiontimtthet' lg, n: n i e<o ; i i t ' ,n ' a ; 

»g ! .in Sl;a nd^f 0,1 f llslaino ' prevavl 
esco m ; un , C: , !e N r' t .™' :ld.vmepro m . S - 
iri»' n ~ r x • Rowing from this tree or 
nvmg fountain of k *r *. u i . 

t;™ Q ♦ i n ^ that have served at 

times to keep us frori • i • ^ 

un ^mking in despair. 

see the time come. 



And as we haveliyed\ 



that we in the good Book are adverti- 
sed of, that some would not endure sound 
doctrine, but would heap to themselves 
teachers having itching ears, that more of 
us have not been led away in wrong paths 
from the good way, by those false teachers, 
to bringing a reproach on the cause and inr 
terest of the Redeemer; by prevailing on 
us to take up with the false notions, and 
erroneous doctrines of the day. When 
we remember how near, (in some unguar? 
ded moments,) we have been ready to be 
halting between two opinions, when see- 
ing errors dressed up in a gaudy dress, un- 
til it h ith pleased a divine power for us to 
s^-e the beauties of the gospel to salute the 
eyes of our spiritual mind, and open our 
ears to hear divine instruction say: 
( 'S!and you in the ways, and see, and ask 
for the old paths, the good way, and walk 
! therein, and ye shall find rest your sou!s.' ? 
These things, brethren and sisters, some 
I of you can well remember when looking 
' back only five, ten, fifteen, or twenty years, 
I when God's dear children had not then 
I learned so much of the language of the 
j children of Ashdod and Amnion, flowing 
from the great fountain of Arminianism, or 
natural religion; while some were crying 
up the doctrine of general atonement and 
special application, and others saying, give 
us money, ah, money enough, and we will 
soon christianize the world in a short time. 
Now we think, dear brethren $nd sisters, 
as such doctrine is so pleasing to nature, if 
it had not h ave been for grace divine, soon 
we should have been caught while nibbling 
at this bait. 

Another great blessing that hath fallen 
to our lot is, that we had no larger a num- 
ber that used to form our Association carr 
ried away into error in the great split in 
the Baptist Associations and churches; and 
that so many are yet standing on the old 
orthodox platform of the gospel of Christ; 
(only two churches divided, and two whose 
names have lost their place from the list of 
churches that compose this Association.) 
While we hear that our sister Associations 
and chusches, that have been split else- 
where, have been so greut, what a great 
blessing it is, thai we have t}een no more 
singed thin we have been, and thus highly 
favored of God. 

Brethren, Gideon's r 5 rmy was once toq 
large, and had to be reduced; so with the 
churches in this and other Associations. 
And yet we think there are some in the 
outer church yet, on whose account we 



I 



hope the Lord will take his fan in his 
hand, and thoroughly purge his floor, and 
collect and keep his wheat in the garner, 
(church,) and blow the chaff away; and 
when the chaff in the churches is blown 
put, then may we expect a revival in them 
again. We find additional consolation in 
discovering some of the churches in 
the hounds of our former sister Associa- 
tions, that we dismissed from us some 
years past for their convenience, some of 
them being grieved at rinding those Asso- 
ciations embracing and following the fash- 
ions and doctrines of the day, until they 
have had to withdraw from them, and com- 
ing back, (prodigal-like,) to us again. 
Such as the old ancient churches at Cow- 
enjock, Powell's Point, Flatty Creek, and 
South Quay. In some of them (of late) it 
seems that the Lord has been with them, 
and caused a happy revival of religion to 
be felt. Truth and sound gospel doctrine 
is mighty, and in God's due time will pre- 
vail. May God hasten its accomplishment. 
What a great blessing we are now enjoy- 
ing, of meeting together in our Associa- 
tions and churches, in peace and love, and 
parting like brethren indeed, under the 
influence of Christian love and sweet fel- 
lowship. V\ hat a great blessing it is, that 



we were the third Baptist Association that 
was established in the United States — 'he 
first was the Philadelphia, in Pennsylvania} 
the second, Charleston, in South Carolina, 
and ours, the third—and finding that the 
first and second haye been led astray with 
cunningly devised fables, and from this 
body have been several more, that have 
followed in the wake of those that have run 
into error, and that the old Kekukee Asso? 
ciation is nearly left alone on the old gosr 
pel platform of faith and practice, what ad- 
ditional grounds have we to rejoice in God 
qur sure foundation, for his kind provi- 
dence to usward. And as we were the 
first that, publicly proclaimed against the 
prevailing errors of the day, (in the State 
of North Carolina,) that the Baptist chur- 
ches and ministers were getting into, and 
that our kind God has caused since such 
alterations to take place, and has blessed so 
many with ©yes to see the error they were 
getting into, and enabled them to return to 
the truth and proper order and disci- 
pline, and reprieve their characters, and 
strengthen the armsofourZion, may we not 
say with David: that men would praise 
the Lord for his goodness, and his wonder- 
ful works to the children of men.'* 

Then as it respects the ground that our 



we are enabled to realize the saying of that ! God has enabled us to take, let us adopt 
great man of God of old: "How good | the language of an American hero, (literal? 
and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell j ly,) "don't give up the ship;" not that of 
together in unity." Some of ihe churches ! State only, but that of the church of Christ, 
ih at have had such hard struggles to get ; 'he ground &pillarof the truth; for we know, 
along, have been crying to the Lord for ! thaU he gates qf hell can neverprevailagainst 
help, and the Lord (we think) has heard it. But, brethren and sisiers, as there was 
their cries, and come to their relief, and an Achan in the camps of Israel of old, let 
they are realizing a happy revival of reli- ' us search and see it there are not some 
gion, and by his divine spirit added new amongst us calculated to mar our peace 
converts thereto. Oh, what good news and happiness; and ask God for help to asr 
for publication and realization. j gist us and instruct us how to get clear of 

Now, brethren and sisters, what great them, that our Israel might prosper and 
pbligations do we lav under to God for prevail against our enemies. Your stations 
these blessings that we enjoy, for the ines- .as Old School Baptist churches are respon- 
timable favors vouchsafed to us through sible ones, see that ye discharge them 
our great Redeemer, and successful advo- faithfully and truly, for Zion's interest and 
rate with the Father of mercies and hies- God's glory, and for which you have to 
sino's. Does it not become us on our part, render an account to your God. 



to honor, reverence, and adore the n; 



And now, dear brethren and sisters, we 



of our God for these favors, and exert our- commit you to God and the word of his 

selves to promote his cause and interest grace. Search the scriptures as the man 

here below, and act worthy of the voca- of your council, by which you are to be 

tion wherewith we are called, and live in guided, and follow its directions and then 

peace with all men, and doing good to all, you will travel right and not do amiss, 

especially to the household of faith. Use the pruning knife of church discipline 

And when we attempt to recapitulate in your churches, that the dead limbs and 

the great favors and blessings that we have useless ones may be taken away, that the 
been indulged with, taking into view thatj others may thrive and grow, as calves of 



the stall. Do your duty to your preach- 
ers that you hope your God h-s, or may 
send you, and aid ihem to help you. Al- 
ways have your eve on the gospel mirror, 
to know how lo act aright, and to he gui- 
ded hy unerring wisdom, lo the glory of 
God and the advancement of his kingdom. 
And niav he grant yon grace to take this 
advice, for Christ's sake. Amen. 



A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF 

ELDER LU&H WAKD. 

lie was horn on she fifth day of Jan- 
uary, 1770, in Martin county, North 
Carolina, near Willian.ston. In his youth 
he received hut a limited education; A- 
bout IS or 19 years of ;sge he experienced 
a work of grace and a mnnife*ta'ion of the 
forgiveness of his sins through the atoning 
blood of Christ; on which theme he oiien 
dwell in preaching and in private conversa- 
tion through life. In the year 1799, he was 
ordained a minister of the g >spel. by El- 
ders Joseph Biggs and Amariah Biggs. 
Having for some time exercised his gifts 
in the church at Skew;»rkey, about the 
vear 1S06, took a letter of dismission from 



brethren. Not long after, he took another 
letter, which he held until March, 1838, 
when he offered for membership at Cross 
Roads meeting hou*e, Edgecombe county, 
was cordially received, and continued his 
membership there until his death. 

Elder Ward, it is certain, was not per- 
fection; he had human nature 1o contend 
with, as well as other, men; but we can 
bete say, that he had as few failings as any 
man. and lived and died with an unim- 
peachable character. He was married 
three times, he left a widow, and three sons 
(by his fi>st wife) all grown. As a gospel 
preacher he was surpassed by but few; he 
wss very orthodox, generally preaching 
short sermons. He had nothing to do, 
and hut little to say, with regard to the 
new schemes of the day; though he took 
a decided stand against them, believing 
them to be the inventions of men. He 
was very engaging in his preaching, 
and seldom preached without shedding 
tears. His whole theme was to preach 
Christ, a whole Saviour for sinners, 
without works, or merit in them. He 
was affected with the asthma, for several 
years before his death; for about two years 
he had to suspend preaching, and his com- 



the church at Skewarkey and joined the! plaint worried him greatly, though he bore 

church at Flat ^wamp, near which he lived i t w i t h great fortitude and resignation to 
at that time. He took the pastoral care of; tne will of God, as becomes God's ehil- 
said church, and continued to attend her jdren; expressing at times that it would be 
regular until about the year 1S35. During f ar better for him to depart, and be with 
this time his labors were incessant, in .Christ. His sufferings towards the last 
the adjoining churches, and he near-| were extreme, and on the 3rd of March, 
ly constantly attended the Associations, j 1S 39, in the evening he fell asleep, in the 



In this year he took a letter of dismis- 
sion from Flat Swamp church, (having 
married and moved into Edgecombe coun- 
ty,) as the distance was too far for him to 
ride, as he was beginning to be very in- 
firm. He did not join ;my church for 
some months, ?\nd returned his letter 
through the .strong solicitations of his 



full assurance of a blessed immortality. 

Blessed are the dead that die in the 
Lord; yea, saith the Spirit, they rest from 
their labors, and their works follow them. 

His funeral was preached by Elders Wil- 
liam Hyman and Blount Cooper, to an af- 
fected congregation. 

Tarhuro* Prest. 







MINUTES 



OF THE 



Kehukee Baptist Association^ 



HELD AT 



SOliTH QtAY ittJETlNfe HOUSE, 



Southampton county ', Virginia, 



Commencing on Saturday before the first Sunday in October, 1S40; 



SATURDAY, 3rd October, 1840. 

1. The Introductory Sermon (according 
to appointment) was delivered by Elder 
John H. Daniel, from 16 chap, of Mark, 
and 15th and 16th verses: "And he said 
unto them, Go ye into all the world, and 
preach the gospel to every creature; he 
that believeth and is baptised shall be sa- 
ved: but he that believeth not shall be 
damned.- 1 ' 

2. The delegates from the several chur- 
ches then assembled, and the Association 
was opened with prayer by Elder Wil- 
liam Htman and proceeded to business — 
when Elder William IIyman was chosen 
moderator, Elder Joseph Biggs clerk, 
and Brethren R. M. G. Moore and Joseph 
D. Biggs assistant clerks. 

3. Brethren in the ministry present from 
sister Associations (of the same faith and 



order) were invited to seats, when Elders 
James Wilder, John Stadler, Ichabod 
Moore, and Jesse Adams, seated them- 
selves. 

4. Letters from thirty-one churches 
Were read, and the names of the delegates 
enrolled, and the representation stated irr 
the table of churches. 

5. Petitionary letters for membership 
in this Association were called for, when 
one was handed in from Sawyer's Creek, 
Camden county, N. Ca. by their messen- 
gerss, John Lamb and Joseph Brown, and 
read, the prayer of their petition granted, 
and the moderator manifested the same, by 
giving the messengers the right hand of fel- 
lowship. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister 
Associations were called for, but none 
were received. Elders John Stadler 



SEw^a.™^*^**^^^. pf»»5» Mgawf^igrr?*****!* 


be 


te b 




^ 


*$*- 


Names of churches and 


-| 


? ?• 


S ft 1 S. 


ft ^ 


£ 


counties wherein PASTORS AND MESSENGERS. 


R' 


O <5~ 


S Sift 


P- 


situaledi 


a. 


S; ^ 


§ Si« ' «~ 


|5 


« 






2** 


^5 


l ill 


■ 


$ Cts 


1 Beargrass, Martin county, 1 William Whitaker,* Abram Peal, 






27| 


80 


2 Bl ou nt T sC r'k ,Beaufort,~\ 










I I 


30 




3 Cowenjoek, Currituck, 


Samuel Tatum, 


2 






12 17 


31! 


1 00 


4 Con oho, Martin, — 


Bi ount Coopek, John Bryan, 


I 








1 


44 


1 50 


5 Conetoe, Edgecombe, ~ 


John H. Daniel, William Thigpen, 








1 


| 


35 


1 50 


6 Concord, Washington, 


Micajah Ambrose,* Maxamilian Tatum, 










1 1 


29! 


1 00 


7 Cross Roads, Edgecombe, 


William Hyman, Sovereign Purvis, 










i 


32', 


1 00 


8 Cedar Island, Carteret,~\ 












| 


3i| 




9 Deep Creek, Halifax,— \ 












2 


20 


50 


10 Falls Tar River, Nath — 


Robert Sorey,* James S. Battle, 






1 




2 1 


63 


2 00 


11 Flat Swamp, P«'«, — 


Wm. W. K. Philpot,* Irvin Page, 


2 




2 


1 2 , 




54l 


1 00 


12 Flatly Creek, Pasquofk- 


Thomas Miller, Henry Overman, 


2 


1 


1 3 


7 


18( 


2 0O 


13 Frying- Pan, Tyrrell, — \ 
















18 




14 Fishing Creek, Halifax^- Stephen Nicholis, 






2 








60 


1 00 


15 Great Swamp, Pitt, — !Hardy Whitchard, John S. Brown,* 


1 




! 






60 


1 00 


1 6- Goo se Creek, Seaw/or/,--}- 
17 Kehukee, Halifax, — 


• 






3 






14 


1 00 


General Young, 










2 




129 


50 


18 Lawrence's mi h. Edge'e, 


Joshua Lawrence,* Richard Harrison, 










1 ! 




61 


1 50 


19 LittleAlligator,7\rrc//,-f 


' - 














6 




20 Morattock, Washington,^ 
















82 




21 North Creek, Beaufort,— 


Major John Clark, Thomas Barrow,* 








2 




38 


1 00 


22 Old Ford, Beaufort, — 


John Hodges.* David Singleton,* 














« 


30 


23 Picot m. h. Martin, — 


John Gi Smithwrick,* Joshua Robertson,* 














28 


1 00 


24 Powell's Point, CurrPk,- 


Hodges Gallop,* C. T. Sawyer, 


4 


1 






4 




, 4 4 


2 00 


25 Pun go, Beaufort, — 


Richard Davis, J chn R. Davis,* 


1 












15 


65 


28 Rocky Swamp, Halifax - 


Lemuel B. Bennett, W 7 arren Sharon,* 


7 


1 




1 


1 


57 


1 00 


27 Sappony, Nash, — 


A. B. .Baines,* Crawford Baker, 


I 








2 




61 


1 00 


28 Scuppernong, Tyrrell, — j 
















17 




39 So. Mattamuskeet, i^cfe, 


George W. Carrow'an,* R. M. Gi Moore, 


1 2 




2 




1 


1 


1 25 


30 Sandy : Grove, Nash, — 


Isaac Strickland, Ai B. Baines, 


34 




1 


2 




| 


92| 


1 00 


31 Skewarkey, Martin, 


Joseph Biggs, Joseph D. Biggs, 


i 


I 






3 




56 


1 00 


32 So. Quay, iSo'ampton, Va. 


Edwin Harrison, Elisha Durden, 








1 






70 


2 00 


33 Smith wick'sCr'k Martin, 


Humphrey Stallings, Bithal Leggett, 










I 




19 


50 


34 Sound Side, Tyrrell, — j 

35 Spring Green, Martin, — 
















37i 




Stephen Outterbridge, Jesse Ccburn, 




1 






2 




35j 


1 00 


36 Tarboro', Edgecombe, — 


Cottieid King,* 




2 




1 £ 




43 


1 00 


37 Washington, Beaufort, -j 












! 




37 




38 White Plains, Beaufort, 


Jonathan Wallace, A met Waters, € 
David Bradley,* Edward Power,* 


1 




1 


1 






28 


1 00 


39 Williams's ni.h. Edg'e,- 














35 


1 00 


40Sawyer'sCreek, - Camden,- 1 lohw Lamb, Joseph Brown,' 














14 


50 




Total, 


58>7 


12 


22 49 


101636 


34 50 



NOTE. Pastors of churches and other ordained Ministers are in small capitals; unordained 
Ministers in italic; those marked thus * were not present; from churches marked thus f w r e received 
no intelligence, in that case their number stands as last represented; dashes — denote no pastors; the 
last column shows the contributions from the chu relies this year to the Association fund. 

Time of holding Yearly IVLgETiNG at each Church. — Beargrass, 3rd Sunday and Saturday 
before in August; Cowenjoek, 3rd in March; Conoho, 1st in September; Conetoe, 3rd in September; 
Concord, 4th in September; Cross Roads, 2nd in September; Falls Tar River, 2nd in September; 
Flat Swamp, 1st. in September; Flatty Creek, 2nd in November; Great Swamp, 4th in September; 
Goose Creek, 3rd in September; Kehukee, 3rd in August; Lawrence's m, hi 4th in August; North 
Creek, 4th in August; Old Ford, 1st in September; Picot m. h. 3rd in August; Powell's Point, 1st 
in January; Pungo, 2nd in August; Rocky S'vvamp, 3rd in August; Sappony, 1st in September; So. 
Mattamuskeet, 1st in September; Sandy Grove, 2nd in October; Skewarkey, 2nd in August; South" 
Quay, 1st in June; Swithwick's Creek, 4th in August; Spring Green, 4th in September; Tarboro', 
1st in August; White Plains, 1st in August;. Williams's mi h. 3rd in August. 



and James Wilder and brethren Thomas iContentnea with a file of their Minutes 
Peterson and William Vanhook handed for- and Elder Jesse Adams from the Little 
ward a file 'of Minutes from the County jRiver with sundry copies of their Minutes, 
Line Association, stating, their appoint- (were severally receircd and took seats witli 
luent; Eider Ichakob MoOaX from the us-. 



7. The following committees were ap 
pointed, viz: Richard Harrison and James S. 
Battle on finance; Eiders Josljph Biggs 
and John Stadler. to examine the Cir- 
cular Letter, to report on Monday 
next. 

8. The following Elders were requested 
(by private ballot) to occupy J he si age by 
preaching on the morrow, viz: John Stad- 
ler, James Wilder and Jesse Adams, and 
that divine worship commence at 9 o'clock, 
A. M. 

9. A biography of Elder Micajah Per- 
ry was presented to this Association and 
read, and ordered to be attached to these 
JVIinuies. 

The Association then adjourned, with 
prayer by Elder Biggs, until Monday next, 
5 o'clock, A. SL 

SUNDAY, October 4th, 1840. 
The Elders appointed to the stage met 
an attentive congregation, Elder Jesse 
Adams preached from 2 Samuel, 23 chapter 
and 5th verse: "Although my house "be 
not so with God; yet he .hath made with 
me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all 
things, and sure: for this i-sali my salvation, 
and all my desire." Elder James Wil- 
der preached from 1st Peter, 2nd chapter 
and 4th verse: **To whom coming as unto 
a living; stone, disallowed indeed of men, 
but chosen of God, and precious." ( . Eldt r 
John Stadler closed and preached from 



is appointed our delegate to the White Oak 
Association, and agreed that we send them 
25 copies of our Minutes; to the Contentnea 
Association, Elders Blount Cooper, Hum- 
phrey Stallings, John H. Daniel, and 
brethren, Joseph D. Biggs, Ri,chard Harri- 
son, and Wrn. Thigpen with 25 copit s of 
our Minutes: To Little River Association, 
brethren Wallace Andrews, James S. Bat- 
tle, Richard Harrison and Elder Humph- 
rey Stallings, with 25 copies of our 
Minutes; and that we correspond with Ab- 
bott's Creek Union* Assrciation by send- 
ing them 25 copies of our Minutes. 

12. Two letters being presented from the 
church at Morat.look, Washington county, 
from which it appears that a difficulty ex- 
ists in said church, it is there fore resolved 
that a committee be appointed to visit said 
church, for the purpose of settling said dif- 
ficulty and that they report to next Asso- 
ciation, and that said committee be com- 
posed of Elders William Hyman, John 
H. Daniel, Humphrey Spellings, 
John Ward, and Blount Cooper, and 
brethren C. B. Hassell., Joseph D. Biggs, 
Major John Clark, and Richard Davis, 
a majority of -whom shall have power to 
act, and that they meet, with said church 
at Morattock on the third Sunday and 'Sat- 
urday befuie in May next 

13. Resolved, that we adjourn for 30 
minutes, in which time the committee 
of finance is to sit. On the return of the 



26th chapter of Acts, and latter clause of Associativa the.commiUee of finance repor 

3rd verse: u Wherefore I beseech thee to e d: 

hear me patiently.-' We hope the labors j 
were not in vain. 



MONDAY, October 5th, 1S40. 
The Association convened and was 
opened by singing and prayer by Elder 
Blount Cooper and proceeded to business. 
The members names were called over anil ab- 
sentees noted. 

10. The committees appointed on Satur- 
day la t were called on to report; when the 
•committee appointed to examine the Circu- 
lar Letter reported that they had done so, 
and recommended that the same be read in 
the Association; which was done/approved 
and ordered to be attached to our Min- 
utes. 

■11. Proceeded to appoint correspond 
■ence: To the Country Line Association, 
Eiders John H Daniel and William 
Hyman and brethren Richard Harrison -anti 
James S. Battle, to bear 25 copies of our M in 



That they find in the hands of the Treasurer at the 
close of last Association the sum of $53 16 

Paid for printing- last year's Minutes, $40 

Paid for preparing the Minutes for line 
press, and recording one copy- in 
the Association book, and distribu- 
ting the same, 15 

53 00 

Leaving a balance in the Treasurer's 

hands of $4 16 

Received in contributions from the chur- 
ches at this Association the sum of 34 50 



Leaving a balance now in hand of $38 66 

The Association concurred with -thj 
report, and the committee was ;dr chart- 
er!. 

14. Resolved, that ou.r next Association be 
held with the church at Little Conetoe, 
Edgecombe county, North Carolina, to 
commence on Saturday before the first 



Sunday in October, 184k at 11 o'clock, 

A. M. and that Eld. r Edwin Harrisost 

utes to them j Brother Richard E. Reaves, jj e requested, to preach an Introductory 



Bermon to that Association, and in case 
of his failure, Elder Blount Cooper. 

15. Elder Edwin Harrison is request- 
ed to prepare a Circular Letter for our 
next Association, and to choose his own 
subject. 

16. Resolved, that Eiders William 
Hyman, Blount Cooper, John H. 
Daniel, and brethren James S. Battle and 
Lemuel B. Bennett, be appointed a com- 
mittee to attend the church at Sandy Grove, 
Nash county, and enquire into her stand 



on the duty of the ministers to the church 
or churches. 2d, the duty of the church or 
churches to the minister or ministers. 3d, 
the good effect produced by a discharge of 
duty on both parts. 

In the first place, we believe it is the 
duty of the minister to devote the whole 
of his time/to the various functions of the 
ministry. In proof of this, take the fol- 
lowing scriptures, Paul to Timothy, 4th 
and 1 3th : Till I come, give attendance to 
reading, to exhortation, to doctrine. 14!h, 



ing of orthodoxy, a majority of whom have Neglect not the gift that is in thee, &c. 15th, 
power to act, and that said meeting be j Meditate upon these things, give thyself 
held with said church on the second | wholly to them, that thy profilting may 
Sunday and Saturday before in Decern- appear to all." He should undertake, and 



ber next, and that they report to next Asso- 
ciation. 



continue iii the church's service. He should 
neither express nor withhold any thin< 



17. On motion, It was resolved, that the whatever from personal motives. But 



resolution of our Association of 1S29 with 
regard to missionary preachers and opera- 
tions (to wit:) "If any minister, although 
he may be a missionary without the bounds 
of our Association, comes among us to 
preach the gospel, and not to make collec- 
tions, we do not reject him," be reconsid- 
ered; and resolved, by the Association, that 
we do not countenance them directly or in- 
directly. 

18. Resolved, that brethren Edwin 
Harrison and Blount Cooper be appoin- 
ted a committee, to attend the churches 



preach, exhort, reprove, rebuke, according 
to the honest dictates of his conscience, 
regulated by the word of God. He should 
be true to all his appointments, letting 
nothing but providential interposition 
prevent him. He should conduct himself 
meekly, quietly, and affectionately. He 
should visit them when sick, as often as 
possible. He should labor in a kind way 
to reclaim backsliders. He should be watch- 
ful for the«Jruth, and faithful in preaching 
it; always on the look out for error and 
prompt to give notice of its approach. He 



at Kehukee, and Deep Creek, and ascer-jShouM be ready to relieve necessity, ac? 
tain their situations, and report to next As- j cording to his ability, either in saint or sin- 
eo'c.iation. | ner. If any brother or sisler is in a 

19. Resolved, that the churches compo- | situation to render them unable to go to 
sing this Association be requested to en- ! preaching, he ought to visit regularly all 
large their contributions next year, so as to ' such. He ought to set good examples; 
make the fund necessary to defray the char- 1 such as even and sober conduct, a patient 



gesof the Association. 



and unruffled temper- a meek, quiet, con- 



20. Elder Joseph Biggs is requested : tented and cheerful spirit; and true and ju- 
to prepare these minutes for the press, j dicious words; for had examples will bring 



superintend the printing of 500 copies j reproach upon himself, or lead the church 
thereof, and distribute them as usual, into disorder. 



and that he be paid therefore fifteen dol- 
lars. 

The Association then adjourned to the 
time and place appointed, with prayer by 
Elder John Stadlek. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Mod'r. 

JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk. 

circul.au letter. 

The members that compose the Kehukee 
Baptist Association to the churches tfjey 
represent, 

Beloved Brethren and Sisters: We 
shall lay before vou a. few of our thoughts 



3d, The duty of the church or churches 
to their minister: we believe it is the duty 
of the church, whenever they call in a 
minister to attend them as pastor, (or in 
any other way) to enable him to aftend 
Ihern without leaving his family to suffer 
for the necessary comforts of life. When 
our Lord had called his twelve disciples 
unto him, and sent them out topreach, Matt. 
10 chap. He told thorn, verse 9th: <-Pio- 
yide neither gold or silver, nor brass in 
your purses; Verse 10th, Nor scrip for 
your journey; neither two coats, neither 
shoes, nor yet staves, for the workman is 
worthy of his n3ea|/'-*?T||is (ibundaiitly 



5 



preves, that they were to he supported, or 
fed and clothed. Again, 1st Corinthians, 
9lh and 7th: "Who goetha warfare at any 
time, at his own charges; who planteth a 
vineyard, and eateth not of the fruit there- 
of; or who feedeth a floek and eateth not 
of the milk of the flock?" "Let hira that 
is taught in the word, communicate to 
him that teacheth in all good things." 
.Galatians, 6th and 6th. The above passa- 
ges fully prove, that it is the duty of 
the churches to support their preach- 
ers. 

But some perhaps will say, it will not 
do to give preachers any thing, for it will 
make them proud and destroy their useful- 
ness. If you have such an opinion as this 
of any preacher in the bounds of the Kehu- 
kee Association, our advice is to give him 
plenty, and get him out of the way. But 
we believe, instead of that being the case, 
many of the ministers- in the Kehukee As- 
sociation have had their usefulness curtail- 
ed, (if not destroyed,) because the church- 
es have failed to do their duty towards 
them. As the deacons of the churches are 
the proper persons to attend to this matter, 
that is to receive, and hand over to the 
minister, the contribution of the church, 
we would say to you, brethren deacons, re- 
member the responsibility that rests upon 
you, a-nd also the promise to you if you 
use your office well. For says Paul to 
Timothy:" They that have used the of- 
fice of a deacon well, purchase to them- 
selves a good degree, and great boldness in 
the faith, which isinC-hriftlJ^jjgtifl''. But 
does that deacon, who never inquires into 
the situation of his minister in life, nor 
contributes any thing to him, use the 
office of a deacon well"? You know not. 
O brother deacons, awake to your duty. 
Examine closely into the situation of your 
minister,and if you find he has need of any 
of the comforts of life, you should inform 
the rest of the brethren and sisters, and 
call on them to administer to his necessi- 
ties. 

it is also the duty of the members of the 
church, to visit the preacher when sick; 
to give heed to, and be obedient co his re- 
proofs, and admonitions, so far as they are 
scriptural, and required or deserved by the 
church; to attend all their meetings; to 
watch over him for good; they should es- 
teem himwhen sound, faithful, and orderly; 
and dean gently, but faithfully, with him for 
error, in doctrine or practice; they ought 
to rectify his mistakes,, but do it with cau- 



tion. The good efifec's of such conduct, 
between a minister and his flock, will be 
to him, a healthy state in preaching; will 
be productive of more life, more animation* 
more zeal, more devotion, more knowledge, 
and skill in the mysteries of the gospel, 
more light and comfort in expounding the 
scriptures; less worldly mindeuness, and 
more gladness in meeting; the church. To 
the church it will prove, a source of in- 
creased affection to their ministers, more 
confidence, more edification, a richer table 
of gospel food, a more tender regard for 
the cause of God, and the honor of religion; 
more scriptural mindedness, and heavenly 
mindedness; less love of the world, and 
more gentleness, moderation, meekness, 
humility, more light to the world, and 
more beauty and excellence and glory in 
religion. But. when the ministers of the 
gospel generally depatt from their duty, be- 
ing distrustful of the providence, and prom- 
ises of God, the churches will also forsake 
their duty; or when the churches forget, and 
neglect their duty to their minister, he will 
necessarily leave his post, and in either case 
the church will soon present the picture 
of a planted, butuntended garden; or a peo- 
ple who do not like to retain God in their 
knowledge. And whenever ministers ap- 
pear eonscienciously, and contentedly, to 
spend only two days in the week, and 
sometimes not that in attending to the du- 
ties of their office, the churches will irnj» 
tate their bad examples, and immediately 
discharge, an equally small proportion of 
their duty. 

In this state of tilings, it is needless for 
j ministers to exhort churches, it is vain for 
j Associations to write circulars, the con- 
| duct of both ministers and churches, de- 
i clare, that it is only for the name of the 
thing that they write, and we would give 
it as our opinion, that the relative and re- 
ciprocal duties between chinches and min» 
isiers, ought never to be named again, d-n- 
til the one or the other returns from that 
far gone wandering, where they now are, 
to the place where they ought to be found. 
The breath, the paper, the labor, are all 
lost. Therefore, return, watchmen, to 
your posts, or complain no more of the 
churches. Return, O churches, to your 
duties, or complain no more of your minis- 
ters. Lord, help thy ministers to rely on 
thy promises, and return to their duties; 
give thy churches grace, to enable them to 
feel their duties, and a willingness to com- 
ply therewith- Amsn,. 



A BIOGRAPHY OF 

ELDER MICAJAH PERRY. 

He was born in Martin count v, N. C. on 
the 5th day of June, 1786. His occupa- 
tion till grown was principally farming. 
His father, William Perry, was a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church, first at Skewar- 
key, and then at Smithwick's Creek. The 
son professed religion and joined the 
church upon, an experience of grace at 
an early age, in August, 1803. He was 
received a member at Skewarkey, and in 
October following, he with his father and 
others were dismissed from that church, to 
form one at Smithwick's Creek; he was 
then only about 17 years old. His mem- 
bership was continued at Smithwick's 
Creek Meeting House until September, 
'1S09, at which time he was excommunica- 
led from the church, for the' sin of gam- 
bling. And awful to relate, he remained 
in that excommunicatedstate, for the space 
of nearly 15 years, during which time he 
was quite abandoned, exceedingly wicked, 
and apparently altogether devoted to the 
vanities of the wo; Id ; yet it was observed, 
that he ever paid a marked respect to re- 
ligious characters, and the ordinances of the 
churches when in the presence of the peo- 
ple of God, or witnessing the performance 
of the sacred rites. 

fn the year 1821, it pleased God to re- 
claim this backsliding son of his, bring him 
again to the Lord's house, direct his feet 
anew into the pathway of obedience, and 
With penitent tears and a contrite heart, 



arid whose thoughts are higher than 'our 
thoughts, soon relieved the minds of his 
people, on the score of Elder Perry's fifcse* 
fulness, by convincing them t hat he had 
only began, as Ha would hold out to 
the end of his ministry; strong in faith, 
powerful inhandlingt he doetrineof election, 
predestination, and 'he final perseverance 
of the saints in grace; always armed, and 
armed at all points with the christian arm- 
or. 

During the latter part of his life whether in 
or out. of the pulpit, his chief delight appear- 
ed to consist in treating on the strong points 
in redemption's scheme, to gloryin the elec- 
ting love of God to sinners, to spiritualize 
the word of God, & to draw instruction from 
ail the evidence of God's providence, in the 
material, as well as spiritual world around 
him. His biographer has often said to 
him,' something like the following: "Bro- 
ther Perry, I believe you could spiritualize 
a stone or a horse block, and turn the sub- 
ject to some good account," It did appear 
that his mind was never off the subject of 
religion entirely, and whether he was at his 
daily avocation on the farm, in public or pri- 
vate as emblies as well as in the house of 
God, he would be discoursing on the subject 
of religion, provided a kindred spirit could 
be found to join with him in conversation. 

Elder Perry's education was very limit- 
ed, almost as good as none at all; in preach- 
ing the gospel he made u-e of such, and such 
language only, as he understood the pur- 
port of himself, disdaining borrowed flights 
or ambiguous phrases; and the consequence 
was, that his delivery much improved be- 



thi>humbled sinner went and asked forgive- j fore he died. He acted upon a judicious 
ness of the church, and was again received J principle, what he gained he retained, 
into her bosom, July 1824. Me had now pas- | and marched gradually on toward perfec- 



sed through a fiery trial, which was to re- , ti 



in-. 



He 



was 



valiant soldier of th< 



suit advantageously tp the chinch. He soon \ cross, and handled the word ot Gcftl skii- 
began to exercise his gift,.& it was apparent fully, always turning his discourses to the 
God had called him to the work of the min- 
is! ry. He began to pi each in 1829, and 
in 1S32 was set apart,and ordained, to that 



account of God's glory, and making them 
to correspond with the great scheme of re- 
demption; like some other preachers, he 
lank by a presbytery composed of El- j had his favorite hymns and texts, which 
ders Joseph Biggs and Lemuel Ross. j he thought most calculated to convey in 

A while after Elder Perry had common- j the fewest words, the excellence of God's 
ced preaching, his manner in particular, I plan of salvation, and its cei tain application 
was (iisesteemea oy many", of his brethren! to the elect. And the hymns trequent- 
.1 thoy began to fear, that his ministry ly given out by him, for the congregation 



would prove productive of little good, to 
either saint or sinner. lie s,joke vehem- 
ently & apparently in an angry mood, such as 
seemed well nigh calculated, to drive ail reir-- 
der emotions from the minds of the people; 
but God, vVho'se ways are notus ou* - ways. 



to sing, was thstone unsurpassed, perhaps 
for orthodoxy, by any other yet compos- 
ed, commencing with these words: 

"Twixf. Jesus. and the eltdsfefl race*, 
SaWstsa bond ol endless grice, ,, &.c. &Oi 
To which liymn, the reader's attention 



is directed, for .mother evidence of the uni- 
form train of Elder Perry's thoughts. And 
while the audience were singing this hymn 
his countenance would brighten up, and 
evidence to all around, the pleasure he 
felt in the declaration of such divine truths. 
He considered his chief commission, to 
be like unto that given to Peter: '-Feed 
my sheep.' 7 And in that capacity, his 
powers were principally developed; never- 
theless, he failed not to hold out, the invita- 
tions of*the gospel, to the unconverted; 
telling them that the atonement was already 
made, the feast ready, and whosoever 
would come, might come, and partake of 
the water of hfe freely. During his minis- 
terial career, he attended pretty considera- 
bly, the churches at Smithwick's Creek, 
Picot, Morattock, and. Old Ford. 

Elder Perry was a man of high tempera- 
ment, ready to act, and ready to speak his 
mind freely, on all proper occasions. He 
possessed a spirit of until ing industry, and 
was an excellent farmer. Some portion 
of his brethren did not think he devoted 
himself sufficiently to the work of the min- 
istry, being so much engaged in domes- 
tic and secular affairs. He was by some 
on that account supposed eager for wealth, 
but the writer of this sketch is far from coin- 
ciding in that opinion. Elder Perry was 
a liberal minded man, he Jived plentifully 
and did not deny himself or family the ne- 
cessaries and comforts of life. Consequent- 
ly he went considerably in debt, and the 
fruits of his great industry were intended we 



mass wealth. He had been residing about 
three years previous to his death in the coun- 
ty of Washington, but in the fall of 1839 re- 
turned to his old. residence in Martin; and 
while the churches in his neighborhood 
were rejoicing at his return amongst them, 
and Mattering themselves that they should 
then for an uninterrupted period enjoy the 
blessings of his ministry, the almighty God 
and heavenly Father, was pleased to defeat 
their expectation in calling his servant 
home, to realize with the Saviour of sinners 
joint inheritance to the glories of the upper 
world. He died on the 21st day of De- 
cember 1839. from a wound occasioned by 
the fall of a tree. He and his son were 
felling trees near his dwelling house, one 
was falling, Elder Perry thought a little 
child of his in danger, that was playing not 
far from him and sprang to rescue it, pass- 
ing under the tree; it struck him, and al- 
though a mere sapling;, it settled him to the 
earth, breaking his ribs, &c. &c. He w.;s 
taken to the house, and died in a few days 
thereafter. Thus fell a valiant soldier 
of the cross, a brave man, and a hardy yeo- 
man, in the fifty-fourth year of hisage. 

After encountering fatigues and hardships, 
dangersand difficulties, in a thousand- shapes 
for half a century, this servant of God was 
suddenly cut off. by a circumstance, the 
most trivial in its nature. The Lord gave, 
and the Lord hath taken away, and let his 
name be blessed. "O the depth of the 
riches, both of the wisdom and knowledge 
of God, how unsearchable are his>judg- 



think to relieve his creditors, rather than a- monts, and his ways past finding out. 



Tdrboro 1 Fress. 



s 



;» a 



OF THfi 



Kehukee Baptist . Association , 



HELD AT 



Lf tile Concfoe Creek Meeting Blouse' 



'^? 



Etlgccombc County, JYt C* 

Commencing on Saturday before the first Sunday in October, 1S41 



SAT'CKDAV, 2nd October, 184i. 
l.The Introductory Sermon was delivered 
by Elder Blount Cooper, from Acts, 20 
chap. 08 terse: Talke heed therefore unto 
yourselves, and to all the flock over the 
which the Holy Ghost hafh made you over- 
seers', to Heed the church of God, which he 
hath purchased with his own blood. Pray- 
er by f21def Harrison. 

2. The delegates from the several chur- 
ches then assembled, and the Association 
Was opened- with prayer" by Elder Joseph 
Biggs*, and* proceeded to' business — when 
Elder WftLtAM Hyman was chosen mod- 
erator, Elder Joseph* Biggs clerk, and 
brethren Joseph £)'. Biggs and R. M. G. 
IVloore assistant clerks. 

3; Brethren in the ministry from sister 
Associations (of the same faith and order) 
-ft ere invited to sit with us, when Elders 
John Stad"ler, Samuel Moore, David 
J. Mott, PArham Puckett, Thomas 
Dupree, James -Wilder, and Mark Ben- 
nett seated themselves. 

4. Letters from thirty-two churches 
Were handed in and read,'and the name's' of 
the delegates enrolled, and the representa- 
tion stated in the table of churches. 



5. Petitionary letters for membership iri 
this Association were called for. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister 
Associations were called for. Elders P. 
Puckett and D. J. Mo'tt, from the White 
Oak; John Stadler and James Wilder 
from the Country Line; Mark Bennett 
Thomas Dupree, and Samuel Moore, 
from the Contentnea, with copies of their 
Minutes, were severally received and took 
seats with us. 

7. The following committees were ap- 
pointed, viz: Brethren James S. Battle and 
Richard Harrison on finance; Elders Mark 
Bennett, John Stadler, Thomas Du- 
pree, and Edwin Harrison, to examine 
the Circular Letter; to report on Monday 
next; 

8. Elders John Stadler, James Wil- 
der, and ParhaM Puckett, are request- 
ed, (.by private ballot.) to preach on the 
stage to-morrow, and that worship begin 
at 10 o'clock. 

9. The committees appointed last year 
in the cases of Sandy Grove, Morattock,' 
Kehukee, and Deep Creek, being called on- 
to report, did so,, and were severally dis< 
charged. 



Names of churches and 

counties wherein 

situated. 



1 Co.- to: bj fefll b 



~?£;3; 



DELEGATES & PASTORS 



« i a 



1 J3ear«rrass, Martin county, Wm. Whitaker,* Abram Peel, 



2 Blou nt'sC r'k , Beau fort, - 

3 Con oho, Martin, 

4 Concord, Washington, 

5 Conetoe, Edgecombe, 

6 Cowoa\]ocU , Currituck, j 

7 Cross Roads, Edgecombe, 



Lodowick Redick, 

John Bryan, Blount Cooper, 

Mafr'h Talam,* Dan'l Clifton,* 

John H. Danikl, ti> E. Heaves. 

Samuel Tatum, 

Wm. Byman, Sovereign Purvis, 

8 Cedar Island, Carteret,— i'ho's Robinson', Ste'n Emery,* 

9 Deep Creek, Halifax, — f 
'Moses Joyner, James S. Battle, 
Wv W. IL Philpot, Irvin Page, 



IIS 



1 2 



10 Falls Tar River, Nash, 
VI Flat Swamp, Fill, — 
1 ; 2 Fl a tty C 1 eek , Pas qimt%-~\ [ 

13 Frying Pan, Tyrrell, — f| 

14 Fishing Creek, Halifax,-' Willie Powell", Stephen Nichols, 

15 Great Swamp, Pitt, — John S. Brown, H. Wliitchard, 
1-6 Goose Creek, Beaufort, — ;Robert Carnpain, Jasi Potter,* 

17 Kehukee, Halifax, — f 

18 Lawrence's m. h, Z^e^,: Joshua Lawrence, Fv'd Harrison, 
V& Little Alligator, 7 'yrrell,-^\ 

20 Morattock, Washington, - W m. Gray,* Hardy Everett, 

21 North Creek, Beaufort, -Tho's Barrow, Noah Gaskill, 

22 Old Ford, Beaufort, — f | 

23 Picot m. hi Martin, — \C lay ton Moore, Mis* Harrison * 

24 Powell's Point, CvrriPkyJ.G . F. Sawyer,* Si Sawyer,| 
25' Pungo^ Beaufort? — ! iRichard Davis, Samuel Clark, 
S6 Rocky Swamp, Halifax*,-^ Lem? I B.BinnettM . W.Sheari»,* 

27 Sappony, Nash, — j A. B. Bains, jr. Elsey Taylor, 

28 Scuppernong, Tyrrell, — fj 

29 So. Mattamuskeetyi/#sfe, G.W C Aft naWAic,*R^.M.&. Moore 

30 Sandy Grove, Nash, — j- | 

31 Skewarkey, Martin, JJoskph Biggs, Joseph D. Biggs, 

32 Sawyer'sCreek, Camden, - , John Lainh> 

33 So. Quay, So" 1 ampton, Fa.! Edwin Harrison, A.L.Gardner, 
34SmithwiGk'sCr'k,Ma?7/n,jHuMPHUEYSTALLiNGS B.Leggett, 

35 Sound Side, Tyrrell, — f | 

36 Spring Green, Martin, — Jkhn Griffin, Aldridge Andrews, 

37 Tarboro', Edgecombe, — 'Daniel Land, C. King,- 

38 Washington, Bwvfwfc — Jacob Swindell, D. Wilkinson, | 

39 White Plains, Beaufort, 'Jonathan Wallace, A. Waters,! 
4$ Williams's m. h.Edge'e,^ David Bradley, Ed. Power, j 



11 



a i § si 

I*S* 



Yearly 
Meetings, 



»*$ Utsi 



I 1 



1 
1 

p 1 
1 



Total. 38 15 12 21 39 



23 



30, 
47 

27 
36 

I 

3o: 

23 



85||3d Sunday 
jinAugiand 
lSat.be fore 

00'!3d in MaFv 

50 1 1 1st in Sep. 

00;|4thin Sep. 

50||3din Sept.. 
1 1 3d in Ma**. 

50 1 t2ll in Septv 

50' | 



61 2 00 jadinSopf.- 
47! 1 50 list in Sep. 
18: 2 00 |2d in NoW 



41; 1 00 

60 ! 1 00 
16, 1 00 

62 I 50 



74 
36 

24 
41 

16 

58 
50 

49 

52 
12 

65 

2J 

33 
50 
30 

28 
35 



1 50 
1 00 



2 50 

1 50 

1 00 

2 50 
1 00 

50 
1 00 



4th in Sep* 
3d in Sept. 
3d in Aug. 
4th inAuH> 



4th in Aug. 
list in Sep» 
s3d in Aug. 
■2d in Jaiir- 
2d iii Aug. 
|3il in Augo' 
1st in Sep» 



1 1st in 
I2d in 
»2d in Au<r; 



Sep. 
Oct, 



1st in 
4th in 



~3l*4th in 
00'flstin 
lolllstiu 



June 
Aug. 

Sep. 
Augi- 1 
Au"> 



50 



50:£3d in Aug - 



120045 45 



NOTE'.' Pastors of churches and other ordained Ministers are in small capitals; unordained ; 
Srlinisters in ifaUc,- those marked thus * were not present; from churches marked thus f we received 
no intelligence, in that case their number stands as last represented; dashes — denote no Pastors; the 
column next to the last shows the contributions from the churches^to the Association fund this year;;, 
the last column shows the yearly meetings of each church. 



10. Several queries were read, and laid 
©ver until Monday next. 

The Association I hen adjourned with 
singing by Elder J. Stapler, until Mon- 
day next, 9 o'clock, A. iVi. 

SUNDAY, October 3rd, 1841. 
The brethren appointed preached this 
day. Elders Stabler arid Wilder piea- 
ehed at the meeting house; and; as It was 



very rainy, Eiders Puckett and Martin 
preached at Elder John H. Daniel's. 
Elder Stadler preached from Isaiah, 60 
chap. 21 verse; Thy people also shall be 
all righteous:- they shall inherit, the land 
forever, the branch of my planting, the 
work of my hands, that I may be glorified. 
Elder Wilder preached from 2 epistle 
John, 10th and 11th verses: If there come 
any unto you, and bring not this doctrine, 



^receive him not inlo your house, neither 
bid him God speed: for lie that biddeih 
him God speed, is partaker of his evil 
deeds. The people were very attentive. 

MONDAY, October 4ih, 1841. 

The Association being met and opened 
with pra\er by Elder William Hyman, 
proceed i'd to business. 

11. The names of the delegates were 
called, and absentees noted as stated in the 
table of churches. 

12. The Constitution and Rules of De- 
corum, were read. 

13. The following query being present- 
ed by Elder Cooper, was read and recei- 
ved for debate: Is it agreeable to gospel 
order to receive a member in one of our 
jchurches, that has been expelled from a 
dvurch of the missionary order because be 
don't believe in their faith and practice? 
After debate, the query was withdrawn by 
the querist. The following query bein. 



aengers to the Little River Association.* 
and that we send twenty-five copies of our 
Minutes; and agreed that they have a cer- 
tificate of their appointment. 

IS. Resolved, that we send twenty-five 
copies of our Minutes to the Abbott's 
Creek Union Association. 

19 Resolved, that our next Association 
be held with the church at Skewarkey, 
Martin county, to commence Saturday be- 
fore the first Sunday in October next; and 
that Eider Joshua Lawrence preach the 
Introductory Sermon, and Elder Hyman 
in case of failure. Divine service to com- 
mence aft 1 1 o'clock, A. M. 

20 Resolved, that Elder Lawrence 
write a Circular Letter for our next Asso- 
ciation. 

21. A Biography of Elder Lemuel 
Ross was handed forward and read, and 
ordered to be attached to our Minutes., 

22. Resolved, that the committee of 
finance sit in time to receive the contribu- 

presen'ed by Elder Lawrence, was read, I tions from the churches, for three quarters 

received for debate, and answered: Are of at) hour. The committee of finance re- 

«ueh persons as are baptized by missionary ported: — 

Baptists to be received in the Old School ' Tfeat tW; WTIS 1n foe hands oF the Trea- 

churches, or not, without re-baptssm? An- | surer at. the close of last Association 

swer, No. The following query being the stifca of $38 6S 

presented by Elder Lawrence, was read, fi*ceived for the churches at this Asso'n, Ah 45 

received for debate, and answered: In what 

.state and condition should a church be in, 

<n order to scripturally commune at the 

Lord's table? Answer, fellowship. Or, 

whether a church may commune under 

any circumstance whenever she pleases so 

to do? Answer, no communion without 

•union in action. 

14. Resolved, that Elders William Hy- 



Pdiii for printing last, year's Minutes, $20 
For transcribing, recording, &c. 15 



$84 11 



35 00 



.Now in the hands of the Treasurer, $49 11 

The Assoc ia ton concurred with the re- 
port, and the committee was discharged. 
23. Resolved, that brother Charles 
may and Blount Cooper, and brethren Blount be requested to co'lectand prepare 
Richard Harrison and James S, Battle, be a biographical sketch of Elder Micajah 
*mr messengers to the Country Line Asso- Ambrose, and hand it forward at next As- 
ci.ition, and that we tend twenty-five soci'ation. 

copies of our Minutes. j £4. The committee appointed to exam- 

15. Resolved, that brethren Richard E. ine the Cireulat Letter reported unfavora. 
Reaves and William Thigpen, be appoint- bly; which was concurred in. 
ed our messengers to the VVhite Oak Asso- ! 25. Resolved, that Elders Joshua Law- 
ciation, and that we send twenty-five cop- rence and John H. Daniel be appointed 
ies of our M 'unites. j to prepare something in the form of a Cir- 

cular Letter, to be attached to these Min- 
nies. 

It appearing to the Association, that the 
Reaves and Joseph D. Biggs, be appointed | church at Old Ford having been dissolved, 
our messengers to the Contentnea Associa- [and the members thereof having joined the 
lion, and that we send twenty-five copies j church at Smithwick's Creek, it is ordered 
of our Minutes. I that her name be stricken from the table of 

17. Resolved, that Eider BuMPHREY churches. 
Stallings, and brethren Robert I). Bart 27 Resolved, that the following churches, 
and James Ell nor, be appointed our mes- j which have failed to represent themselves 



16. Resolved, that Elders William 
Hyman, Blount CoorEit, and Humphrey 
Stallings, and brethren Richard R. 



In this Association, be requested to inform 
the next Association the reason they have 
failed to represent themselves: Deep 
Creek, Frying Pan, Little Alligator, and 
Scuppernong. 

25. Resolved, that Elder Jos. Biggs be re- 
quested to transcribe these Minutes for the 
press, &c. and that he have 650 copies 
printed and distributed as usual, and that 
he be paid $15 therefor. 

The Association then adjourned to J he 
time and place appointed, with prayer by 
Elder Jos. Biggs. 

WILLIAM IIYMAN, Mod'r. 
JOS.. BIGGS, Clerk, 



CIRCULAR LETTER, 

The Kehukee Association, now sitting 
at Little Creek meeting house, Edgecombe 
county, N. C. October the 2nd, 31, and 
4th, IS41, to the churches they represent, 
send greeting. Wishing great grace, mer- 
cy, peace, union, brotherly love and fel- 
lowship to abound among you all. And 
that God would speedily hear the sighs, 
and groans, and prayers of ail the poor 
and disconsolate in Zion, in behalf of all 
the churches, to build and repair the waste 
places of Zion with new converts, such 
and such only as the Lord will have to be 
saved. And thereby cause gcngs of joy 
in her palaces, because the time of refresh- 
ing had come from the presence of the 
Lord to old saints and sinners. For this 
we wish the churches to ever fervently 
pray. 

The churches will expect to find in our 
Minutes a Circular Letter, as it has bt en 
so long our practice to send them one on , 
thereof the Association. And, -as the! 1 
churches have furnished us with money so 
to do, we feel under obligations to com- 
ply with their expectations, so long as they 
sijall furnish the means of printing the 
S'ime, by the fund of the Association. We 
therefore send you the following pieces for 
consideration. 

The Golden Rule to measure Profes- 
sors by. 

Some Christians, or professors, measure 
themselves by themselves; these, Paul 
says, are not wise. Some measure them- 
selves by other professors, these are equal- 
ly unwise, for oiher professors being 
wrong they may be Wrong also. Some 
measure themselves by their false zeal, as 



did Jehu. Some by their fasting, praying, 
number of prayers and gifts of alms, as did 
the Pharisees. Some by the measure of 
the Sadducees — there is no resurrection of 
the dead, no hell nor hereafter. Some by 
their moral character, as never having 
been guilty of any gross sins. Some by 
their honor, honesty and just dealings to- 
wards mankind. Some by this; because 
they can preach and pray, and the people 
and church think very highly of their 
preaching and religion. Some by their 
conviction & sorrow for sin; as Judas, Cain 
and Esau. Some by their sorrow for sin, 
and great extacy of joy; as the stony 
ground hearers. Some by their profes- 
sion of religion, and being members of the 
church, and can say, Lord we have eaten 
and drunk in thy name. Some by their 
knowledge in the scriptures & the mystery 
of salvation. Some because they have got 
good hearts and never did any body any 
harm. All these and a hundred others, 
are measures by which men measure them- 
selves, and form their hopes therefrom for 
heaven and glory, and think they stand as 
lair a chance for heaven as any body else. 
But these all are false measures — and mea- 
suring themselves by a false measure, their 
conclusions and hopes are false also. But 
the Golden Rule and unchangeable mea- 
sure, in all ages and in all countries to try 
Christians by, and for a man to measure 
his religion by, is love to God, love tq 
Christ, and love to saints. This is the un* 
deviating rule, the infallible measure, that 
never was nor never can be counterfeited, 
by men or devils. Devils may tremble, 
weep, and howl- but devjls cannot love 
God, Christ, nor saints. Natural men 
may weep and repent, like Esau; or con- 



and pray, sing and give a}ms-^but natural 
men cannot love God, Christ, nor saints; 
lor the carnal mind is enmity against God. 
And marvel not that the world hate you, 
my apostles, says Christ; you know it ha- 
ted me before it hated you- Then love is 
the quintessence of true religion, the hea- 
venly mark of a Christian, that never was 
nor never can be counterfeited by all dev- 
ils in hell, or men and hypocrites on earth, 
Then let all men measure their religion 
By their love to God, Christ, and saints, 
for this nark never faileth in no ag2 nor 
in no country, of being the true Christian 
measure. Let us read: '-to love the Ltud 
thy God Willi ail thy heart, and thy neigh- 
bor as thyselfj on the.-e twy hang all the 



flaw and the prophets." "Love is the ful- 
filling of the law." "Love worketh no 
ill lo his neighbor." "-If any man love 
notour Lord Jesus Chris', let him be ac- 
cursed." "By this shall all men know ye 
are my disciples, if you have love one to- 
wards another. " "By this we know we 
have passed from death to life, because we 
love the brethren." "He that saith he 
loveth (j-od and hateth his brother, Is a liar." 
"He that loveth God loveth his brother al- 
so." Now abideth faith, hope, charity; 
hut the greatest of thesethree is charity — 
charity, or love to God, Christ and saints, 
never faileth — faith to remove mountains 
may fail; prophecy, tongues, and knowl- 
edge of all mystery may fail; goods to 
feed the poor, and zeal to give the body to 
be burned, may fail — if all these were to 
exist, without charity the measure would 
fail, and the man be as a tinkling cymbal, 
a dead man giving sound, and he noihing 
and not a spark of religion with all his 
preaching, prayers, fasting, alms and zeal; 
hut like the Pharisee, to receive the great- 
er damnation for his hypocrisy. 

Then let all men measure their religion 
hy their love to God, Christ, and saints. 
He that is void of these has not one spark 
of true religion. u He that saith he loves 
God and keeprjth not his commandments, 
is a liar." "By this we know we love 
God, if we keep Ids commandments." 
"lie that loveth me (saith Christ) keepeth 
my commandments, and shall be loved of 
my Father." Now try by this measure 
how many Christians you can find. The 
love of Christ, says Paul, constraineth us — ■ 
that is, to obedience to him. Now try 
yourselves by these texts, and you may I 



tekel, found 
his brother 
and gives him 



say of t housands 

"lie that seeth his brother need thi 
world's goods, and gives him not those I 
things he needs, how dwelleth the love of 
God in that mat)?'' "Dearly beioved, if 
God so loved us, we ought also to love one j 
another." ''We ought to lay down our I 
lives for the brethren." These texts ate j 
tits tine Christian never-fading measure. 
Gome to these and try your' religion, and j 
the religion of others, and then you may 
say as one said in old time, Lord, arc there j 
few that shall be saved? Yes, add, though J 
the children of America and I he ten thous- j 
and professors be as the sand of the sea, it j 
js but a remnant that shall be saved; for the j 
Lord will finish the work and cut it short 
in righieouMicss, b- cause a -short work will 
the Lure] make pa the earth, 



But how shall I know I love God? An- 
swer. He that loveth God, the same U 
known of him. Do you think a man can 
love and not know it? No, sir, such a 
thing cannot be. He that loveth God 
keepeih his commandments. This is the 
way you are to know whether you love 
God or not. How shall i know I love 
Christ? Answer. If you feel a constrain- 
ing influence to yield obedience to each 
and every one of his commandments; for 
Christ says, he that loveth me keepeth my 
commandments. How shall I know I 
love saints? By giving them such things 
as they need, for then your love is not in 
word, but as the scripture saith, but in deed 
and truth — by choosing and preferring 
their company; by living in peace, union 
and fellowship with them; by forgiving 
them all offences against you; by covering 
their failings with the mantle of charity; 
by delighting to worship God with them; 
by feeling they are your choice compan- 
ions on earth; by feeling their conversation 
about heavenly things is pleasing and re- 
freshing and strengthening to your soul — 
in a word, by feelings of love sometimes in 
the heart, that endears them to you as pre- 
cious objects of your affection, that sweet- 
ens the heart and perfumes all the place 
where you have met, and makes you loth 
to part with objects so dear. 

Missionary Pries/craft — no pay, no 
p/eacher. 

Pay me well, 

And I'll help save your souls from heli$ 

Or, like the swan, 

When winter is coming on, 

I to warmer climes must go, 

For God has call'd me there to preach, I will lei 
you know; 

And before I on my journey wag, 

I must the reason let you know, it is because I do 
not get the bagi 

For to work I am too grand, 

'then in the pulpit I will take my stand, 

And there he speaks with artful guile, 

The reason is he wants his pot his neighbor's 
meat to boil. 

His table richly clad and spread, 

V\ hh the honest delver's bread; 

And whether he wears coat or gown, 

His preaching is for money down. 

But money down men cannot always pay, 

Then promises from church or boards will do a fu- 
ture day t 

Pray at this do not start, 

For if { beg for you I must share a parti 

And if J choose to foreign climes to go, 

Whether God has call'd me there or no, 

Money in my bag I must have, 

To help me the people's souls to save. 

Tho' Peler thro' Jewish cities took his tour, 

And Paul the Asiatic coast did scourj 



6 



Yet for the bag these never wont, 

For God had these apostles sent. 

Yet Judas, never call'd of God, to the eleven him 

self did join, 
And this you know was had, and thus his theft in 

manner clandestine. 
His bargain, sale trade, and death, proves he went 

for the bag. 
80 men who hire out themselves to teach, 
Prove to all around that it is for the bag they 

preach 1 
Judas the bag did carry, we are told, 
And it was this that kept him in the fold; 
But when greater gain of others he could make, 
He did the cvaviour and his cause and his people 

all forsake. 
So let it be once to the Old Baptist, churches told, 
That in my esteem the missionaries have the Old 

Baptist cause for money sold; 
And because they can by missions more money 

make, 
Therefore they do the Old Baptist cause and their 

brethren all forsaket 
For had not the mission scheme of money invent- 

. • ed been, the hireling for to pay, 
Toe United Baptist churches wwuid have remain- 
ed in union to this day. 



BIOGRAPHY OF 

ELDER LEMUEL ROSS. 



Lemnel Ross, son of Benjamin and Pru- 
dence Rpss, was Horn May the first 1783, in 
Long Acre, Beaufort county, N. C. Lit- 
tle is known of ihe history of Elder Ross, 
until he arrived to the age of maturity. In 
the year 1810. he became a member of the 
JJaplist Church at Blount's Creek, and the 
ordinance of baptism was administered to 
him by Eld^r John McCabe. About two 
'tars after his connection with the church, 
ie commenced ihe exercise of ministerial 



Aboul the year 1825 or 1826, he moved 
and settled in the neighborhood of North 
Creek church, and was called to ihe pasto- 
ral charge of said church, in which office 
lie continued until his death. 

Elder Ross was a man of exemplary mo- 
tility and piety, greyly beloved by his 
brethren and respected by all who knew 
him. He was a zealous minister of the 
gospel, and preached the doctrine he lived. 
For a man of his bodily infirmities he tra- 
velled and preached much, visiting most 
of the churches in the bounds of the Kehu- 
kee Association. His preaching was much 
approved by the churches, and his mild 
and courteous manner of delivery secured 
lor him the esteem of his hearers in gene- 
ral. In sentiment he was strictly predes- 
tinarian, and wholly depended for silva- 
tion by grace without the deeds of the law; 
which he stron^l}' urged from the pulpit, 
as well as in private conversation. He 
was strongly opposed to the missionary 
schemes of the day, and never for a mo- 
ment tolerated those measures, when they 
made some inroads into the Kehukee As* 
socboion. About two years before his 
death, he was afflicted with a cancer in the 
corner of his mouth, which greatly added 
to his other bodily infirmities, and which 
ultimately proved fatal. Yet in all his af* 
diction^, his meek and quiet spirit bore 
them with becoming Christian fortitude. 

Elder Ross was married to Nancy, daugh- 
ter of Eider John Bo wen, by whom he 



had live children, four of whom were liv- 
ytars utter nis connection vvitn tne ctiurcn, j . .,.. ... I , • . ,, hi * j 

{ , , r . . , ! nig at the time 01 his death. He departed 

he commenced tne exercise 01 ministerial ., ~ ,. P • r ,, , r , C,. . 

this life in the full triumphs of the Chris- 

bv all who 

n the 

yeai ot our Lord, 1835 
bors proved rather unsucesslu!, and strong J t , m , . , , ,.,. ,. . , ., 

"Blessed are the dead which die in the 

Lord, from henceforth; yea, saith the Spi- 
rit, that they may rest from their labors, 



mfts. Ihe time of his ordination is im-- 

7 4l , r :tian faith, greatly deplored 

known to the writer, but it annears lorj, u- xr i *t w» 

...... U . . . I knew him, rsovember the 16th, 

about six years of ms ministry, that his la-i r , , !ooie 



doubts were entertained by his brethren of 
his call to the ministry, or future useful? 
rjess to the church. Subsequent to this 
period, however, his qualifications for the 
ministry became more apparent, and his 
spiritual gifts shone with brighter iustte. 



and their works do follow them. : 



'4 ty-img -rrtss, 



3 



MINUTES 



OF TUB 



Kehukee Baptist •Association? 



HELD AT 



&KEWJ1RUEV MEETMJVG MOUSE, 
Martin County, 3JFV €>.• 

boriirntncing on Saturday before the first Sunday in October -, 154*. 



» 4 m » 



SATURDAY, 1st Oct. 1842. 
i. The Introductory Sermon was deliv- 
ered by Elder James Osbourn, (in ihe 
place of those that were appointed,) from 
Genesis, 43rd chapter, 9th verse: "I will 
be surety for him, of my hand shalt thou 
require him: if 1 bring him not unto thee, 
and set him before thee, then let me bear 
the blame forever." 

2. The delegates from the several chur- 
ches then assembled, and the x^ssociation 
was opened with prayer by Elder Blount 
Cooper, and proceeded to business; when 
Elder William Hyman was chosen Mode- 
rator, and Elder Joseph Biggs, Clerk; who 
(failed to his assistance brethren Joseph D. 
Biggs and R. M. G. Moore, as Assistant 
Clerks. 

3. Brethren in the ministry from sister 
Associations, (of the same faith and or- 
der,) were invited to seats with us; when 
Elders John Stadler, James Wilder, Par- 
ham Puckett, Mark Bennelt, and James 
Osbourn, seated themselves. 

4. Letters from thirty-five churches 
were handed in, and read, and the names 
of the delegates enrolled, and the represen- 
tation stated in the table of churches. 

5. Petitionary letters for membership in 
this Association were called for, when one 
from a church called Primitive Potecasi, 
Northampton county, was handed forward 
by her delegates, Thomas Joyner and A- 



braham Joyner; on satisfaction being giv- 
en of their being orthodox, it was received,- 
and manifested by the Moderator giving 
their delegate the right hand of fellowship. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister 
Associations were called for, when Elder's 
John Siadler and James Wilder, from 
Country Line; Parham Puckett, from 
White Oak; J. Leach, from Little River; 
and Mark Bennett, from Contentnea;* witJv 
copies of their Minutes, were' severally re- 
ceived and took seats with us; 

7. The following committees were' ap- 
pointed, viz: brethren James S. Battle arid 
William Gray, on finance; Elders James 
Osbourn, John Stadler, and Mark Ben- 
nett, to examine the Circular Letter; El- 
der Blount Cooper, to write to White Oak; 
brother James S. Battle, to Little River ; 
and Eider John H. Daniel to Contentnea 
Association. 

8. Satisfactory reports were made from 1 
the churches at Deep Creek, Frying Pan, 
Little Alligator, and Scuppernong, as re- 
quested last year. 

9. A biography of Elder Micajah Am- 
brose, was handed in by brother Charles 
Blount: which was read, and ordered to 
be attached to our Minutes. 

10. A biography of brother Richard 
Davis, was handed in by brother S. Clark; 
read, and ordered to be attached to our 
Minutes. 



Names of churches and 
. counties wherein 
situated. 



! Beargrass, Martin county, 
^Blouni'sCr'k^etfo/o^,— 

3 Conoho, Martin^ — 

4 Concord, Washington, — 

5 Conetoe, Edgecombe, 

6 C'owenjock, Currituck, 

7 Cross Roads, Edgecombe, 

8 Cedar Uland, Carteret, — 

9 Deep Creek, Halifax,-*?-] 
W Falls Tar River, Nash,— 

11 Flat Swamp, Pitt,— 

12 Flatty Creek, Pasquo'k, 

13 Frying Pan, Tyrrell, — 

14 Fishing Creekjlalifax,-} 

15 Great Swamp, Pitt, — 

16 Goose Creek, Beaufort,— 

17 Kehukee, Halifax, — 

18 Lawrence's mi hi Edge'e 

19 Little Alligator, Tyrrell,-] 

20 Morattock, Washington, - 

21 North Creek, Beaufort, - 

22 Picot mi hi Martin, — 

23 Powell's Point, Cwm'/fc,- 

24 Pungo, Beaufort, — 

25 Rocky Swamp, Halifax ~ 

26 Sap pony, Nash r 

27 Scuppernong, Tyrrell, — 

28 So. Mattamuskeet, Hyde, 

29 Sandy Grove, Nash, — 

30 Skewarkey, Martin, 

31 Sawyer's Creek, Camden- 

32 So. Quay, So'ampton, Via, 

33 Smith wick'sCr'k,A7ar/;« 

34 Sound Side, Tyrrell, — 

35 Spring Green, Martin, — 

36 Tarboro', Edgecombe, — 

37 Washington, Beaufort, — 

38 White Plains, Beaufort, 

39 Williams's m. h. Edg'e,- 

40 PrimitivePotecasi, iVo'/i,- 



t 



PASTORS & DELEGATES 



Wm. Whitaker, Abram Peal, 
Martin Ross,* Peter Dowty, 
Blount Cooper, John Bryan, 
Max'n Tatum,* Jno. Biggs,* 
John H. Dai?iel, Wm. Tnigpen 
Samuel Tatum,* 
Wm. Hyman, Sovereign Purvis, 
Thos. Robinson, George Styron,* 

Moses Joyner, Jos. S, Battle,* 
Wm t W. K t Philpot, Irvin Page, 
Hi A. Overman,* W. F. Banks,* 
Isaac Meekins,* David Cahoon,* 

Hardy Whiehard, A. Carney, 
James Potter, Robert Campain,* 
Asa Jones,* Turner Brewer, 
Joshua Lawrence,* John White, 

Wm. Gray, Charles Blount, 
Noah Gaskill, Thomas Barrow, 
Joshua Robinson, Clay'n Moore, 
Jas. Melson,* Simeon Sawyer, 
Samuel Clark, John R. Davis,* 
L. B. Bennett, H.W. Shearin,* 
Jordan Sherwood,* A. B. Bains, 
jr. Crawford Baker,* 

C , W . C arrowan, R . M . G . Moore 
Isaac Stricklin, Jas. M. Bains,* 
Joseph Biggs, Joseph Di Biggs 
John Lamb, JosephRrown,* 
E Harrison, JLawrenceJDarden 

IIUMPHREYvSTALLINGsDSingleton 

A.J, Swain, Wm- Ringgold, 
S. Outterbridge, Jno. Griffin, 
C. King, James S. Battle, 
Levin Wallace, Dan'l Wilkinson 
Jonathan Wallace, Ai V\ aters, 
David Bradley, Wm. Billups 
Thomas Joyner,* Abra'm Joyner, 



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NOTE, Pastors of churches and other ordained Ministers are in small capitals; unordainedf 
Ministers in italic,- those marked thus * were not present; from churches marked thusf we received:' 
no intelligence, in that case their number stands as last represented; dashes — denote no pastors; the 
column next to the last, shows the contributions from the churches to the Association fund this year; 
the last column shows the yearly meetings of each church. 



11. Elders James Osbourn, Parham ed the meeting by singing and prayer: El- 



Puckett, and John Stadler, (by private bal 
Jot,) were requested to occupy the stage in 
preaching on to-morrow, and that divine 
worship commence at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

The Association was adjourned with 
prayer- by the Moderator, until Monday 
next, 9 o'clock, A. M. 

SUNDAY, Oct. 2nd, 1S42. 

The brethren requested to occupy the 
stage by preaching to day, proceeded in 
the" following manner: EUcLtr Puckett open- 



der Stadler preached from Isaiah, 62nd 
chapter, 12 th verse: "And they shall call 
them, the holy people, the redeemed of 
the Lord: and thou shalt be called, sought 
out, a city not forsaken." Elder Osbourn 
preached from Zechanah, 6th chapter, 12th 
and 13th verses: ''And speak unto him, 
saying, thus speaketh the Lord of hosts, 
saying, behold the man whose name is the 
Branch; and he shall grow up out of his- 
place, and he shall build the temple of th®; 



Lord: Even he shall build the temple of 
the Lord; and he shall bear the glory, and 
shall sit and rule upon h's throne: and he 
shall be a priest upon his throne: and the 
counsel of peace shall be between them 
both." The weather was very favorable, 
and a large congregation assembled, who 
.appeared to be very attentive. 

MONDAY, Oct. 3rd, 1842. 
The Association was opened with pray- 
er by Elder John Stadler, and proceeded 
to business. 

12. The names of the delegates were 
^called, and those absent noted in the table 
of churches. 

13. On motion, the Rules of Decorum 
were read. 

14. The Minutes from the different As- 
sociations with whom we correspond, were 
^distributed to the delegates of this Associ- 
ation. 

15. The committees appointed on Sat- 
urday were now called on to report; when 
Elder Blount Cooper, who was appointed 
to write a letter of correspondence to the 
White Oak Association, handed in one, 
which was read, approved, and Elder John 
H. Daniel and brother Sovereign Purvis 



The Association concurred with the re- 
port. 

16. Resolved, that our next Association 
be held with the church at the Falls of 
Tar River, to commence on Saturday be- 
fore the first Sunday in October, 1843, 
and that Eider Humphrey Stallings be re 
quested to preich an Introductory Sermon; 
and in esse of failure, Elder Blount Coop- 
er — worship to commence at 11 o'clock. 

17. Elders William Hyman and John 
H. Daniel, and brethren Richard Harrison, 
Robert D. Hart, Lemuel B. Bennett, and 
James S. Battle, were appointed our dele- 
gates to the Country Line Association, and 
that they carry with them a file of our 
Minutes, say 20 copies. 

18. Resolved, that our Clerk be direct- 
ed to forward to the Abbott's Creek Union 
Association, a file of our Minutes, say 20 
copies. 

19. Resolved, that brother C. B Has- 
sell be requested to write a Circular Letter 
for our next Association. 

20. Resolved, that the letter and contri- 
bution from the church at Fishing Creek, 
be returned by Elder Cooper the bearer, 
and wilh a request that he should inform 
them the reason why their letter and con- 



appointed our messengers to bear the same, j tributjon ig nQt received that it is \ n C on- 
with a file of our last year s Minutes. El- nce of their g al , ing t0 i abor f or them 

der John H. Daniel, who was appointed to a minister of lhe missionary order-and 
write to the Contentnea Association, hand- st from them an explanation at our 



ed in one, which being read and approved, 
brethren C. B. Hassell and Robert D. 
Hart were appointed messengers to bear 
the same, with a file of our last year's Min- 
utes. Brother James S. Battle, who was 
appointed to write to the Little River As- 
sociation, handed in one, which being read 
and approved, brethren A. B. Bains, Jr. 
and Isaac Stricklin, were appointed our 
messengers to bear the same, with a file of 
our last year's Minutes. The committee 
appointed to examine the Circular Letter 
reported unfavorably to the letter receiv- 
ed, and on motion it was resolved, that 
said letter be returned to the writer. The 
committee of finance reported, that — 

There was in the hands of the Treasurer, at 
the close of last Association the sura of $19 11 

Received from the churches at this Associa- 
tion the sum of 47 05 



Paid for printing last year's Minutes, $25 
For transcribing, recording the Min- 
utes, &c. 15 



Now in the hands of the Treasurer, $56 16 



$96 
00 


16 


00 

— 40 00 



next Association. 

21. A biographical alt etch of the life of 
Elder Asa Sawyer, was handed in by El- 
der George W. Carrowan, which was read 
and ordered to be attached to our Minutes. 

22. Resolved, that Elder Joseph Biggs 
be requested to transcribe these Minutes 
for the press, &c. and that he have 700 co- 
pies printed and distributed as usual, and 
that he be paid $15 therefor. 

The Association then adjourned to the 
time and place appointed, with an exhorta- 
tion by the Moderator, and prayer by El- 
der James Osbourn. 

WILLIAM HYMAN.Mod'r. 
JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk. 

A BIOGRAPHY 

Of the Life of Elder Mica j ah Ambrose. 
Elder Micajah Ambrose was born in 
Tyrrell county, that part which jVins the 
lower part of Washington county, N. C in 
the month of November in the year 1769. 
His parents were very poor s^eople. conse- 
quently he was not in possession of such 



literiry acquirements as would (if combi- 
ned with his divine qualifications as a min- 
ister) have .rendered him popular, as a 
preacher, with the world. In his youth, 
or whilst growing up to manhood, he was 
not of that ela^s of >oung men who spend 
their time in frolicking and drinking of ar- 
dent spirits; but was sober, industrious, 
and prudent, of a mild disposition; and it 
was said by those who were acquainted 
with hirn that, if he was fond of any 
amusement, it was that of dancing. 

But it pleased God, about his twenty- 



second 



year, 



that he should "ret alarmed 



about bis future state; and like others that 
I have fc-nown, he flew to the law for a jus- 
tification before God; and in a short time 
he joined the Methodists, and became a 
class-leader among them. How long he 
remained with them is not precisely 
known, but it pleased God when he was 
about the age of twenty- nine, to discover to 
him the vileness of his heart, and that 
there is no justification by works. It was 
not long before he professed faith in Christ, 
and joined the church at Scuppernong, of 
which Elder Amariah Biggs was pastor, 
by whom he was baptised, it is supposed 
about the year 1S00. It was notlongt.hat 
he remained in this church, before he be- 
gan to exhort and pray publicly; and be- 
lieving that he had a call, on the 13th of 
July, 1805, he was recommended to the 
churches for the exercise of his gift, by 
said church, James Ambrose, Moderator, 
Amariah Biggs, Clerk. .Under this re- 
commendation from his church, he .continu- 
ed to preach wiih acc< ptance until June, 
1806. On the 8tlj day of said month, be- 
ing set apart, by prayer and fasting, he was 
ordained by Elders Amariah Biggs and 
Henry Rooten. 

He was not popular as a preacher with 
the world, but his brethren generally 1 be- 
Jieye loyed him, for he was a sound gospel 
preacher. His character as a private citi- 
zen, both in his neighborhood and as far as 
he was known, was excellent and without 
a flaw. For the last three or four years of 
his life he was greatly afflicted with the 
rheumatism, which prevented him from 
travelling from home; but he continued to 
preach to his church at Concord, up to Au- 
gust, 1840; after which, he never was able 
to go from home. He died on the 22nd of 
January, 1841, aged about 71 years. At 
Jlis death he was only pastor of the church 
,»t Concord. He left a wife -and eleven 
children to mourn their \os$. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH 
Qf brother Richard Davis ^ 

Who has "fought the good fight, he ha? 
finished his course, he has kept the farth,' 1 
and departed this life the 8th day of Sep- 
tember, 1842. He was born November 
10th, 177S, being in the 64th year of his 
age at the time of his death. 

It pleased God to quicken him and to 
shew rd m the exceeding sinfulness of sin, 
and what a sinner he was; and hpw it is 
that a just and holy God could save such a 
sinner. In or about the year 1808, being 
delivered by divine grace from the curse 
and condemnation of God's vengeful and 
fiery law, he soon after became a member 
of the New Light Baptist church, at North 
Creek, Beaufort county, and was baptise4 
by Elder John Bowen, at the head of Pun- 
go river, in his own neighborhood anq! 
among his own people, on or about the 
time aforesaid. He continued a member 
of North Creek church about fourteen 
years, that is, until about the year 1824; 
at or about which time, the church was 
constituted at the head of Pungo river, by 
Elders Green Carrowan and Lemuel Ross, 
in which brother Davis acted a zealous and 
faithful part, and was a member of that 
church at the day of his death. During 
which time God made him a care-taking, 
nursing father to the church, often in a 
public as well as in a private way, exerci? 
sing those spiritual gilts which God alone 
can give; until their monthly meeting in, 
June, 1839, when the church saw proper 
to extend his ptiyileges, and gave him lib? 
erty to preach in any of the adjoining 
churches; which he continued occasionally 
to do, oftentimes much to the comfort and 
edification of the church, until it pleased 
God to call him hence to receive that crown 
of righteousness wjiich the Lord the righr 
teous judge will give him at that day; and 
not to him only, but to all those who look 
and long lor his appearing, is the candid ber 
lief of the writer of this sketch. 

On the second Sunday in August, for he 
was unable to attend on Saturday, he prea- 
ched his last sermon from this text: A lit?- 
tie city and but few men in it was besieged 
by a great king, and a poor man delivered 
it, yet no man remembered that same poor 
man, &c. The sermon was delivered with 
much zeal and spirit, much to the satisfac- 
tion of the brethren; and he returned home 
under much affection. 

Truly it may be said, that a father if 



fallen in Israel, leaving a beloved compan- 
ion Peggy Davis, a professor of the same 
faith and order, with a number of children 
and other relatives to bemoan their loss- — 
but our loss is his gain, no doubt. 

BIOGRAPHY 

Of Elder Jisa Sawyer. 
Elder Asa Sawyer was born on Matta- 
muskeet Lake, in Hyde county, North 
Carolina, in the year 1791. In the year 
1813, he enlisted as a soldier in the army, 
^n the struggle with Great Britain; and af- 
ter peace was declared, he returned home 
greatly esteemed for his soldier-like de- 
portment and disposition, and was a great 
lover of American liberty and indepen- 
dence. In his youth he was wild and pro- 
fane, and so continued until the goodness 
and rnercy of God arrested him; and after 
he had a hope to believe in Je?us, he offer- 
ed for membership in the church at Matta- 
muskeet, and was baptised in July, 1S2S, 
hy Elder Enoch Brickhouse. He contin- 
ued a pious orderly member of the church 
&mti.l his death, and the following winter 



after he was baptised, he commenced prea- 
ching the gospel; which being accepted by 
the church, he was on the first Saturday in 
December, 1831, set apart and ordained to 
the ministration of go°pel ordinances by 
Elders John Richardson and Lemuel Ross; 
and was then called to take the pastoral 
care of North Mattamuskeet ehurch, and 
continued so until his death. 

During his ministry he attended several 
churches, and was greatly beloved and es- 
teemed by his brethren. He was more of 
an experimental than doctrinal preacher, 
and we think his labors were blessed of the 
Lord, both in the comforting the children 
of God, and in the alarming and convicting 
of sinners. He was a man of great piety, 
and his walk was orderly and exemplary. 

Elder Sawyer was married to Judith 
Sawyer in June, 1815, and left' at his de.ith 
his wife and three children, all of whom 
were daughters. He departed this life in 
the triumph of faith, ,on the 7th IVIay, 
1S35, with full assurance of obtaining the 
crown of never-fading glory at God's right 
hand, in heaven above. 

Tarhoro' Presst 



fp 



3\ 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



Kehukee Baptist Jlssociation, 



HELD AT 



Tke Falls of Tar River, Nash County, N. C. 

Commencing Saturday before the 1st Sunday in October, 1S43. 



SATURDAY, Sept. 30th, 1843. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was de'iv- 
ered hy Elder Blount Cooper, from Mat- 
thew, 28th chap. 19th and 20th verses: 
*'Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, 
baptizing them in the name of the Father, 
and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost; 
20. Teaching them to observe all things 
whatsoever I have commanded you: and 
lo, I am with you always, even unto the 
end of the world. Amen." 

2. The delegates from the several chur- 
ches then assembled, and the Association 
was opened with prayer by Elder William 
Hyman, and proceeded to business; when 
Elder William Hyman was chosen Mode- 
rator, and brother Joseph D. Biggs, Clerk, 
who called to his assistance brother C. B. 
Hasscll. 

3. Brethren in the ministry from sister 
Associations, (of the same faith and order,) 
were invited to seats with us; when El- 
ders, John Stadler, Jesse Adams, James 
Wilder, Farham Puckett, D J. Mott, Jas. 
Osbourn, Josiah Smith, and William Bass, 
seated themselves. 

4. Let ers from thirty churches were 
handed in and read, and the names of the 
delegates enrolled, and the representation 
staled in the table of churches. 

5. Petitionary letters for membership in 
this Association were called for. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister 
Associations were called for, when Elder 
Jesse Adams handed in a file of Minutes 
from Little River; Elders John Stadler 
and James Wilder, Minutes from Country 



Line and Abbott's Creek Union; Elder 
• William Bass, Minutes from Contentnea; 
and Elders Josiah Smith, P. Puckett, and 
D. J. Mott, Minutes from White Oak, As- 
socia'ions. 

7. The following committees were ap- 
pointed, (viz:) brethren James S Battle 
and Joseph S. Battle, on finance. Elders, 
James Osbourn, John Stadler, and Jesse 
Adams, and the writer, to examine the- 
Circular Letter. 

8. On motion, agreed that we corres- 
pond by letter and delegates with the fol- 
lowing Associations, viz: White Oak, Con- 
lentnea, and Little River. Brother J. D. 
Biggs was appointed to write to White 
Oak, Elder B. Cooper to Contentnea, and 
Elder J. H. Daniel to Little River, Associ- 
ations. 

9. On motion, agreed that brother A. 
B. Bains, Jr. be requested to prepare a Bi« 
ography of Elder Jordan Sherrod, dec'd, 
by the next Association. 

10. A Biography of Elder Joshua Law- 
rence was handed forward, and a commit- 
tee consisting of Elder Blount Cooper, and 
brethren, James S. Battle, Richard Harri- 
son, and Jos ph D Biggs, were appointed 

o examine the same and report on Mond ty. 

1 1. EMers, Osbourn, Stadler, and Wil- 
der, were requested by private ballot to 
occupy the stage on to-morrow in preach- 
ing, and that divine worship commence at 
10 o'clock, A. M. 

The Association was then adjourned un- 
til Monday next 9 o'clock, A. M. by Elder 
James Wilder. 



Names of churches and 

counties wherein 

situated. 



1 Beargra3s, Martin county, 

2 Blount'sCr'k,Z?e«u/b/^,-t 

3 Conoho, Martin, — 

4 Concord, Washington ,—\ 

5 Conetoe, Edgecombe, \ 

6 Cowenjock, Currituck, 

7 Cross Roads, Edgecombe, 

8 Cedar Island, Carteret, — 

9 Deep Creek, Halifax, — f 

10 Falls Tar River, Nash,— 

11 Flat Swamp, Pitt,— 

19 Flatty Creek, Pasquofk,- 

13 Frying Pan, Tyrrell, — j 

14 Fishing Creek, Halifax, 

15 Great Swamp, Pitt, — 

16 Goose Creek, Beaufort,-] 

17 Joyner's, Northampton, - 

18 Kehukee, Halifax, — 

19 Lawrence's, Edgtcombe,- 
26 Little Alligator, Tyrrell-] 

21 Morattock, Washingtoa,- 

22 North Creek, Beaufort,— 

23 Picot. Martin, — f 

24 Powell's Point, CuSk,-] 

25 Pungo, Beau j mi, — 

26 Rocky Swamp, Halifax, 

27 Sappony, Nash, — 

28 Scuppernong, Tyrrell, — f 

29 So. Mattamuskeet, Hyde, 

30 Sandy Grove, Nash, — f 

31 Skewarkey, Martin, 

32 Sawyer's Cr'k, Camden,- 

33 So. Quay, So'ampton, Pa. 

34 Smithwiek'sCr'k,Mzr'/?- 

35 Sound Side, Tyrrell, — 

36 Spring Green, Martin, — 

37 Tarboro', Edgecombe, — 

38 Washingten, Beaufort, — 

39 White Plains, Beaufort, 

40 WillLams's, Edgecombe,- 



PASTORS & DELEGATES. 



Wmi Whitaker, Abram Peal, 

Blount Cooper, Ni F. Hooker, 
Max'm Tatum, Jesse Sawyer,*! 
John H. Daniel, Wm.Thigpen,*! 
Samuel Tatum,* 
Wm. Hyman, Sovereign Purvis, 
Thos. Robinson, Thos. Goodwin, 

Joseph S. Battle, JamesS. Battle, 
W. W. K. Philpot* Irvin Page, 1 
D.B, Pendleton,* H. A. Overman* 

Willie Powell, Jethro Parker,*i 
Absalom Carney,* H.Whichard,| 



Pho's Joyner, Abraham Joyner, 1 
General Young, Tur'r Brewer,*! «*> 
Rich'd Harrison, Arthur Parker, 2 



b* fcr 


Pi 




^ 


ft 








o 


5? 


«tf 


& 


eft* 



1 2 



Wm. Gray,* W. W. Mizell, 
Noah Gaskill,* Joseph FLClark 



Samuel Clark, John R. Davis,* 
L. B. Bennett, Step'n Nickels, 
A. B. Bains, Jr. Elzy Taylor, 

GW.CARROWAN,*A.B.Swindell, 
[sell, 
IosiBiggs, J.DiBiggs, C.B.Has- 
Tohn Lamb, Joseph Brown,* 
Ei Harrison, Elisha Darden, 
David Singleton, John Hedges,* 
Samuel Rogers, 

Jno. Griffin, Ste'n Outterbridge, 
Coffield King, James Ellinor, 
Levin Wallace,* Dan'l Wilkinson 
Jonathan Wallace, Li Ozbnrn, 
David Bradley, Wm. Billups,* 



2 
2 1 



£1 b0 



s*| ?- 



92 6 24 



3 24 



rl 



-6S - 



22 



$ Cts 



75 



1 00 
1 00 
1 50 
1 00 
32j 1 00 
24 1 50 



2 00 

1 00 

2 00 



Yearly 
meetings, 
Sunday & 
Saturday 

before. 



351 1 00 

581 1 00 



20 

122 

56 

82 
39 



51304 38 05 



1 00 

75 

1 50 

1 50 
1 50 



1 25 
1 00 

1 00 

2 30 



[3d inAug. 
r 3d in Mar. 

1st inSep. 

4th inSep. 

3d in Sep. 

3d in Mar. 

2d in Sep. 



2d in Sep i 
1st inSep, 
2d inNov. 

4th in Sep 
3d in Sep. 
3d inAug. 

4th inAug 



4th inAug 
3d inAug. 
2d in Jam 
2d inAug. 
3d inAug. 
1st inSep. 

IstinSep, 
2d in Oct. 
2d in Augi 

IstinJune 
4th inAug 

4th in Sep. 
IstinAug-, 
IstinAug. 

3d -inAuffi'"- - 



NOTE. Pastors of churches and other ordainei Ministers are in small capitals; unordained 
Ministers in italic,- those marked thus * were not present; from churches marked thus f w© received 
no intelligence, in that case their number stands as last represented; dashes — denote no pastors; 
the column before the last, shows the contributions from the churches to the Association fund this 
year; the last column shows the yearly meetings of each church. 



SUNDAY, Oct. 1. 
The brethren requested to oecupy the 
stage this day, opened divine worship by 
Elder James Osbourn preaching from St. 
John, 15th chap, and 26'h verse: "But 
when the Comforter is come, whom 1 will 
send unto you from the Father, even the 
Spirit of truth, which proceedeth from the 
Father, he shall testify of me. Elder 
J mes Wilder preached from 5th chap, of 
Snd Corinthians and 20ih verse: "Now 
then we are ambassadors for Christ, as tho' 
God did beseech you by us: we pray you 



in Christ's stead, be ye reconciled to 
(lod." Elder John Stadler closed and 
preached from Jeremiah, 6th chap, and 
part of the 16th verse: ''Thus saiih the 
Lord, Stand ye in the ways, and see and 
ask for the old paths, where is the good 
way, and walk therein, and ye shall find 
rest for your souls " A large congrega- 
tion were in attendance, and we hope many 
heard with the interior eye of their under- 
standing, and glorified God for another ex- 
hibition of divine truth. 



3 



MONDAY, Oct. 2. 
The Association assembled, and was 
opened with prayer by Elder Blount 
Cooper. 

12. The names of the delegates to this 
Association were called over, and those 
absent marked as such in the table of 
churches. 

13. Elder Burwell Temple, from the 
Little River Association, appeared and took 
a seat with us 

14. The Minutes received from the dif- 
ferent Associations with whom we corres- 
pond, were distributed to the delegates. 

15 Elders, Parham Puckett and Bur 
well Temple were requested to occupy the 
stage this day by preaching. 

16. The committees appointed on Satur- 
day were now called on to repor' ; when 
Elder Blount Cooper, who was appointed 
to write to the Contentnea Association, 
handed forward a letter, which was read, 
approved, and Elders, William Hymanand 
John H. Daniel, and bro. .lames Ellinor, 
were appointed our messengers to bear the 
same, with a file of our last year's Min- 
utes. 

17 Elder JoTin H. Daniel handed in a 
letter to the Little River Association; 
which was read, approved, and brethren, 
A B. Bains, Jr. and James Ellinor, were 
appointed our messeng"rs to bear the same 
with a file of our Minutes. 

18. Brother J. D Bi«;gs, who was ap 
pojtTfced to write to the White Oak Associa- 
tion,' handed in a letter; which was read 
and approved, and Elders, Edwin Harri- 
son and Blount Cooper, and brethren, 
Sovereign Purvis and N. F. Hooker, were 
appointed our messengers to bear the same 
with a file of our Minutes. 

19. Resolved, That our next Association 
beheld with the church at Kehukee, Hali- 
fax county, to commence on Saturday be- 
fore the first Sunday in October, 1844; and 
that Eider Edwin Harrison be requested 
to preach an Introductory Sermon, and in 
case of failure. Elder John H. Daniel: wor- 
ship to commence at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

20. Resolved, That Elders, Blount 
Cooper and William Hyman, and breth- 
ren, James Ellinor and Joseph D. B ; ggs, 
be appointed our messengers to the Coun- 
try Line Association and that they carry 
25 copies of our Minutes. 

21 Resolved, That the Clerk be direct- 
ed to forward to the Abboit's Creek Union 
Association 25 copies of our Minutes. 

22. The committee appointed to exam- 



ine the Circular Letter, reported, that they 
had done so, and recommend its reading; 
which was done and approved, and order- 
ed to be attached to these Minutes. 

23. The committee appointed to exam- 
ine the Biography of Elder Joshua Law- 
aence. reported, that they had done so, and 
recommend the reading of it in the Asso- 
ciation; which was accordingly done, and 
ordered to be attached to these Minutes. 

24 The committee of Finance report- 
ed, that — 

There was in the hands of the Treasurer, at 
the close of last Association, the sum of $56 15 

Paid for printing the Minutes of 

last year, - $30 00 

For superintending the printing, 
and distributer the Minutes 
of last year, » 15 00 

45 00 

Now in the hands of the Treasurer, $11 15 
Received in contributions from the church- 
es at this Association, - 38 05 

Making $49 20 

The Association concurred in the report. 

25. Elder Blount Cooper was appointed 
to write a Circular Letter for the next As- 
sociation, and to select his subject, and call 

i to his assistance any one whom he may 
j think proper. 

26. Resolved, that bro. Joseph D. Biggs 
| be requested to prepare these Minutes for 

the press, superintend the printing thereof, 
and have 800 copies struck; and that he be 
allowed $10 for his services. 

27. On motion, agreed, that we set apart 
a day of f.is'ing and prayer, to be observed 
by the churches throughout our bounds — 
that God Almighty would visit us in our 
destitute situation, and cajse a revival of 
pure and undefined religion in the hearts of 
his people; and that the last Saturday in 
November be designated as the day. 

28. On motion, agreed that bro. C. B. 
Hassell be requested to write a letter to the 
committee appointed by the Chowan Asso- 
ciation, who communicated with us last 
year, on the subject of appointing delegates 
to confer with delegates appointed by that 
body on the subject of reviving a corres- 
pondence between the two Associations, 
rendering to them the reason of our refusal 
to do so; and that the same be examined 
by a committee consisting of Elder Wil- 
liam Hymanand bro .lames S. Rattle, and 
if approved, 10 be signed by the Modera- 
tor and Clerk. 

29. Inasmuch as we are in the habit of 
corresponding wi'h other Associations by 
letter and delegates, and believing it to b« 



unauthorized by the word of God that we 
should send such messengers at their own 
charges: Resolved, that in future we re- 
commend it as a matter of consideration to 
the churches composing this Association, 
and request them in future to increase 
their contributions, and specify in their re 
turns the amount sent to defray the ex- 
penses of the Association; and also the 
amount sent to aid in defraying the expen- 
ses of our delegates to corresponding Asso- 
ciations. 

30 On motion, the following preamble 
and resolution were adopted: — 

Whereas, in our opinion singing is part 
of the worship of God, and t h* j t e appears to 
be in use among our churches and brethren 
no one collection of Hymns, and Spiritual 
Songs, sufficiently adapted to both public 
and private worship, and at the same time 
congenial throughout with the sentiments 
of God's peculiar people, therefore 

Resolved, that in the opinion of this As- 
sociation such a deficiency ought to be sup 
plied, and to that end we do recommend 
Eider James Osbourn, of Baltimore, who 
is in the habit of getting works through 
the press, and in whose evangelical senti- 
ments we have the utmost reliance, to pre- 
pare a Selection of Hymns, on his own 
responsibility, however, from the various 
collections now in use amongst Old School 
Baptists, such aw he may deem sufficiently 
comprehensive, to form an acceptable 
Hymn Book, for the use of the churches 
of this Association, as well as all others of 
like faith and order throughout our State 
and country. And provided, Elder Os- 
bourne wiil prepare such a collection, em- 
bracing about 5 or 600 hymns, and can af- 
ford them at about 62^ cents a piece, then 
we would cordially lecommend the same 
to the patronage of our churches. 

The Association then adjourned to the 
time and place appointed, with an exhorta- 
tion bv the Moderator, and prayer by El- 
der Edwin Harrison 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Mod'r. 
Jos. D. Biggs, Clerk. 



CIRCULAR LETTER, 

"Put on the whole armor of God. " Eph. 

vi 11 
The members of the Kehakee .Association 

to the churches they represent, sendeth 

Greeting. 

Dearly belotkd Brethren: In view 



of the fiery trial, through which we be- 
lieve you will presently have to pass; we 
have thought proper to address you on the 
present occasion, by way of exhortation 
and encouragement: and that you may be 
the better prepared to stand against the 
wiles of the devil and pass unscathed the 
trying scene; we say in the language of 
the great apostle to the Gentiles, vvhile ad- 
dressing the brethren at Ephesus, "Put on 
the whole armor of God " 

H is quite apparent, brethren, that, that 
which has been once done must be done 
again, — that a repeated and continual per- 
severance must be adhered to, by the faith- 
ful in Christ Jesus, in order to beat off the 
never ceasing waves of error and confusion, 
that dash th«ir boisterous sides against the 
citadel of eternal truth. 

The poor of the flock who have made up 
the scattered churches of the Kehukee As- 
sociation, within the last fottv years have 
undergone trials of a thrilling character, 
and passed through scenes well calculated 
to try men's souls 

Within the recollection of nearly all the 
younger brethren even, the voice of dis- 
cord and the storms of angry debate hath 
been heard within our borders; and the 
enemies of an evangelical faiih have endea- 
vored to transform the glory and beautv of 
our order, into the similitude of an earthly 
policy; whereby human pride might be 
aggrandized and a tyrannical priesthood es- 
tablished. These efforts were persevered 
in, wiih a ze;d worthy of a b< tter cause, 
until some bold defenders of the faith were 
called into action— stemmed the tide of 
popular fury, lifted up their voices like 
trumpets, and blew the alarm blasts from 
Zion's holy hill, and encouraged the Asso- 
ciation to declare a separation from all such 
religious traffic; which she did 

The hand of God was visible in the righ- 
teous decision; peace and tranquility hath 
followed in its wake, and the God of peace 
hath dwelt among his people 

But such must not always be the case. 
The sword of the Almighty must again be 
bathed in heaven. Trials and temptations 
await God's dear children, and through 
much tribulation it is that they must enter 
into the kingdom. The clouds now are 
once more visible in the horizon — the cha- 
riot wheels of Ah;ib rattle on the plains; — 
the voice of Jezebel rs heard above the 
storm wind, and the prophets of the Lord 
<Jod cast about for safety. But were all 
the faithful supposed to be destroyed by 



4 

tAtQ worshippers, except one, whose life 'the besom of destruction. 

was hunted l«ke a partridge on the rnoun 

Tains; when th^re were even theu 7000 

who had not bowed the km : e to the image- 

of Baal? — even so now at this present 

time also, ther* ** a remnant according to 

the election of grace: and if by grace then 

iris no more works, otherwise grace is no 



We are fully persuaded, brethren, that a 
battle* is immediately to bw mij&ht bfctweea 
Old School and New oa the ground claim- 
ed by churches of" the Rehuliee : isneit- 
tion, such as shall make the ears tingle of 
til those who hear of it. The New School 
Baptists suppose that our (trmfnish i oum- 



ts upon 
'alas, how manv 



more grace. And there, is at least, *ejh^rsand resources of an earthly nature, to 
1hink, one or more who stand like senii- I be an indication that God has forsaken lis, 
nets uoon the watch towers of Ziom But | and Vw ill grant unto them the victory, ou 

account of (heir superior numbers, litera* 
lure and wealth. Npither he ye surcrtsed, 
brethien, if amidst 'he heat of the eVgage* 
meat, some among your ownselves s ould 
aho arise, here and there, to strehgtftea 
the hands of the enemy. But remember, 
the race is not to the swift, nor the hsule 
to the strong, for victories and vengeance 
belongeth unto God: and the truth or suc- 
cess of no cause depends upon the entire in- 
tegrity of all those who at first st* p tor- 
ward in defence of it Did the treason of 
Arnold, either defeat the success of ? he A- 
merican Revolution —prove (he on ighte- 
ousness of the cause of our forefather"*, or 



are there, and where are ! 
Ihey to be found? One after another we 
have seen them passing off the stage of ac 
tion Some venerable soldiers of the cross 
have already fallen asleep — others, nearly 
inactive by old age are ripening for the 
tomb, and a few are leaving us to preach 
the gospel in distant quarters of the Lord's 
vineyard. 

Where are ihe prophets of the Lord? 
Only here and there is a regularly ordain- 
ed minister of the gospel lo be found, with- 
in the bounds of the Kehukee Association 
Few and far between are the visits of these 
ftngels of the churches to the flocks, over 
the which the Holy -Miost hath made them 
overseers: and but few people are quitting 
their hold on the carnal pleasures and spi- 
ritual wickedness of this world's ways, and 
uniting themselves with the churches. 
This is the picture, brethren; and this as 
the naked truth, we are neither ashamed 
iior afraid to acknowledge. 

In the meantime the forces of Jezebel are 
advancing, and the generation of lahmael 
ites are multiplying against us. Already 
has the standard of theenem) been raised 
within our borders, and the threat of the 
conquerer gone forth —saying, we must 
either bow down in conformity to their 
mandates, or be "drivea from one end of 
our bounds to the other." The time, and 
that not far off. is already designated, when 



induce a v ashington 10 sheath his sword 
in despair? N*y verily, but it serv>d to 
nerve anew their arms to the conflict, and 
redouhle their diligence 

Or did the Ephesian church eo r wtude, 
that the eternal base of Christianity wa» no- 
thing but a phantom —that God wfcs unable 
to defend his own cause or protect his peo- 
ple: -did «he Old School Predestn arian 
Baptists at Ephesus, we ask. turn pate thro* 
fear, throw clown their shields ami run 
away, because Paul said to them, **Aiso of 
your own*elve* shall men arise, speaking 
perverse things to draw away disciple* af- 
ter them"? Nay, verily, but they as s bo- 
dy adhered to the injunction of the apostle* 
k< Pui on the whole armor of God," remem- 
bering that the beloved apostle, had not- 



such an oddity as an Old School Baptist is I ceased to warn them of approaching dam 
not to be found in the land; and according 'ger, nigh? and day with tears ior the space 
to the wisdom of theological schools and j of thre* years. 

The apostle Paul had labored long -nd 
hard wiih the few poor ones at Ep^us, 

: .,d a 
ee -ne 
,» he 
; -vopo- 



the prophecies of a hireling priesthood, our 
days are already numbered 

Men-made ministers, encouraged by the j and had been to them like a bathe- 
number of their converts, and the money I brother. He had there baldly i = n a 
of the fascinated multitude, no longer in- empire of - darkness, and ; atiac* 
tend to hover around the borders of our ^strongholds of satan in that great m 
camp, and simply hurl thrir Paithian ar- lis of Asia Hi* doctrine had pereire.ied 
rows at us as they fly; but they are now j the chambers ot the temple, and tie priestij 
determined to bear down upon us in good j aud craftsmen ralhed sk wit: the vciv.^ of 
earnest and thai speedih \ sword and bayo many waters, to the reset'* f he g,io • ,nd 
net in hand, and with thesr big guns well honor of too great goddess U •"■■*. <:wm 
nsojinted; to sweep all before them as with j they declared all Asia and the world we"f- 



shipped; but yet whose temple was" likely 
to be despised, and whose magnificence tt, 
be destroyed, by the preaching of thi 
Paul; — and also by the same moans their 
craft was in danger to be set at nought. 
Paui, ihen. in view of 'heir future trials, 
yet remembering the steadfastness of their 
faith: after having been so long with the 
bre'hren in Eptusian Babylon, had a right 
to pay and did say, k T know this, that alter 
my departure shall grievous wolves enter 
in among you, not sparing the flock " But 
said he afterwards to them in a letter, "my 
brethn n, be strong in the Lord and in the 
powe» of his might"-— ''For we wnstle not 
against flesh and bl©od, bat against princi- 
pali*.iV«», against powers, against the rulers 
of the darkness of this world, against spi- 
ritual -vickeuness in bt^h places Where- 
fore, take unto you the whole armor of\ in sackcloth, who went forth to battle f% 
God. that ye may be able to stand in the their deliverance, — the allied nations of Ju- 
evi< day, and having done all to Stand. ' dea ? s king — his brethren beyond the Eu- 
Stand therefore, having your loin3 girt phrates — or the ''broken reed of Rgvpt'V 



does it require fo chase a thowsamf, or pnt, 
ten thousand to flight? Let t! e word < f 
God answer — one to chase a thousand, ami 
/?vo to put ten thousand to flight Ami. 
when the multitude of the Mid-hmites werex. 
to be destroyed, how many did God call 
forth for that purpose from amongst the 
ranks of the Hebrews; — an innurru Table? 
host, or a little band of 300 men onlvf 
who without an earthly weapon, but v.i?b 
the watch- word in their mouth, "The 
sword of the Lord and of Gideon" — saw 
their enemies full before them and flee as- 
from destruction, heing confounded and 
overthrown by the determinate counsel 
and strong ham! of rhe most high God. 

VVhen th<< ^yrhuis piirhed ;heir K ms be-. 
fore the w.dls of Jerusalem, while ll< zeki- 
r.h and his people clothed th* m*elv< if 



about with truth, and having on the breast- 
plate of righteousness; and your feet shod 



No. Bt, y t an angel was commissioned from 
heaven to destroy 185,000 of that prodi- 



wiih the preparation of the gospel of peace; ; gious host, and drive back the remainder 



above all taking the shield of Faith, 
wherewith ye shall be able to quench all 
the fiery daits of the wicked. And take 



with fear and trembling into their own do- 
minions. 

What was the honor and where was the. 



the helmet of salvation and the sword of ! victory of Nebuchadnezzar, with ;b< j glory 

" ! of his 120 provinces, over three Hebrew 
children, whom he had cast into 'he fur- 
nace heated seven times hotter than usual,, 
because they would not fall down and wor- 
ship the image, he had set up in the plains 
of Dura? (About a fair match for the great 
image now erected by Nebuchadnezzar's 
successor, called Benevolence. aV\»s human, 
effort, alias free will, alias the ivorld's. 
conversion, before which the children of 
faithful Abraham are called upon to fall 
di>w-n and worship ) Answer. One 'like 
the Son of God" walked with them there — 
the fire touched not even the herders of 
their garments— the smell of fire was not- 
on them; but altogether unscathed they 
passed through the furnace and came forih, 
to the confusion of their tyrannical mon- 
arch and the overthrow of their enemies^, 
for the fire leaped forth and overwhelmed 
those who had caused its kindling. 

Who killed Goliah; the tantalizer, the. 
scoffer, the railer, and tie dot of the armios 
of Israel? Answer. The stripling son of 
Jesse, marching fofth in the name of the 
Lord God of hosts v with a smooth stone,, 
from the bri WM — just as it Came, from the 



the spirit, which is the word of God." ! 
And beloved brethren of the Kehukce 
faith, thus standing;, thus girt about, breast- 
plate^, shod, shielded, helme-ted, and 
8 wonted, do we now most earnestly exhort 
you to be — and pray God Almighty that 
you may be; in order that hi3 truth may be 
main'sned, by at least a few, surrounded by 
the i* eruptions that are covering the earth 
like a deluge; and that his Zion may shine 
brighter and his grea? name be glorified. 

Do you say we are not able to meet the 
Amaiekites and the tail Ana kirns — that we 
are a few and a feeble flock, incompetent to 
battle? — 'hen we answer, ye are able, 
while standing in the strength of the Al- 
mighty Remember the Holy Ghost hath 
said, "I will never leave thee nor forsake 
thee " And further; *M od hath chosen the 
foolish things of the world to confound the 
Wise-; md God hath chosen the weak things 
of the world to confound the things that 
are mighty, &c." And why?— "that no 
flesh should glory in hitf presence." And 
moreover, Christ hath said, "Fear not, lit 
tie flock, for it is your Father's good plea 
sure to give you 'he kingdom 



And we would ask, whe>n panoplied for ; hands of its creator- - wi.s enabled by the- 
Avar by the spiritof the Almighty, how many {unerring spirit of the Almighty, to strifce 



a&ar] i'e haughty giant — cut off his head 
with his oivn sword; and thereby bring 
deliverance to die people of God. 

And when 400 prophets of Baal were 
destroyed at the brook Kedron; we ask, 
how rrjun v prophets of the true God were 
there to accomplish it? Answer. One; 
and he the feeble old man who had recent- 
ly fled from the fury of these same dogs 
and their master, and whose life had been 
hunted by them from country to country. 
Hut the set time to favor Zion had at length 
arrived; the Almighty made bare his arm 
in a -powerful and miraculous manner; — 
Elijah now stood forth at. the command of 
God, as bold as a lion and as powerful as a 
prine; :~the miracle darted conviction to 
the hevTts of the admiring multitude — con- 
version followed, and an apostatizing peo- 
ple « ere restored to the religion of their 
fathers, saying, "The Lord he is the God, 
the Lord he is the God" — and at the same 
time willing to aid in meting out the re- 
ward justly due to a lying priesthood; 
which was death 

In view of these and like examples, 
brethren, what hare you to fear? Do you 
ever expect to find the furnace hotter—the 
Odds greater, or circumstances more unfa- 
vorable to the natural eye, than has been 
exhibited in the few instances above allu- 
ded to? All human or satanie opposition 
to if): purposes of God, the doctrine of his 
gospel, and the teachings of his spirit — all 
their noise and array, all their bombast, 
threats, parade and show, will vanish be- 
fore the breath of the Almighty, like tow 
before the devouring flame: and as sure 
as God exists, oblivious destruction awaits 
the measures of the puffed up workmon- 
gers, Ashdods, Ishmaeiites, and Hagarenes 
of the present day; similar to the casting of 
a millstone into the waters of the mighty 
ocean. 

Hut you have first to endure the bitter 
conflict. Fresh courage take from the 
promises of your leader, who has declared 
he will be with you alway even to the end. 
He never mad© a compromise with 3atan or 
the Pharisees. He uniformly denounced 
their wickedness and hypocrisy. And al- 
though they took him and nailed him to the 
Roman cross, wagging^hesr heads— and re- 
joicing over their fancied victory; yet he 
rolled back confusion on their heads, burst 
the bars of death, rose a mightv conqueror 
over death, hell and the grave, and entered 
tpe everlasting gates of felicity as the con 
tyiering king of glory. Even so Shall all 



Those who are in Christ .lesus, come off 
more than conquerors at last, through him 
who died for their offences and rose again 
for their justification. Ye feeble and scat* 
tered soldiers of the cross, then nerve your 
arms to the contest: endure hardness as 
good soldiers and as seeing him who is in- 
visible, "Put on the whole armor of God," 
and fear not the wrath or the weapons of 
man. 

Remember you are fighting in a righte- 
ous cause; and while denouncing toe er- 
rors of doctrines and practices that now so 
generally prevail in the land, you are side, 
by side with the founder of Christianity 
and his immediate disciples. You are with 
the church in the wilderness, who would 
have no fellowship with the beast, or re- 
ceive his mark in her forehead, during <he 
long night of papal darkness. You are al- 
so with sorne of the Reformers, who pro- 
tested against the corruptions of the Ro- 
mish church, and entered into covenants for 
the more pure worship of the Almighty. 
Turn to the articles of faith belonging to 
the Regular Baptists of England and Ame- 
rica, of two or 300 years standing, and you 
will find them breathing the same senti- 
ments as those adopted by the Kehukeo 
Association, and for which we are now- 
contending Their creed was drawn up 
when the worship of God was more pure, 
the minds of men more enlightened by his 
Spirit, and their hearts more warm and bur- 
ning with indignation against the kingdom 
of antichrist, than many of the present day. 
Jind it is only the repudi<jtors of their 
j own artic/es. the mere eaters up of their 
own words, the wise above that which is 
\ written* the workmongers and mo ey 
j beggars, those who desire to make mer- 
| chandize of the gospel and traffic in the 
i souls of men — in a wdrd, it is onfy the 
j New School Party, who now cut such 
j a flourish among those called Baptists, 
that are endeavoring to render powerless 
or abolish their own creed; and whirl, 
wheedle, coax or drive the minority — thosti 
who remain steadfast in the faith and ad- 
] here to their principles) — into thrir new 
; measures of extravagance and folly. These 
I are the New School gentry, who ar t03 
| proud to work but to bpg they s? em not 
| ashamed, with whom we have to contend. 

These are the fine, gentlemen too, who 
I imagine to themselves that they monopo- 
I lize toe learning and philosophy of the age, 
j and that wisdom surely will die with them. 
I They look down from their imaginary high 



places of abode with scorn and* contemp? 
Upon the plain unsophisticated follower of 
jesus, who is enquiring for the old paths 
and the good »vay that he may walk there- 
in; and call him a "heathen,''' ah "ignora 
mus," a poor illiterate wretch* a super- 
stitious, bigoted, and hide-bound semi- 
barbarian, who is altogether unfit to live. 
And gnashing their teelh against him as did 
the murderers of Stephen, they of course 
try to kill off h:s usefulness and reputation 
In the land. 

Brethren, we say onward and still on- 
ward let your march b?, have no fellow 
ship whatever with the unfruitful works of 
darkness, "Put on the whole armor of 
God." and contend earnestly for the faith 
once delivered to the saints, even though 
your lives should pay the forfeit. Ves, 
we repeat, 

'"Soldiers of the cross, arise! 
Lo! your Captain, from the skies, 
Holding' forth the glittering prize, 
Calls to victory: 
. Fear not, though the battle lower, 
Firmly stand the trying hour; 
Stand the tempter's utmost power, 
Spurn his slavery. 

Who the cause of Christ would yield! 
Who would leave the battle field? 
Who would castaway his shield? 

Let him basely go: 
Who for Zion's King will stand] 
Who will join the faithful band? 
Let him come with heart and hand, 

Let him face the foe. 

By the mercies of our God! 
By Emanuel's streaming blood, 
When alone for us he stood, 

Ne'er "give up the strife: 
Ever to the latest breath, 
Hark to what your daptain saith; 
*Be thou jaithful unto death} 
Take tht crevjn of It'feS " 

And now, brethren, we commend you 
to God and the word of his grace, which is 
able to build you up, and to give you an 
inheritance among all them which are sanc- 
tified Amen. 

BIGORAPHF OF 

ELDER JOSHUA LAWRENCE. 

The language of obituary is too often 
*ih*i of empty panegyric or unmerited eu- 
logy; but all who knew she subject of the 
ib)i0win£ sketch, will accord in she senti- 
roern. fhat he was no common man: and 
•*ye regret, that our limits and ability forbid 
oyr rfoinji justice 10 she memory of one who 
©ecypierj go prominent a place among man- 
fc.tndj but as he was known (by character; 



8 

if not personally,) by all to whom fhefcfe" 
presents shall come, a biography of unusual 
length might seem superfluous and uncalled 
for. 

According io information which may be 
relieJ on, Joshua Lawrence w*x born the; 
10th day of September, 1778, on Deep 
Creek, in Edgecombe county, N. C. of re- 
spectable parents. H is father's name was 
John, who married Absilla. Bell, by whom 
he had several children, none of whona 
were ever distinguished for any thing re- 
markable, save the individual whose life 
and death are herein recorded. Joshua 
whilst a lad was discovered to be shrewd* 
witty, and gave early presage of great 
powers of intellect and diversified talents. 
As s )on as he was able to handle tools, he 
commenced making various kinds of wood 
ware, &c for sale, and in process of time 
became a very ingenious mechanic without 
instruction. His father sent him to schoo! 
only a ypry short time, so that ho learner! 
to read and write" but imperfectly; his fa- 
ther dying soon after he commenced going 
to school, left no one who could control 
him, and instead of prontting by his advan- 
tages, he gave a loose rein to all the evil 
propensities of his nature. 

At about 17 years of age, he (with an 

old negro woman) settled on a plantation 

which hts father gave him, on which he 

lived till the day of his death. He lived 

in the woods a year or two, with little or 

no pathway to bis house; in which time 

(to use his own language) he became almost 

a complete wild man. Drinking, gambling, 

and debauchery composed a portion of the 

catalogue of many of his wicked practices; 

suffice it however to say, -that he was the 

ringleader in all the vice and immorality 

! in the vicinity in which his lot was cast; 

'but amid all his profligacy, he possessed 

a spirit of industry which kept him out of 

! the very depths of poverty and degrada- 

I tion. 

| A tan early ago he married Mary Knight, 
! by whom he had thirteen children, seven, 
(of whom and his wife he left behind him. 
| Soon after he married he commenced clear- 
ing and cultivating his land, and selling 
pork and corn; and at. his death left a com- 
| potency for his widow and children, which 
; industry and frugality had placed in his pos- 
! session. 

His conviction for sin (as stated by him- 
self) ».ook place *vhife he was in his tenth, 
'year; and under rhe reign of sovereign and 
jail conquering grace, he suffered the most 



pungent conviction, indulging at the same 
time in all the sinful practices which are 
characteristic alone of the most abandoned 
sinner. Endeavoring for some time by 
all the means which he possessed to rid 
himself of the distress of mind which he 
was under, produced by the weight and 
burden of sin and a guilty conscience, and 
finding no relief from what his own efforts 
could accomplish, he gave up all depen- 
dence in an arm of flem, and went to the 
Lord le^us Christ poor and naked as he 
found himself to be, and begged him to 
clothe him with that righteousness which 
alone can shield the soul from the wrath of 
a sin-avenging God, and which is alone 
given to and put upon all them that be- 
lieve. 

Here the Lord who worketh all things 
after the counsel of his own will, delivered 
him from the fear of hell and wrath to 
come, by applying to his conscience the 
following words: "Feely ye have receiv- 
ed, freely give." Here his prayer was 
turned into praise ami thanksgiving, his 
weeping into rejoicing, his hell into hea- 
ven; and fueling himself called to the work 
of the ministry, he eoofeired not with 
flesh and blood, but forthwith preached Je- 
sus as the way, the truth, and the life of 
the sinner's salvation. He joined the Bap- 
tist church at Fishing Creek, (now Law- 
rence's meeting house.) and was baptized 
by Elder Nathan Gilbert. He was ordain- 
ed at this place bv Elders Burkitr and 
Read, and became the successor of Elder 
Gilbert, who was at the time of his ordina- 
tion the pastor of the church at the Falls of 
Tar River. In the course of a year or two 
a glorious revival commenced at the Falls 
of Tar Rivei, under Elder Lawrence's 
ministry, and he baptized at one time 22 
persons, mostly young men and ladies; 
and within two years upwards of 100 were 
added to the church by baptism. 

He commenced preaching when about 
23 years old, and was unusually awkward, 
and having very little education could 
scarcely read without spelling his words as 
he went; but possessing gifts both natural 
and spiritual of the highest order, he soon 
reached a distinction in the ministry seldom 
surpassed. And so great at times was the ex- 
ercise of his mind, that he has been often 
known while asleep to give out a hymn, 
sing and pray, and then preach a lengthy 
sermon, without having any knowledge of 
it himself. He possessed a very retentive 
memory, and by close application obtained 



9 

a profound knowledge of the holy scrip- 
tures and church history. The doctrine 
of unconditional election and eternal pre- 
destination, was his theme and his song; 
and was exhibited by him in a manner 
which seldom failed to chain the attention 
of his audience He wa« never more at 
home than when in the pulpit, and whatev- 
er he attempted to prove from the word of 
God he seldom failed to do, and that too in 
a most satisfactory manner, having (seem- 
ingly) always at command all the scripture 
for which he had any use He was a great 
natural orator, and possessed a very plea- 
sant voice and a great flow of words; and 
so commanding was his general appear- 
ance, that he seldom failed to attract the at- 
tention ofall who saw or heard him. And 
we have ne'er seen the man whose ap- 

| pointments for preaching could call togeth- 
er as large and resp etable assemblages as 

| could those of Joshua Lawrence, even in 

| his immediate vicinity 

He had the pastoral charge of divers 
churches, during a long life of usefulness as 
a preacher of the gospel; by all of which 
his ministry w;is highly approved. In pri- 
vate conversation he was remarkably en- 
tertaining and instructive to young and old, 
religious and irreligious. He never trav- 
elled much while olhViiting in his ministe- 
rial capacity, but was very useful among 
the churches of which he had the pastoral 
charge, as also throughout the Kehukee 
Association, as he had the courage at first 
sight to expose error wherever and when- 
ever he detected it. 

In 1803, the churrh of which he was a 
member sent him as a dehgate to the Asso- 
ciation, which was h* Id with the church at 
Log Chapel, in Martin county, where the 
first missionary step was taken within ihe 
boundsofthe Kehukee Association; which 
was soon succeeded bv a spirit of reserve, 
distrust, and jealousy, and ultimately by 
disunion. And instead of that harmony, 
union, and brotherly love, which is so well 
calculated to adorn the church of Christ, 
angry debate, s'rife and contention became 
the distinguishing characteristics of chur- 
ches, neighborhoods, and family circles, 
within the bounds of our Association. 

After long viewing in silence the dis- 
tress which the churches were suffering un- 
der, and feeling confident that division 

j must ultimately ensue, he raised the stand- 
ard of opposit 10*0 to tiie society called JVlis- 

| sionary Baptists and all its concomitants; 

i and to the day of his death ihe unconquera- 



10 



ble purpose of his soul was to oppose and 
condemn every principle, which might in 
an)* wise be calculated to reduce the gospel, 
or represent the work of regeneration to be 
no more than what may be effected by hu- 
man effort. 

Of ihe many pieces which Elder Law- 
rence wrote, we shall only notice here, a 
piece purporting to be a Declaration of the 
Reformed Baptists in North Carolina, da- 
ted 26th of August, 1826: which was laid 
before the churches composing the Kehu- 
kee Association for their deliberation Af- 
ter calmly investigating the subject for 12 
monlhs, a large majority of the churches 
discarded the Missionary Societies, Bible 
and Tract Societies, Theological Semina- 
ries, &c &c. and the practice by them re- 
sorted to, of begging the public for their 
support. And while men of learning and 
talents were in various directions using all 
their influence to promote the cause of the 
ahove named ins'.i'-utions, and many emi- 
nent servants of God seemed (for a season) 
to stand in mute astonishment at the appa- 
rently fearful odds against them, Joshua 
Lawrence commenced a successful opposi- 
tion to the aforementioned schemes and de- 
Vices, solitary and alone, with the excep- 
tion of Elder William Hyman, the only 
minister of the gospel who expressed a wil- 
lingness to stand or fall by him. Backed 
by this yoke fellow in the gospel, and arm- 
ed with the word of God, unseduced by the 
thirst for gain or popular applause, unterri- 
fied by the threats and menaces of a nume- 
rous host of enemies, this man of God re- 
mained steady to his purpose. Soon a gen- 
eral separation took place between the dis- 
cordant parties, and a spirit of harmo- 
ny was soon discovered among those 
churches which continued steadfastly in 
the apostles* doctrine; and the white flag 
of gospel peace once more waved in sol 
emn grandeur over Kehukee soil He con- 
tinued to oppose the moneyed (religious) 
institutions of his day, both from the pul- 
pit and the press, by which means he be- 
came the object of vituperation, abuse, and 
calumny, for all who favored the schemes 
and devices of those whose object it was to 
live and prosper upon the sweat of the 
brow of others. 

We want no bet'er evidence of the reck- 
less and exterminating fury wiih which his 
enemies attempted to trample him down, 
than the many defamatory reports and 
printed publications, which were indusiri- 
ously circulated against him through many 



portions of the United State*, together 
with the many anonymous communica- 
tions sent him through the mail, in some of 
which his life was even threatened. But 
this we do not believe was done with any 
view whatever of being carried into effect, 
but (if possible) to deter him from a course 
so detrimental to their fondest hopes. 
However much his mind may have been 
harrassed and embittered by the frequent 
attempts of his persecutors to annoy him, 
still he entertained for the rights of man, 
the freedom of conscience, and the doc- 
trine of the Bible, an enthusiastic devo- 
tion, which age could not cool nor persecu- 
tion appal; and he brought to their support 
an amount of talents by no means common, 
and an high, unbending, adamantine cour- 
age, still less common. 

But all his pains and his labors are over, 
and he is now beyond the reach of malice 
or friendship; he can no longer be harrass- 
ed by the one or consoled by the other. 
The spirit has passed to its long sought 
rest, to thai bourne from which no travel- 
ler hath ever yet returned; and the great 
secrets ol immortality, however dark to us 
are solved to him. He spent a long life of 
usefulness amidst tribulation, toil and dis- 
tress, and suffered during a great portion of 
his life greater bodily affliction than most 
of the human family ever fall heir to. His 
health for several years immediately pre- 
ceding his death, was such as to forbid his 
leaving home for many days and nights to- 
ge'her, without doing himself great injus- 
tice; and he was often seen, while exerci- 
sing in his ministerial capacity both in the 
pulpit, and ai the water's side (whilst he 
was performing the ceremony of baptism,) 
when his emaciated appearance was suffi- 
cient to excite the sympathy and compas- 
sion of all who saw him. He continued 
to attend the church at I arborough regular- 
ly till he was confined to his death bed; 
having a son living within a few yards of 
the meeting house, he could rest with him 
before and after preaching, which afforded 
him great relief. 

He closed his days amidst a revival of 
religion at this place, during which time 
27 persons were added to the church by 
hapti.-m, which greatly revived his droop- 
ing spii its, and those also of the saints 
around him, whose harps had been long 
hung upon the willows. In the com- 
mencement of his last sermons he was com- 
pelled to rest his feeble frame on the pul- 
pit for support, but towards the conclusion 



it 



became animated and stronger. He was 
heard several times to say> that he had not 
witnessed such a revival (as the one just 
named) in thirty years, and which he had 
long prayed to see before he should go 
hence. 

The disease which closed his days* and 
with which he had long been afflicted, was 
bowel consumption; by which he was con- 
fined to his bed three or four months, and 
frequently suffered the most excruciating 
paim For a week or two after his last 
confinement, he seemed restless and unea- 
sy; but being visited by a great number of 
his brethren, (both ministers and lay mem- 
bers.) his last days were cheered by the 
presence of those whose company he had 
long delighted in. 

Being visited a short time previous to 
his death by the writer of this memoir, 
(who loved him as a neighbor, friend, and 
brother,) on entering the deceased burst in 
to tears and did not speak in some time; at 
length he remarked, 1 am glad to see you, 
and said likewise, the Lord revealed him- 
self to me in such' a special manner the 
night past, that I have not seen a moment 
since when 1 was unwilling to die; for, 
said he, I have nothing to do but to die, to 
get out of the storm. He was then asked, 
to tell in what manner his mind was reliev- 
ed of the distress which for a few days he 
had laboured under. He said, that his 
mind had been so beclouded for a season,! 
that'he could not see his way clear be- 
fore him and when he reflected that for 
forty years he had been a professor of re* 
ligion, and for the same length of time had 
likewise professed to be a preacher of the 
gospel, he shuddered at the mere thought 
of being at last deceived. But, said he, 
the Lord applied to my mind in such a 
manner as to dispel all doubts and difficul- 
ties, the following passages of scripture: 
1 will put my laws into their minds, and 
write them in their hearis; and 1 will be to 
them a God, and they shall be to me a peo- 
ple — According as he hath chosen us in 
him before the foundation of the world, 
that we should r be holy and without blame 
before him in love — Having predestinated 
us unto the adoption of children by Jesus 
Christ to himself, according to the good 
pleasure of his will — To the praise of the 
glory of his grace, wherein he hath made us 
accepted in the beloved — In whom we 
have redemption through his blood, the 
forgiveness of sins according to the riches 
of his grace — In whom also we have obtain- 



ed an inheritance, being predestinated ac- 
cording to the purpose of him who work- 
all things after the counsel of his own will, 
that we should be to the praise of his glory 
who first trusted in Christ. After which 
he continued to talk and preach till he was 
completely exhausted He said that he 
felt more fully established in the belief of 
the doctrine which he had preached during 
the whole course of his ministry, than ever 
at any time before; and his only regret 
now was, that he had not travelled aud 
preached more than he had. 

Being now ready to be offered up, and 
seeing that the time of his departure was at 
hand, he evinced great concern for the 
peace and harmonv of the churches which 
he was about to leave behind him, and 
when visited by his brethren in the minis- 
try, most of his time would be consumed 
in conversing upon the truths of the doc- 
trine which he had preached, and which 
had sustained him through life, and was 
now his only hope in the prospect ofdeath; 
and warned them of the danger he thought 
he saw of the churches being torn and rent 
asunder after his decease; and earnestly 
entreated them to continue to contend for 
the faith which was once delivered to the 
saints. And continued to testify, even 
with his latest breatIV, that the truth of the 
gospel, the faith of God's elect, was near 
and dear to him to the last. 

The gospel was his joy and song, 

Even to his latest breath; 
The truth he had proclaimed so long-, 

Was his support in death 

Now he resides where Jesus is, 

Above this dusky sphere; 
His soul was ripened for that bliss, 

While yet he sojourned here. 

The church's loss we all deplore, 

And shed the falling tear; 
Since we shall see his face no more, 

Till Jesus shall appean 

After all hope of his recoverv was lost 
he told his son (who was his principal phy-, 
sician,) that he was ready — waiting and 
willing to go. He seemed for a day or 
two after this, to pay no attention to any 
thing said to him, or what was passing 
around him, tili the Saturday morning 
which preceded his death on Monday; he 
then (unexpectedly) opened his eyes, and 
remarked how beautiful every thing look- 
ed without; and said also, that he thought 
he was a little beUer. He grew worse 
however, on the evening of that day; 
when it became very apparent to his friends 



12 



and family, that the vital spark must Soon 
forever quit his mortal frame. He remain- 
ed perfectly insensible and speechless, 
(except for a very short interval,) till the 
Monday following,; when at just 45 min- 
utes after 2 o'clock in the-evening, all that 
was immortal of that great man left its ten- 
ement of clay and winged its flight to that 
building of God, a house not made with 
hands eternal in the heavens; where wiih 
the congregated millions of happy spirits, 
he may hymn ti e praise of hi* Redeemer 
in a strain responsive to the words which 
he has so often repeated with animation — 
Worthy is the Lamb that was slain, and 
hath washed us in his blood, and made us 
kings and priests unto God, and we shall 
reign wiih him forever and ever. He de- 
parted this life the 23rd day of January, 
1843, aged 65 years 4 months and 1 3 days 

Laborious in his master's cause, 
His view, nor lucre nor applause; 
Willing to spend and to be spent, 
He ne'er tor filthy lucre went, 

But all his labors now are o'er, 
And we shall hear his voice no more; 
His dust lies silent in the tomb, 
For God hascall'd his servant home. 

His funeral sermon was preached (pre- 
vious to interment) by Elder James Os 
bourn, of I3al>im©re, in a very feeling and 
appropriate manner, to a large " assembly 
for so short a no! ice, from the 103rd 
Psalm, and 15th, 1 6 h, and I7lh verses: 
As for man, his days are as grass; as a flow- 
er of the field, so he flourisheth; for the 
wind passeth over it and il is gone, and the 
place thereof shall know it no more. But 
the mercy of the Lord is from everlasting 
to everlasting upon them that fear him, and 
his righteousness unto children's children. 



Elder Hyman then attempted in conemsiun 
to make a few remarks respecting his past 
intimacy with the deceased, but was so 
completely unmanned, that he could not 
proceed. Having long been yoke- 
fellows in the gospel, and having spent 
many days of hunger, heat and cold to- 
gether, their hearts had become knit to- 
gether as were those of Jonathan and David 
ofold, making as it were, only one soul. 
His body was then followed by neighbors, 
friends, and family and connexions, whose 
weeping and lamentation bore testimony to 
the high esteem in which they held him,) 
to its last resting place; which had been 
selected by himself, to fulfil tho^e solemn 
words in holy writ: Dust thou art, and un- 
to dust thou shalt return. 

0, happy soul! who safely pass'd 

Thy weary warfare here; 
Arrived at Jesus feet at last, 

And ended all thy carei 

No more shall siekness break thy rest, 

Nor pain create thy smart; 
No more shall doubts disturb thy breast, 

Nor sin afflict thine heart. 

No more the world on thee shall frown, 

No longer satan roar; 
Thy man of sin is broken down, 

And shall torment no more. 

Adieu, vain world! the spirit cries, 

My tears are wiped away; 
For Jesus fills my cup with joys, 

And fills it eveiy dayi 

A taste of love we get below, 

To cheer a pilgrim's face; 
But every saint must die, to know 

The feast of heavenly grace, 

Delightful concord always reigns, 

In Jesus' courts above; 
There hymns are sung in rapturous strains, 

With ceaseless joys of lovei 



Turburo l J ress. 






MINUTES 



01' THE 



Meliuliee Baptist Jlssociation, 

HELD AT 

Mehukee nl. h. Halifax Couniy., $. C. 

Commencing Saturday before the 1st Sunday in October ; vjt. D, 1$44» 



SATURDAY, Oct 5th, 1844. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was deliv- 
ered by Elder JEd win Harrison, from 2nd 
Timothy, 2nd chapter and 15th verse: 
w Study to shew thyself approved Unto 
God, a workman that needeth not to be 
ashamed, rightly dividing the Word of 
truth." 

2. The delegates from the several chur- 
ches then assembled, and the Association 
was opened with prayer by Elder Wil- 
liam Hyman and proceeded to business: 
When Elder William Hyman was chosen 
Moderator, and brother Jos. D. Biggs 
Clerk, who called to his assistance Elder 
C. B. Hassell 

3. Brethren in the ministry from sister 
Associations (of the same faith and order,) 
were invited to seats with us; when El- 
ders, Josiah Smith, James Osbourn, S. I. 
Chandler, and Jesse Adami, seated them- 
selves. 

4. Letters from 31 churches were hand- 
ed in and read, the names of the delegates 
enrolled, and the representation stated in 
the table of churches. 

5. Petitionary letters for membership in 



this Association were called for, but none 
were presented. 

6. Letters of correspondence and cor- 
responding delegates were called for; when 
a file of Minutes from the Little River As- 
sociation was handed in by their messen- 
gers Jesse Adams and J. J. G. Woodall; 
Jesse C. Knight handed in a file of Min- 
utes from the Contentnea; S. I. Chandler 
and E. Morrow a file of Minutes from 
Country Line; Josiah Smith a file of Min- 
uses from the White Oak; also, a file of 
Minutes received from Abbott's Creek U* 
nion Association. 

7. The following committees were ap- 
pointed: Brethren Joseph S. Battle and 
James S. Battle on finance; Stephen I. 
Chandler, Joseph D. Biggs, and Blount 
Cooper, to examine the Circular Letter; 
B. Cooper and Robert D. Hart to examine 
the biographies of Elders, Joseph Biggs 
and Jordan Sherwood; and report on 
Monday next. 

8. Resolved, that we correspond by let- 
ter and delegates with the following Asso- 
ciations, (viz:) White Oak, Contentnea* 
and Little River; Bro. C. B. Hassell was 
appointed to write to White Oak ; Stephen 



% 



Outterbridge to Oontentnea 
Battle to Little 
tions. 

9. Elders Osboiirn, 



and James S. 
.* 
River, Associa- 



Ghandler, 'and Ad- 
ams, were requested by private Ballot to 
occupy the stage to-morrow by preaching, 
and that divine worship commence at 10 
o'clock, A. M. 

The Association adjourned till Monday 
next, 10 o'clock, A.M. 



SUNDAY, Oct 6th, 1844. 
Divine worship wa,s opened by Elder 
Josiah Smith. Elder S. I. Chandler prea- 
ched from 45th chap. Isaiah and 22nd 
verse: "Look unto me and be ye saved, all 
the ends of the earth, for I am God and 
there is none else." Elder James Osbourn 
followed and preached from 40th chap, of 
Isaiah and 11th verse: "He shall feed his 
flock like a shepherd, he shall gather the 



Names of churches and 

counties wherein 

situated* 



PASTORS AND DELE 
GATES, 



(to; to 

tab 

set, S- 



1 Beargrass, Martin county, ! Wm. W mTAKER,Ab'm Peahl 

2 Blount'sCr'k,2?e««/b>Vfj 

3 Conono, Martin, — j Blount CooFER,JohnBryan,j 

4 Concord, Washington, — iMax.Tatum, DarinsPhel.ps,*! 

5 Conetoe, Edgecombe, John H.Daniel, W Thigpen; 

6 Cowenjock, Currituck, jSamuel Tatum, | 

7 Cross Roads, Edgecombe, \Nm. HtmaNj Sov'e Purvis,] 
'8 Cedar Islsnd, Carteret, — Geo. Styron,Th.-Goodwiu,*| 
9 Deep Creek, Halifax,— \\ 

10 Falls Tar River, Nash,—' Jos. S. Battle, JamesS Battle, 1 

11 Flat Swamp, Pitt, — j Wx W.K.Philput Irvin Page,' 

12 Flatty Greek,Pasquo'k,--f\ [Jonas Nelson,! 

13 Frying Pan, Tyrrell, — if. Meekins, H. Simmons,* | 

14 Fishing Creek, Halifax, I W. Powell,* Jethro Parker,] 

15 Great Swamp, Pitt, — |H. Whichard, J. S. Brown, 



1 6 Goose Creek, Beaufort, - 

17 Joyner's, Northampton^ — 

18 Kehukee, Halifax, — 

19 Lawrence's, Edgecombe,- 

20 LittleAlligator,2>re//,--}- 

21 Morattock, Washington,- 

22 North Creek, Beaufort, — 

23 Picot, Martin, — 

24 Powell's Point, Cur'k,— 

25 Pungo, Beaufort, — f 

26 Rocky Swamp, Halifax, 

27 Sappony, Nash, — 

28 Scupper n on g, Tyrrell,— ] 

29 So. Mattarhuskeet, Hyde, 

30 Sandy Grove, Nash, — f 

31 Skewarkey, Martin, 

32 Sawyer's C r'k, Gamden~\ 

33 Soi Quay, Hampton, Fa. 

34 Smithwick'sCr'k,Mc!r'n- 

35 Sound Sid a, Tyrrell, — 

36 Spring Green* Martiti, — 

37 Tarboro', Edgecombe, — 

38 Washington, Beaufort, — 

39 White Plains, Beaufort, 

40 Williams's, Edgecombe,- 



3 3 



Tames Potter, R. Campaign*! 
ThoSi.Toy.her, AbramJoyner, 
TurnerBrewer,JohnStamper 
'R'd Harrison,* Hardy Parker 

W WMizell, Daniel Leggett, 
NoahGaski!!,MartinD.Ross 

.}. Robertson* ClaytonMoore 
S. Sawyer,* H. Gallop,* 

L. B. Bennett; S. Nickels, 
Craw'd Baker, M. Joyner,* ] 

G. W. Carrowan, R. M.G.I * 

[Moore,*| 
C.B,Hassell,Jos D. Biggs, j 

E. Harrison, A.L.Gardner.;;! 
D. Singleton, B. Leggett,* j 
Samuel Rogers, j 2j 1 

S. Outterbridge, J. Griffin, \\ 
Coffield King, Rob't D.Hartj 2 
L. Wa11ace,Jacob Swindle, *]• 
.1 Wallace A Waters J Bowen I 2\ 
D. Bradley,* Ed. Power,* ! 



t- ^ 



169 1415 



5" => 2 



I - 



1: 24 



$ Cts 



2; 1 

) 1 



30 

24 

64 

43 

19 
37 
54 
21 
,20 
119 
48 

80 
36 
23 
43 

62 
40 

85j 

49! 



1 00 

25 
75 



'VS 



$ Cts 



Yearly, 

meetings 

\ Sunday & 

[Saturday 

before. 



1 OOJSdinAug, 

||3dinMare 

1 OOjlstinSep* 

1 50|4thinSep. 

' 25,|3dinSept« 

"3d[inMar s 

OOjpdinSeptc 

50i 



VV 



1 00 



2 50 |2dinSept. 
1 OOjlstinSep. 
J2djnNov. 
1 50; 

1 00'i4thinS e p B 
1 00 |3d inSep. 
1 OOlsdinSepL 
1 00 

75;|4thinAug 
1 50 



1 50/ 
1 50j4thinAug; 
1 00|3dinAug, 
' 00|2d inJari. 

|2d]nAug. 

|3dinAug. 

hstinSepi 



1 00 
1 00 



2 60|lstinSepa 

2d inOct, 

1 50 



1 00 



8§ 
17 

20 
32 
55 
25 
30 
32| 1 00 



1 00 

2 00 



i 

2 


oo' 




75 


1 


00 


1 


00 


I 


50, 




85 


1 


00 


1 

_ — 


00 

I 



:IstinJun. 
4minAug 

4th inSep 
IstinAug 
IstinAug 

3dinAug* 



13 ! 44 15 132910 5039 70 



NOTE. Pastors of churches and other ordained ministers are in small capitals; unordained 
ministers in italic,- those marked thus * were not present; from churches marked thus f we receiv- 
ed no intelligence, in that case their number stands as last represented; dashes — denote no pastors^ 
the column before the last, shows the contributions from the churches to the Association fund this 
year; the preceding column, the contributions to the delegate fund; the last column shows the yearly 
meetings of each church. 



3 



iambs with his arm, and carry them in his [ which was read and approved, and breth- 
bosom, and shall gently lead those that are * ren Robert D. Hart and James S. Battle 
with young." The weather was cloudy j were appointed our messengers to bear the 



and unpleasant, but a large concourse of 
people assembled and gave particular atten- 
tion to the preaching of the word, which 
we hope may be profitable to them, 

MONDAY, Oct. 7th, 1844. 



same with a file of our Minutes. 

17. Bro. Stephen Outterbridge handed 
in a letter to the Contentnea Association,, 
which was read and approved, and brother 
William Thigpen and Elder William Hy- 



The Association assembled and was j man were appointed our messengers to v 
opened with prayer by Elder John Daniel, j bear the same with a file of our Minutes. 
10. On motion, the Decorum of the As- 



sociation w T as read. 

11. The names of the. delegates to. this 



18. Resolved, that Elders, William 
Whitaker, L. B. Bennett, and C. B. Has- 
sell, and brethren, Richard Harrison, 



Association were called over, and those ab- I James EJlinor, and Jos. D. Biggs, be ap- 
pointed our messengers to the Country 
Line Association, and that they carry 25 



ver, an 
gent marked as such in the table of chur- 
ches. 

12. The Minutes received from the dif- copies of our Minute 
ferent Associations with whom we corres- 19 « Resolved, that the Clerk be directed, 
pond were distributed to the delegates. to forward to Abbott's Creek Union Asso- 

13. Eiders S. I. Chandler and C. B. ciaticn, 25 copies of our Minutes. 
Hassell were requested to occupy the stage 20 - The committee appointed to exam- 
ine the Circular Letter reported, that they 
approved of it and recommended its read- 
i.ng; which was done, and ordered to be at- 
tached to these Minutes. 

21. The committee appointed to exam - 
ine the biographies of Elders, Joseph 
Biggs and Jordan Sherwood, approved and 
recommended the reading of the same; 
which Was done, and ordered to be attach- 
ed to these Minutes. 

22. Resolved, that our next Association- 
he held with the church at Cross Roads m. 
h. Edgecombe county, N. C, to commence 
on Saturday before the first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, A. D. 1845, and that. Elder C. B. 
Hassell be requested to preach the Intro- 
ductory Sermon, and in case of failure, 
Elder Blount Cooper; worship to com- 
mence at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

23. Bro. R. D. Hart was appointed to 
write a Circular Letter for the next Asso- 
ciation. 

24. Resolved, that bro. Jos. D. Biggs be 



this day by preaching. 

14. The committees, appointed on Sat- 
urday were now called on to report. The 
committee of finance reported that — - 
There was "in the hands- of the Trea- 
surer at the close of last Associa- 
tion the sum of $49 20 
Paid for printing the Min- 
utes of last year, $30 00 
For superintending the prin- 
ting and distributing the 
Minutes of last yearas usual, 10 00 

40 00 



Now in thehands of the Treasurer, $9. 20 
Received in contributions from the 
churches at this Association for 
the use .of the Association, . 39 70 

And to the delegate fund the sum of 10 50 



Making $59 40 

The Association concurred with the re- 
port. 

15. Elder C. B. Hassell who was ap- 
pointed to write to the White Oak Associ- 
ation, handed forward a letter which was j requested to prepare these Minutes for the 
read and approved, and Elder John H. I P ress > superintend the printing thereof, ana 
Daniel and hro. Sovereign Purvis were ap- ! *' 
pointed our messengers to bear the same 
with a file of our last year's Minutes. 



16. Bro. James S. Battle handed in a 



| lowed 00 for his services. 

Whereas, Elder James Osbourn has 
published a Hymn Book in conformity to 



letter to 



the Little River Association, 1 l 



ho recommendation of the Association, 






&&d which work haying been examined by 
many of us meets our decided approba- 
tion: therefore Resolved, that we com- 
mend it to the attention and patronage of 
our brethren throughout the bounds of this 
Association, and hope they will give such 
encouragement as the case requires. 

The Association then adjourned, with an 
Exhortation and prayer. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Moderator, 
JOSEPH D. BIGGS, Clerk, 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 

§Fhe ministers and messengers compo- 
sing the ICehukee Association now in 
session, with the church at Kchukee 
meeting house, Halifax county, to the 
members of the several churches which 
they represent: 

De \rly beloved in Christ Jesus: 
Through the tender mercies of Israel's 
God, we have been permitted once more 
to meet each other in another annual ses- 
sion of our Association; and we rejoice to 
hear through your letters and delegates, 
that you are still contending for the faith 
Which was once delivered to the saints, and, 
may the Lord grant you a sufficiency of his 
gpaee and spirit to enable you to continue 
steadfastly in the apostles' doctrine, in (el- 
Jtawsbip, in breaking bread, and in prayers. 

It has long been our custom, beloved, to 
nddress you as we now attempt to do; and 
we fear, brethren, that you expect it more 
e-s a matter of course (or curiosity) than in- 
terest ; and while we address you on this 
occasion by way of exhortation, we be- 
seech you, brethren, to read again and 
again, and ponder well the contents of this 
our epistle of love. And may the Lord 
grant you grace to carry into practice what- 
ever we herein enjoin upon you, that is 
consistent with his word and will, on the 
all important subject of Practical Piety. 

And we do assure you, dear brethren, 
that we do not address you at. this time 
©imply to keep up a long standing custom; 
but because there is evidently an evil 
amon^t you, which we mcst earnestly de- 
sire to remedy. Practical godliness, the 
apostle Paul tells us, is profitable unto all 
things, having the promise of the life that 
now is, and of that which is to come. 1st 
Tim. 4 c. and 8 v. If godliness is thus 
profitable, is it not good to practice it? 
Most assuredly it is. Again: Our blessed 



Saviour said to his disciples, why call ye 
me Lord, Lord, and do not the things, 
which I ssy? Luke, 6 c 46 v. But says 
carnal nature, there are a great many things 
that our Lord said we ought to do, that are 
at w T ar with our own inclinations. Be sure 
then that it is right, for the Christian reli- 
gion is contrary to human reason in every, 
sense. To, the testimony: Because the, 
carnal mind is enmity against God: for it 
is not subject to the law of God; neither 
indeed can be. Rom. 8 c. 7 v. 

So then, beloved, if we would live a god« 
ly life we must deny ourselves of ungodli- 
ness and worldly lusts, and live soberly, 
righteously, and godly in this, present 
world. Titus, 2 c. 12 v. Remembering 
that it is written: Yea, and all that will live, 
godly in Christ Testis, shall suffer persecu- 
tion. 2 Tim. 3 c. 12 v. Are we suffering 
persecution at this time for righteousness 
sake, when our enemies charge us (as they 
do) with intemperance?, Nay, brethren, 
we dare not complain of persecution while, 
vve are only charged with a crime of which, 
we are (to say the least of it) guilty. And 
O, brethren in Christ, let this evil cea.se 
(we pray you) to exist among us. Again? 
We are charged with being "narrow-heari- 
ed — close fisted — covetous and uncharita- 



is this persecution, or does not thet 



hie 1 

conduct of a great, many of us give room, 

for such charges?: 

If we are guilty of the above charges, (as 
is unfortunately too true,) then it cannot ia 
any wise be persecution. And, dearbreth«? 
ren, let the time past of our lives suffice us 
to have wrought the will of the flesh,, and 
pray fervently to the Lord to give us grace, 
whereby vve may be enabled to serve him 
acceptably, with reverence and godly fear. 
Let us hereafter have no fellowship with 
the unfruitful works of darkness* bu.t rather 
reprove them. Kph. 5 c. \\ y. I^emorn- 
hiring that we arc the children of light, 
and let the light of the knowledge of the. 
glory of God, which is given us in the face 
of Jesus Christ; shine with brightness and 
lustre, and let us endeavor to remove eve- 
ry thifig which has a tendency to obstruct 
the rays of that light. 

But some of you may be ready to say, we 
cannot remove those obstacles. To such 
we would say, stop, and thii^k for a mo,- 
ment; and while pausing, ask yourself this 
question: Has not my conduct frequently 
oeen such as to obstruct the light that shone 
so conspicuously, when the day star from 
on high, first visited my benighted sou] q^ 



'(i-O rr:rrn\ng of ;ny conversion; then ! 
rsi i'le foa*r«* :-tMi! (tehiy&l not to Uecp ih*: 
coisn;;.i:K!int'nls of the Lor. I, and wtnle t'uu* 
ei;i>:<e^. in liiw rEelighaful employment* 
taMei'i spijrttuai health and strength 1 thou 
felt ttud enjoyed; *?o *h'it I could mount tip 
•#<ith toiftga as eagles, I could run and not 
fee vv< ary, auti walk and not faint. Isaiah, 
(0 e :il v. Here by looking hoick upon 
ffey p«<t ii'ftf, (-in -e i wa^ jhUtilred by faith) 
I discover that I have wandered very far 
fron t the way which leads to happiness and 
God. Alas, rdas: IJ.ow is the g dd become 
dim; how is the must line gold changed! 
Li m 4 e. 1 v. 

{( hi sui reality, brethren, that there 
are evils among us: and we exhort you to 
I c i us (henceforth) keep our lamp* trimmed 
and burning, and remember that if the light 
that is in us he darltneg', how great is ihH 
darkness. Matt. 6 c S?$ v Then, Belov- 
ed, let us remove the bushel from off our 
e'andie, that it may give light to all the 
house. Matt. S c 15 v. And let each be 
up and doing while it is called to -day, for 
"Iho night tfauutn \vhen no man can work. 
Let us therefore cast off (he works of dark' 
"nes^and put on the armor of light, and ab- 
;iiMii from fleshly hjsts which war against 
th"soul; lemembering that the works of 
the fle-di are these— adultery— ^witchcraft 
■—-haired — variances— emulation — wrath — 
strife — seditions — heresies — -envying* — 
murders — drunkenness — revilings — and 
suchlike. Gal. 4 c. 1 9-, 20, 21. And Paul 
tells us, that they which do such things 
shall not inherit the kingdom of God; and 
we tell you, that they which do such things 
should not continue members of our chur- 
ches. For if any man have not the spirit 
of Christ, he is none of his, Rom. 8 c 9 v. 
And the fruit of the spirit is love — joy — 
peace — long suffering— gentleness — good- 
ness — faith, — meekness — and temperance— 
against such there is no law; and they that 
are Christ's, have crucified the flesh with 
the affections and lusts. Gal. 4 c. 22, 23, 
"24 v. 

Therefore, beloved brethren, we want 
you to put away all such characters as may 
be guilty of any of the above charges, (lo 

Wit:) ADULTERY/, DRUNKENNESS, &.C. &C. 

And sweep your houses of ail such rub- 
bish as may in any wise be calculated to im- 
pair your spiritual health, so that you may 
flourish as the corn and as the vine, and 
spread forth your roots as Lebanon. Hos. 
14 c. 5 v. For rest assured, brethren, thai 
you cannot prosper so long as you counte- 



nance the practices above alluded to, by re- 
timing 'in fellowship rh *se wim are guilty 
of them. Therefore, awake, awake, put 
j on thy strength. Zion; put on thy beau- 
tiful garments, .Jerusalem, and hence- 
forth receive not among you the unctr-urrf- 
cised znd the unclean. Isaiah,- 52 c, i v. 
Hit place faithful sentinels at thy doors, 
and charge them to permit no one to enter 
who cannot articulate plainly and emphati- 
cally our long standing watchword, Seiih- 
boleth- Judges, 12 c. C v. Again we re- 
peat: Purge yourselves thoroughly, and 
forsake not the assembling yourselves to- 
gether as the manner of some is." Heb. 10 
e. 25 v. Cast out from among you what- 
soever of bad leaven there may be, calcula- 
ted to hinder vou from showing forth the 
Saviour's death till he come, by pirtaking 



of ihe elements around the communion ta- 
ble. 

This, brethren, you can and shoulcT'do, 
or break up housekeeping; and not when' 
your Moderator asks the question: Is all 
well? sit mute, hang your heads, while you 
feel bad. Your Moderator feels worse*, 
and if there is any visiting brother present, 
he wishes himself away. This evil y r ou 
nan and you should remedy. By suuctfy 
adhering to the above rules, our numbers 
(already small) would doubtless be dimin- 
ished; yet we believe it to be the only 
method by which Zion can be restored to 
that state which will enable Her to look 
forth as the morning, fair as the moon, clear 
as the sun, and terrible as an army with 
banners Songs, 6 c. 10 v. Again: Let 
us be steadfast in faith and practice, and in 
love and good works; and let us beware of 
indulging our wonted remissness and indif- 
ference, with respect to attending our sta- 
ted meetings of tiie church, (especially on 
Saturdays) for the celebration of God's or- 
dinances; and let us admonish, excite, and 
encourage one another to do so. 

And, dear brethren, we ag^in pray you 
lo observe all the duties enjoined upon yoa 
by the word of God, for it is but your rea- 
sonable service. Then shall thy light 
break forth as the morning, and thy health 
spring forth speedily, and thy righteous- 
ness shall go before thee; and the glorv of 
the Lord shall be thy reward. Isaiah, 5S 
c. S v. Then shalt thou call and the Lord 
shall answer thee. Remember that the 
above blessings are only to be enjoyed by 
living a godly life. And again: By draw- 
ing out thy sout to the hungry, and by sat- 
isfying the afflicted muU and reaching 



/orih the helping hand to tho need}', thy 
lighf siiall rise in obscurity and thy dark- 
ness be as the noonday, and the Lord shall 
feuide thee continualiy, and satisfy thy 
eoui m drought, and make fat shy bones, 
an J t :ou shalt be like a watered garden, 
and like a spring of wa'er whose waters 
fail not 

And they that shall be of thee shall 
fytiild the old waste p'aces, and thou shalt 
fye called the repairer of the breach, the re- 
storer of oa(hs to dwell in. Therefore, 
brethren, godliness is profitable unto all 
things, having the promise of the life that 
now is, and of that which is to come. And 
as ye have therefore received Christ Jesus 
the Lord, so walk ye in him, rooted and 
built up in him, and established in the faitn, 
as ye have been taught- Col 2 c. 8 v. Put 
on therefore as the elect of God, holy and 
beloved, bowels of mercies, kindness, hum- 
bleness of mind, meekness, long suffering; 
forbearing one another and forgiving one 
another. And above all. put on charity, 
which is the bond of peifectness. Col. 3 c, 
14 v 

And now, dear brethren, if charity is 
the bond of peifectness, (and the apostle j 
gays it is,) why not be charitable and do | 
good unto all men, especially to them who 
"re of the household of faith, F;ndeavor j 
1/ien to undo the heavy burden and let the j 
oppressed go free; untie the hands of your i 
ministers, so that they may give them- i 
selves wholly to the work which the Lord; 
has assigned them, and cease longer to treat ; 
this important matter with so much iodiflfer- j 
ence We feel confident, brethren, that a 
minister is (or should be) bound to attend, j 
wholly and altogether upon his calling in 
the ministry, and should not be forced (as 
some of ours are) to entangle himself in the 
affiirs of this life; his whole time and 
strength is lit'le enough to be undivided ly 
employed in the work and service he is 
called to, and he should by all means give 
himself to the ministry of the word, to 
prayer, reading, meditation, &c. &c. that 
his profilting may appear to all 1 Tim. 4 
q. 15 v» This the light of nature is suffi- 
cient to teach you, is but justice. But to 
the scripture testimony, 1 Cor. 9 c. 7 v., 
&c. &c. Who goeth a warfare any time at 
his own charges? who planteth a vineyard 
and eateth not of the fruit thereof? or ^eed- 
eth a flock and eateth not of the milk of the 



fli 



The ministry is a Warfare forced 



upon your ministers and undertaken alone 
(by faithful servants} st the command of 



Christ for you? spiritn.il welfare ariCi rte^ 
fence, and is it. not reasonable, is it not jus- 
tice, is it not scriptural, and in fine is it not 
practical godlt.ness, that your minish-r 
Should receive a supply of your carnal 
"things?" as much so as that a faiihfufr 
soldier ;moul i receive his foil pay (r<<m ihe/ 
government in whose service he M* em- 
ployed. Shall a man feed a fkn'k* (as gt 
pastor does,) and be denied the mjlk of rher 
flock? or is it consistent with common 
sense and justice, to deprive a man of the 
fruit of th.it vineyard which is planted, 
pruned, and cultivated by his own labor* 
thus h it in resp-ct of maintenance be v. 
'ween churches and minsters. 

Brethren, it is not charity stone; hot 
ju-tice ;\rd deb« that we plead for. sine the 
laborer is worthy of his hire, ami not the 
less worihy becausehe labors in the gospel 
field. By attending to our .duly as pq.i- 
red by the scriptures, the wilderness and 
£he solitary place would be made j^aai (ot 
them, while the d^seit would re'oice and 
blossom as the rose; then would your min- 
isters he relieved of a double burden, fnjp, 
ofttimes while the ministers of Chris* an? 
confined to their daily avocaiion*? at home, 
their breasts are so heavily charged witL 
the milk of the word, that they strew the- 
ground with their tears, while they trunk 
of the many destitute places of Zion, and 
while they hear (in their imagination) the, 
bleating of the flock which they are com- 
manded to feed; and though weary with 
holding in, yet the cares of a family (ofte'n 
destitute) compel them to labor 'dad tod dxf 
and night (nearly) for a mlti;-: support. 
Those are some of the many evils that are 
amongst us, and which can and should he 
remedied. Remember that your pasted 
a;e the ministers and ambassadors for 
Christ, and that t\v y dispense the word of 
God in his name; and therefore, ;is very 
treat Chtist's ministers, so yon tre.it him. 
Hence we read, he that receiveth > ou re~ 
ceiveth me; and he that despiselh you <Je*» 
friseth me, &c. Mat. 10 c. 40 v.; Luke, K) 
c. 16 v. 

And now, brethren deacons, a word |a 
ymu. You have been appointed by your 
church to attend to the sernTar affairs there- 
of, to serve tables, &<\; have you ever ex- 
amined into your pastor's condition, and 
reported it to the church? and after having 
done so, and after having attempted to 
raise a small amount to relieve his <vr.nts 3 
have you be«n mortified at seeing your v 
ablest members contribute £0 Cents Rfici 



«B*Mgtl!ttf* a tfbflnr, and your poorest ones 
tn •■ Same, am! some none, not a cent? have 
you sat down in confusion and scratched 
your head ? or .bit your lip, and let it pas?* 
off so? or have you in a private and bro- 
therly manner entreated them to do better? 
and then in case of non-compliance, hive 
\ on hftrughi them before the church to be 
deaU with for eovetousness? or otherwise, 
bei- g birds o! a fea'her, have you permit- 
ten the mote to remain in your brother's 
eye, because the beam was in your own? 
O, brethsen, arouse yourselves from your 
sloth and lethargy in which you have Song 
slumbered, and see that (hereafter) all 
things shall be done "decently and in or- 
der;" and be no longer a reproach to that 
Godliness, which is profitable unto all 
.things 

Brethren preachers, we know no? in 
what language to address you, seeing that 
yo'.t sre in the condition of ihe colt that 
was tied where two ways meet; but don't 
entangle yourselves with the things of this 
world, more than necessity compels you. 
Neiiher give yourselves up to sloth and 
idleness, so that the language which was 
applied ^o one of old may be applied to 
7ou: What doest thou here, Elijah? bti t 
endeavor to do the work of an evangelist, 
and make fuJI 'proof of thy ministry, And 
a^ iniquity grea lv abounds throughout our 
camps, enforce such precepts and examples 
as Israel should observe. And though the 
forces of Ahab and Jezebel are mustering 
thick and fast amongst us, yet remember 
that by wrestling with the Lord in prayer, 
Orud going forth to battle -in his name, *'one 
can chose a thousand, and two put ten 
thousand to flight. " And let u* not sleep 
as do others, but let us watch and be sober 

And now, dear brethren and sisters, who 
compose the Kehukee Association, while 
we take leave of you for the present, we 
exhort you to observe and do whatsoever 
you find herein enjoined upon you, that 
(upon comparison) may be found in accor- 
dance with the word of God, inasmuch as 
^on profess to be born of God, renewed in 
the spirit of your minds, and a joint heir 
wr.h Christ to that heavenly patrimony re- 
served in heaven for you and ali those who 
love his appearing. And don't let us con- 
tinue to treat the true servant^ of God as 
were (in times past) the camels of Arabia; 
when they -a ere compelled to feed on 
shrubs and thisde.s by the way, while hea 
vily laden with spices and jewels We 
hfcve omittetj to treat on divers other sub- 



jects, such as family worship, Sabbath- 
breaking, training u\-) children, &c &c. 
While W( ' have merviy glance; at ihe $u%- 
jects which occupy this (we fear mi some of 
you) unwelcome epistle; but our limits for- 
bid our doing the justice due to the impor- 
tant subject of practical godliness. 

Adieu: A few more revolving.? of the 

wheel of time and we are done meeting in 

our yearly Associations, done writing vir- 

colar^ to warn each other of the devices o( 

satan; but with the congregated million* of 

happy spirits, we shall meet in our Falh- 

j er's kingdom above, where no evil can en- 

Iter, but where our corruption, contempt 

poverty, oppression, and misery, wiil b^ 

I turned into holiness, comfort, honor, 

| wealth, and happiness. And where faith 

I will be turned into sight, and pracucai god- 

I lines'* into the uninterrupted worship and 

i glory of God: while the Lamb in the midst 

j of the throne shall feed us, and lead us to 

1 living fountains of waters, and God shall 

| wipe away all tears from our eyes. 

I 

BIOGRAPHY OF I 

ELDER JOSEPH BIGGS. 

Elder Biggs was born 12th November 
1766 in the then county of Tyrrell, (since? 
Martin,) N C . within about three miles of 
the place, where Williamson now stantis> 
He was tne youngest son of Joseph and 
Margaret Biggs, natives of Virginia; who 
removed »o North Carolina some years 
after their marriage and settled on Smith- 
wick's creek, where the subject of tin's 
memoir was born. 

Elder B. resided with his p3rems, un- 
til his marriage with Elizabeth Gregory, 
of ( amden county, which took place on live 
27th August 17S4, in the eighteen; n year 
of his age. 

He losi his first wife on 'he 9th October 
17S6, having lived with her but little over 
two years. 

On the 201 h February 1787, he jn'er- 
married with Ann Phillips of Beaufort 
county, with whom he happily lived for 
more than twenty yea»s: bin ^he dying on 
the 25th October, 1807, he felt the loss to 
be very great; f< r in addition to her ab- 
sence, he had the care of a large famih res- 
ting.alone on him: and his domestic duties, 
in and out doors, together with his minis. 
terial ones, he found to be rather insuppor- 
table: and to relieve his situation, in some 
degree, he again sought a pwpmei tor Hfe, 
and accordingly on the 4th February 180$, 



•B 



%as married to Ch'ioe Daniel of Martin 
count v, with whom ha lived in the bonds 
of connubial happiness during a period of 
36 years. 

Elder Biggs had by his first wife two 
children, by his second eight, and by his 
last who yet survives him six, making in 
al! sixteen. At the time of his death he had 
giving children, grand children and great 
grand children about 124 

In 17^5, he with his first wife and one 
child, his father and family, liis brother 
Ked^.r and family, set out for lire State'*©! 
Georgia, where they arrived and 'settled 
near the Oconee River in January, follow- 



taking 'the cens n s for M : #rf i n Venn ry ir> 
1*00, member and cic.rk of the board <of 
commissioners at Willi . nj^tosi. utimintt* 
and clerk of the hpa/d of tru.-t es ui Wjj. 
iiamsfon Academy-^ deputy te^is'tT c[ she 
county, depot y cikvk of the eodtfry court, 
clerk and master in equity, &e. &c ; all of 
which ^nttfte, afe'pe&Ml fd be u-eii cor. tided 
In him and h'is conduct thei-em g<rve itvg 
public k%ii$;j&£f0n. 

Religious exercife of mind hegan witffi 
Elder niggs in early life. At the age of 1 1 
years his mind ^ta set inusiy impivssVd by 
the reading of Bunyan's i^igrim's Prog- 
res< and other cause's, and so continued to 



Utile while; for the Indians breaking out 
itaing that same year, (178'6.) they Had to 
leave 'neir new settlement, and being once 
agu- •; on the road homeward, they conclu- 
de r.' return to Iheir old residences; in- 
■fgryiing 10 move back again when things 
we«e quiet; but this determination was 
finally abandoned, and Elder Biggs there- 
fore regained a resident of Martin county 
the *em.&i-p.d.er of his days. 

H^ became a citizen of YViliiamston in 
October 1810, and continued a useful mem- 



in* There, they remained however but r be at times, for a number of veais; but he 

was never brought to an experimental 
"-knowledge of the Saviour, till alter his se- 
cond m -Triage, which was about the 25th 
year of his age. 

•From the time of h's conversion, he 
thought his mind tolerably well establish- 
ed in the doctrine of grace and in the na- 
tuie of church ordinances; yet if. so turned 
out, that he was tempted id shtink from 
hapi ism and endeavored to reason himself 
out of the notion of it. And *,;ie moie ef- 
fectually to still his conscience oil that sub- 
ber of society there for -up wards : of thirty jject, he gained the Methodist society, who 
years In conjunction with a few other*, j endeavored fo persuade him that sprink- 

' ling in infancy was sufficient btptisft. He 

soon became a class leader and preacher in 

that society, and struggled on against tfoi 

stings of conscience for three years. The. 

Baptists, had of course been represented t<* 

:j-' of education. His own educa- 1 him as being -a very odious people, and he 

very limited, having received in { had some hesitation in asking baptism at 

something less than six months their hands; until lie obtained a copy of 



.lie .v-is 

aeademy 

i®j th> 

jq^feams \\ 

tha : m 

the ; tess 

tio a .v;> r 

■eail.- life 

sehoudng; yet he appreciated literature, I their articles of faith, which to his surprise 

and mum improved his own mind in the ) so perfectly harmonized wilh his own sen- 



very instrumental in having an 
greeted in that place and supply- 
same with teachejs, by which 
e orient and rising generation in 
ity have been maoh benefitted hy 



course of a long experience, and gave to his 
children about as good an education as the 
schools vnhin his reach could impart. 

Khier Biggs after settling in Wiiliams- 
ton, commenced merchandizing and con- 
tinued tha" business eiiher alone, or in 
pattnership with others, till within a few 
years of his death. His last partner, which 
constituted the firm of Joseph Biggs & 
Son. w.'is Joseph D Biggs, the oJdesi son 
by his last wife. 

Independent of his religious duties, he 
Was useful in other departments, such as 
administrator and executor of estates, guar- 
to orphans, entry taker, constable, 
-•rale, collector of public, county and 
h taxes, postmaster, ])rincipal assessor 
r act of Congress in 1798, deputy col- 
lector of internal duties, deputy marshal in \ 



timenls, that he readily offered and was re- 
ceived a member of the Baptist church a'i 
Skewar key, on the 7Hi August 1795; and 
two days thereafter was baptised by her 
pastor, Elder Martin Ross. 

in February following, he was ordained 
to the administration of gospel ordinances, 
by Elders Noah Tison and Amos Harrell, 
and in a very short time took mem- 
bership in, and the pastoral care of the 
church at Flat Swamp, Pitt county. This 
office he held for about ten years, during a' 
part of which time that church with many 
others in the Kehukee Association, was 
visited with a wonderful outpouring of 
God's spirit; and in comparison with for- 
mer years, many were added to the Lord. 
During the years 1502 and J 3, Eider Biggs 
baptised for that church over 100 persons. 



Altogether we must consider fSMer 
Biggs as one among the very useful men of 
his age, and as having been as serviceable 
to Zion as any one of his cotemporaries. 
He bore the heat and burden of the day 
and labored long and hard in the gospel 
field, looking for his reward in heaven for 
in this world he neither received nor ex- 
pected it. 

He was a regular Baptist minister for 4S 
years, had been a member of religious soci? 
ty 52 years and a preacher for nearly the 
same length of time. 

He continued his pas'oral duties with 
the church at Skewarkey, until the day of 
his la>t illness. Very early on Saturday 
morning of their meeting day in Novem- 
ber last, after rising and dressing himself as. 
usual, he was attacked with paralysis in 
the left side, while sitting in his chair; he 
was taken thence to bed from which he ne- 
ver arose in health. For awhile he wag, 
speechless, but at length his speech return- 
ed to him. His mind however, was much 
affected by the stroke and never regained 
its wonted vigor and perspicuity, though 
at times he-, appeared rational for a few mo- 
ments together. He went down the tide 
of time so gradual, that the motion was air 
most imperceptible. For days and weeks 
and almost months together, no apparent 
alteration in his condition was diseovera 
ble, by any one not an immediate attend- 
ant. Yet he must have been slowly di- 
minishing in strength and the exercise of; 
the animal functions. He went down gra- 
"T" j.rjua|J$j calmly and almost imperceptibly, 
ag the sun towards the western horizon, 
until he fin illy sunk in death and rested in 
the world beyond. He lingered for near- 
ly seven months, being calm, resigned and 
good humored throughout this long illnes*; 
and finally fell asleep in Christ on the 31>t 
day of May, 1^44, at about § o'clock P. 
M and in the 78th yerr of his age "Mark 
the perfect man, and behold the upright: for 
the end of that man is peace. " 

Elder Joseph Biggs was a firm support-, 
er of the doctrine of the gospel; and those, 
points of that, doctrine, touching ptedesti- 
naiion, election and the final perseverance 
of the saints in grace, were warn ly advo- 



tn 180$ he returned (o the church at 
Skewarkey, took the pastoral care there 
of and continued in that capacity till his 
death; making a period of about 38 years 
uninterrupted overseer ship of that church. 

Paring his. ministry, he was pastor and 
occasional pastor for six churches, if no 
more, viz: Flat S , amp, Skewarkey, Tran- 
ter's Creek, Smithwick's Creek, Beargrass 
&n<& Picot. He aided in constituting the 
church at. Sm.ithwick's Creek, Tranter's 
Creek, (toss Roads, Little Conetoe, Picot, 
Old Ford and Beargrass. He has assisted 
in ordaining 7 persons to the administra- 
tion of gospel ordinances, and 10 to the of- 
fice of deacon: has baptised as many as &2 
persons at one time; about 400 during the 
course of his ministry and travelled a por- 
tion of the time in discharging his ministe- 
rial labors, some 2000 miles a year. 

He was chosen clerk of the Kehukee As- 
sociation in 1807, and rechosen to that of- 
fice annually to the time of his decease, 
with the exception of* about 3 years, when 
from indisposition he was unable to attend 
the sittings of that body. Fie was well fit- 
ted for^ that appointment and obtained 
much credit for the regularity and preci- 
sion, with which he discharged it's duties. 
His habits and disposition, were much of a 
business order, and in church, union and 
Association meetings, he was noticed for 
the due order and regularity, with which | 
he must have things conducted: and we 
should not risk much in saying that as a 
disciplinarian, the Kehukee Association 
has not had his equal. He more excelled i 
in this character, than in that of pre 
ing; for notwithstanding, he was an excel- \ 
lent minister — well versed in the scrip- j 
tur.es, and clothed his ideas in good L n ! 
guage and some of which were big with 
importance: yet there were some others, 
who appeared to show in a general way 
richer gifts in the ministry. 

Elder Biggs was one of the principal ori- 
ginators and supporters of the union meet- j 
jngs, that at one time prevailed amongst j 
many churches in the Kehukee Associa- | 
tion. They were considered very useful, ; 
qnd opened a wide field for Christian in- 
tercourse and the preaching of the gospel, j 
They were attended for some years after ; 

their formation, not only by hundreds, but caied and stedtaslly adhered to by him, to 
frequently by thousands of persons and the latest period of Ins rationality; living 
many ministering brethren. They have 3S he had desired to live, a monument of 



been abandoned of laie years, 

quence of the backwardness of brethren to 

#}9et and unite as once they did. 



. God's mercy, and trusting alone in the im- 
puted righteousness of the Lord Jesua 
Christ for life and eternal salvation. 



to 



short season; becoming dissatisfied, he. 
joined the Baptist church at the Falls of ; 
Far River, and was baptised by Eider E- 
manuel Skinner. He continued his mem- 
bership with the church at the Falls for 
some years, but was at length (with several 
others) constituted into a church at Sappo- 
ny, and Eider Sherwood took the pastoral 
charge of the same, and was ordained by 
Eiders Lancaster and Gilbert, When he, 
first commenced preaching, he would hold 
small meetings in private houses, some- 
times only sing and pray, at other times he 
would read printed sermons, such as he 
thought would be interesting to his, hearers 
For sometime after he commenced prea- 
ching, he possessed a very pleasant and 
commanding voice; and when he entered 
the stand for prea-ching, he generally com- 
menced in a low tone pf voice, but became 
more and more animated as he progressed 



BIOftBA/HST. OP. 

ELDER JORDAN, SHERWOOD. 

Mark the perfect man, and behold the up- 
right: for the end of that man is. peace. 
37th Psalm and 37 v. 

In submitting to the public the follow- 
ing narration,, we do so with a conscious- 
ness that few. men have lived and died 
among us of as pure and spotless a charac- 
ter as the subject of its content*; having in 
all the. relations of life so sustained himself 
as to command the respect and .-ecu re the 
esteem of a wide circle of friends and ac- 
quaintances; and when we add to this, his 
upright walk and practical piety as a man 
of God, we have no hesitancy in saying 
that his. name deserves and shoo id be 
awarded a high place among our departed 
divines 

According to record, Eider Sherwood j on his. -subject. But for several years he- 
was born in Nash county , N C., the 1-th | fore his death he became so remarkably 
day of Mav 1759. near ( ockrelfs Bridge, 'feeble, that very few of his congregation 
(on Tar River.) where he remained til! the. could hear him distinct Jy ; yet. so great was 
day of his death. His parents were Ed- the interest he seemed to feel in his mas- 
mond and Elisabeth Sh< rwood, who were | ter's cause, that he attended four churches 
very poor but. rj specrabie people. They regularly, often exhorting the members of 
had four children, the deceased was the on- 
ly son; he was not considered unusually 
wild, never having been guilty of those out- 
breaking practices so common in the 
world of cursing and swearing. He had 
formed many resolutions to amend his life, 
and had fixed his time to get religion after 
getting married; previously however he 
was drafted as a soldier in the revolutiona- 
ry War and was stationed in New York, 
where he served nine months under Gene- 
ral Washington, and has been heard to. re- 
mark that he aided in raising the first buil- 
ding ever erected at the place called West 
Point, so noted at present for a Military 
Academy under the direction of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States. He was ne- 
ver however in but one battle, having to 
attend to his sick father who was for a long 
time confined to the hospital. He return- 
ed home from the war, and was married 
when about twenty-one or two years of 
age to Jane Poland, by whom he had three 
sons and seven daughters. 

After being married, the Holy Spirit 
impressed upon his mind the promi-e he 
had made in his youth, and he became 
greatly concerned for his future welfare; 
which ended in his conviction for sin and 
conversion to God. He joined the Meth 
wiis.t society, where he remained only a 



his several churches in the language of: 
John, ''Little children, love one another. " 
The utmost harmony and peace prevailed 
among the churches of which he was pas- 
tor till the year 1841, when the spirit of 
modern missionisrn, (which has ever pro- 
duced discord, strife and contention wher- 
ever its baneful influence has been felt,) en- 
tered the church at Sandy Grove; where- 
upon Elder Sherwood gave up the pastoral 
charge of said church until a final separa- 
tion took place. After harmony was re- 
stored among those who contended for the 
true faith and practice, they called on EL_ 
der Sherwood to become their pastor and 
he consented to do so. 

He continued to the last to have the con- 
fidence of all who knew him, and although 
\rminsans were hostile to his doctrine, 
they could not say aught of the man. He 
possessed little or no education, never hav- 
ing enjoyed the advantages which many 
have abused. But being blessed with strong 
reasoning faculties, he seldom failed while 
preaching to give comfort to the! hristian, 
encouragement to the mourner, and warn- 
ing to the sinner; holding steadfastly to 
ihe doctrine of unconditional election and, 
eternal predestination, and gifted in infor- 
ming the judgment rather than working; oa 
the passions of Iris hearers.. 



It 



it may not. be amiss probably to say in; 
this place, that in the winter of 1833 he 
was confined for several months to his bed, 
and it was supposed by his friends and 
'neighbors that the time of his departure was 
close at hand, and the writer of this sketch 
.visited him frequently during his confine- 
ment, and often heard him remark that he 
was ready and willing to obey the sum- 
mons of death; but should he again recov- 
er, he would endeavor to spend more of his 
time in his master's vineyard, and seemed; 
to regret that he had not in his younger j 
day s dwelt more on the doctrine of elec-| 
tion and predestination. He however re- 1 
covered, and continued to attend four chur- j 
. ches regularly till the 3rd Sunday and Sat- : 
urday before in November 1S42; he rode 
on horseback to Sandy Grove meeting 
house eleven miles, where he preached his 
last sermon on Sunday from the following 
words: earth, earth, earth, hear the 
.word of the Lord. Jeremiah, 22 c. 29 v. 
He returned home* on Sunday evening, 
complaining of no pain but a slight fever. 
He gradually grew worse, but took no me- 
dicine only a small dose occasionally to re- 
gulate his bowels. Fie was visited during 
his last illness by many of his friends and 
"brethren, and when spoken to respecting 
his views of the plan of redemption, ex- 
pressed full confidence in the doctrine 
which he had advanced and defended du- 
ring his ministry, and exhorted his breth- 
ren to contend earnestly for the faith which 
was once delivered to the saints 

He continued perfectly sensible to his 
latest moments and seemed rather to exult 



in the prospect of a rich reward after death 
for all his toils and labors here below. 

His mind all tranquil, all serene, 
No terrors in his looks were seen? 
His Saviour's smiles dispell'd all gloom, 
And smoolh'd his passage to the tomb. 

Thus ended on the 9th da)* of Decem- 
ber 1S42, the subject of this short but faith- 
ful narrative, aged 83 years, 6 months, and 
9 days, calmly resigned to the will of that 
Almighty being, who gave the existence 
which he took away. He left a wife and 
six children to mourn the close of a life en- 
deared to them by its Christianlike piety 
and parental fondness, and which like the 
mild and beautiful evening in spring, gave 
the cheering and confident hope of a pure 
and unclouded morrow. 

Farewell my hopes, my doubts, my fears, 
Soon with my Saviour I shall dwell; 
How bright the heavenly morn appears: 
Farewell, unfriendly world, farewell. 
Life's duty done, now sinks the clay 
And from its load the spirit flies; 
While heaven and earth unite and say, 
How blest the righteous when he dies;. 
Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord 
from henceforth; yea, saith the spirit, for 
they rest from their labors and their work* 
follow them. And although the members 
of the several churches of which rOlder 
Sherwood had the pastoral charge are left 
to mourn the loss of one so greatly belov- 
ed, yet we can but adopt the language of 
one of old and say, the Lord gave and the 
Lord hath taken away, and blessed be th$ 
name of the Lord. 



Printed at the Office of the Primitive Baptist, Tarhoro', N. C. 




•-•« 






MINUTES 



OF THE 



Kehuhee Baptist .Association, 

HELD Af 

Cross Roads ssa. ii. Edgecosnbs Cmirnij, F¥.€. 
Commencing Saturday before the 1st Sunday in October, A, D. 184. 



SATURDAY, Oct. 4th, 1845. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was deli- 
vered by Elder C. B. Hassell, from Jude, 
1st and 2nd verses: "Jude, the servant of 
Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them 
that are sanctified by God the Father, and 
preserved in Jesus Christ and called: Mer- 
cy unto you, and peace, and love, be mul- 
tiplied." 

2. The delegates from the several chur- 
ches then assembled, and the Association 
was opened with prayer by Elder Wil- 
liam Hyman, and proceeded to business; 
when Elder William Hyman was chosen 
Moderator and Joseph D. Biggs, Clerk, 
who called to his assistance Elder C. B. 
Hassell. 

S. Brethren in the ministry from sister 
Associations, (of the same faith and ord'er,). 
were invited to seals with us; when El- 
ders John Stadler and James Wilder^ from 
the Country Line; Ichabod Moore, from 
Contentnea; and Josiah Smith and Ed- 
ward W. Cox, from the White Oak Asso- 
ciation, seated themselves. 

4. On motion, the Rules of Decorum 
were read. 

5. Letters from thirty churches were 
handed in, read, the names of the dele- 
gates enrolled, and the representation sta- 
ted in the table of churches, 

6. Petitionary letters for membership in 
this Association were called for, 



7. Letters of correspondence and cor- 
responding delegates were called for, when 
a file of Minutes from the White Oak As- 
sociation was handed in by their delegates, 
Elders Josiah Smith and Edward W. 
Cox; Elders John Stadler and James Wil- 
der handed in a file ©f Minutes from the 
Country Line; brethren Jesse C. Knight 
and James Griflin, and Elder Parham 
Puekett, handed in a i\le of the Minutes 
from the Contentnea Association. 

8. The following committees were ap- 
pointed, (viz.) brethren James S. Battle* 
and Robert D. Hart, en finance; Elders 
Stadler and Wilder, and brethren Battle 
and Biggs, and the writer., te examine the* 
Circular Letter. 

9. On motion, the Rules of Decorum 
were read. 

10. Resolred. that we correspond by- 
letter and delegates with the following As- 
sociations: White Oak, Contentnea, and 
Little River. Elder B. Cooper was ap- 
pointed to write to White Oak; Elder C. 
B. Hassell, to Contentnea; and brother R. 
D. Hart, to Little River Associa- 
tion. 

11. The Minutes of the different Asso- 
ciations with which we correspond, were? 
distributed to the delegates. 

12. Elders Stadler, Wilder, and Smith, 
were requested by private ballot to occupy 
the stage to-morr©w by preaching, and that 



«iivin« worship commence at 10 o'clock, 
A. M. 

The Association adjourned till Monday 
next, 9 o'clock, A. M. 

SUNDAY, Oct. 5th. 

Elder "Wilder preached from 2 Timo- 
thy, 4 chap. 7 and S verses: "I have fought 
a good fight, I have finished my course, I 
have kept the faith: Henceforth there is 
laid up for me a crown of righteousness, 



which the Lord, the righteous Judge, shalf 
give me at that day: and not to me only, 
but unto ail them also that love his ap- 
pearing." Elder Smith preached from 
Solomon's Song, 2 chap, and latter clause 
of 3rd verse: "I sat down under his sha- 
dow with great delight, and his fruit was 
sweet to my taste." Elder Stadier, from 
Solomon ? s Song, 4 chap, and 12th verse: 
"A garden enclosed is my sister^ my 



j f g3! fc 


g 




':'i' 
S 


&$& ^ Ytatl $ 


Barnes of churches and |"§ i F 


?' 




eg 


% j? 2 1 11 \Vneeting% 


counties wherein | PASTORS AND DELE-jf^ 


*? 




i 


$■ 1 S*! £ ^{Sunday & 


situated. GATES. i P« ! S 


r^ 


g 


% 


& JE 1\--~-— ^Saturday 


..i . 1 \£ 


V 


r- 




_ 


? s |S Cts J before. 


I Beargrass, Martin county, VvM.VVHiTAKER,Ab'rn Peat,! 






i 


1 


I 


23) 1 OOjSdiftAng. 


QB\o\mi'&C?)&iBeaufort r f. [David Woolard,! 












jfsdinMarr 


2 Conoho, MaHwi, — .GrorNTCoopaR,.Iohn Bryan, j 3 




1 


3 






39| i OOjlstinSep. 


4 Concord, Wa$Mv$<m,- V ;T ::.Ya tum, Jesse Sawyer, i 1 








3 


2 


341 1 00||4thinSep. 


5 Conetoe ; Edgecombe, 1 ;ohn H .Daniel, V\ Thigpenj 








1 




31 1 50.|3dinSeptr 


6 Cowenjock, Currituck, Samuel Tatum, 












IpdinMar* 


*t Cross Roads, Edgecombe, \\ m. Hyman, Sov'n Purvis,' 1 








i 




30| i OOfSdinSept. 


8 Cedar Island, Carteret, — ThosiRobertson,S.Lupton,*j 


2 


1 




2 




23 


1 50: 1 


9 Deep Creek, Halifax,— f 


i - 














1 


10 Falls Tai River, Nash,— 


James S Battle, Robt Sorey,! 4 




1 




2 




64 


2 50J fed in Sept. 


11 Flat Swamp, Pitt, — 


Wi W.K.Philpot Irvin Page,] 








3 




38 


1 25j|lslinSeps 


12 Flatty Creek, Pasquo^k,-^ 


















i2dinNov. 


14 Fishing Creek, Halifax, 


W. Powell, Jethro Parker, 


5 












39; 1 00!|4thinSep* 


13 Gum Neck, Tyrrell, — 


I. Meekins,* H. Simmons, 


1 




1 








20! 1 00! I 


15 Great Swamp, Pitt, — 


H. Whichard, J. S. Brown* 




1 




4 




-49J 1 00 |3d inSep, 


] 6 Goose Creek, Beaufort, ~ 


Tames Potter, 1 1 


2 






1 




22, 1 00|3dinSept. 


17 Joy ner's, Northampton, — 


Thos.Joyner, Abm.Joyner,*j 






i 






19 1 00 


4thinAugr 


13 Kehukee, Halifax, — 


Gen'l You ng,Torrier Brewer,' 




2 


2 


2 




103 


75! 


19 Lawrence's, Edgecombe,- 


ArthurParker>R'd Harrison, 1 






1 






47 


1 50' 




20 LittleAlligator,7V//-re//,--| 


J,* L 














| 




81 Morattock, Washington,- 


WWMizel!,DanielLeggetV 3 




4 


I 


3 




74 


1 50, 




22 North Creek, Beaufort, — 


E, Foreman* Jos, Hi Clark, 




1 




1 






36 


1 70§4thinAug 


S3 Picot, Martin,, — 


C lay tonMoore, SB Williams 










3 




24 


1 00'|3dinAug, 


14 Powell's Point, Cur'k,— 


Wilson Sawyer, S.Sawyer, 


1 






1 


1 




46 


1 O0.|2d in Jan. 


95 Pungo, Beaufort, — 


H.L.Davis,* Aquilla Davis, 


1 








3 




22 


1 20j|2dinAug* 


16 Rocky Swamp, Halifax, 


L. B» Bennett, S. Nickels, 


2 




4 




1 




57 


1 00,l3dinAug. 


17 Saopony, Nash, — f 




















[lstinSep« 


IS Scuppefnofcg, Tyrrell, — j 






















19 S©i Maitamuskeet, Hyde, 


G. W. Carkowan, A, B. 


8 




2 


3 


1 


I 


88 2 JOlr- 'i , r 


40 Sandy Grove, Nash, — f 


[Swindell, 
















72(1 inOct, 


SI Skewarkey, Martin, 


CB«Ha$se:ll,Jos D. Biggs, 


3 








1 




49 


1 50|2dinAug* 


12 Sawyer's Cr'b, Gamdtn-f 


[AiL. Gardner, 
















ii 


S3 S©i Quay, tfe'ampton, Va. 


E.Habrison,* Jona.Darden, 


1 






1 






82 


£ OollstinJaB. 


S4 8B&iihwick'8Cr'k,Mar'n- 


John Hodges, D. Singleton, 














17 


75g4thinAugf 


15 Sound Side, Tyrrell, — 


A. Ji Swain, T. Cahoon, 


5 


1 




1 


1 


1 


31 


i oof 


16 Spring Green, Martin, — 


J. Grilling S. Qutterbridge, 


2 












32 


1 0OJ4thinSep 


17 Tarboro', Edgecombe, — 


Rob't D.Hart, Coffield King 


1 






1 


2 




54 


1 SOjlstinAug 


S8 Washington, Beaufort, --\ 












1 






lllstinAug 


JW WhitePlains, Beaufort, 


J. Wallace, Arnet Waters, 








1 


1 




28 


1 OOjilstinAug 


40 WU]iam»'s, ^c/gecomfo,- 


D. Bradley,* Ed. Power, 










1 




31 


1 00j|3dinAug» 






43 


6 


15 


18 


39 


5 


1252 37 65 



NOTE i Pastors of churches and other ordained ministers are in small capitals; unordained 
ministers in italic,- these marked thus * were not present; from churches marked thus f we receiv- 
ed no intelligence, in that ease their number stands as last represented; dashes — denote no pastors^ 
Jhe column before the last, shews the contributions from the churches to the Association fund this 
y«ar; the laet eolumn shows the yearly meetings of each church. 



a 



spouse; a ipring ihut up, a fountain 
sealed." 

MONDAY, Oct. 6th. 
The Association assembled, and was 
opened with prayer by Eider John Stad- 
ler. 

13. The names of the delegates to this 
Association were called over, and those 
absent marked as such in the table of chur- 
ches. 

14. Elders Edward W. Cox and John 
Stadler were requested to occupy the stage 
this day by preaching. 

15. The committees appointed on Sat- 
urday were now called on to report. The 
committee of finance reported that-^ 

There was in the hand? of the Trea- 
surer at the close of last 'Associa- 
tion the gum of $45 90 

Paid for printing the Minutes 

of last year, - $%$ 00 

For superintending the print- 
ing &. distribution as usual, 10 00 

— 35 00 



Now in the hands of theTreasurer, $13 90 j 
Received in contribuiions from the 

churches at this Association, 37 65\ 



Making §51 55 ! 

The Association concurred with the re-, 
port 

16. Elder Blount Cooper, who was ap- 
pointed to write to the White Oak Associ- 
ation, handed in a letter, which was read 
and approved. 

17. Brother Robert D. Hart handed inj 
a letter to the Little River Association, 
which was read and approved, and ap-i 
pointed brethren Robert D. Hart and 
James S. Battle to bear the same. 

18. Elder C. B. Hassell handed in a. 
letter to the Contentnea Association, 1 
which was read and approved, and j 
appointed Elders William Hyman and] 
John H. Daniel, and brethren John Bry-j 
an and William Thigpen to bear the 
same. . 

1 9. Resolved, that Elders John H. Dan- j 
iel, C. B. Hassell and Geo. W. Carrowan, 
and brother Wilson W. Mizell, be ap- 
pointed our messengers to the Country 



Line Association, and that they carry £• 
copies of our Minutes. 

20. Resolved, that the Clerk be direct- 
ed to forward to Abbott's Creek Union 
Association 25 copies of our Min- 
utes. 

21. The committee appointed to exam- 
ine the Circular Letter reported, that they 
had performed their duty and recommend 
the reading of the same; it was read, ap- 
proved, and ordered to be attached to 

j these Minutes. 

22. Resolved, that our next Associatioa 
| be held with the church at Williams's 
' meeting house, Edgecombe county, to 
I commence on Saturday before the first 
| Sunday in October, A. X). 1846; and that 
j Elder Blount Cooper be requested to 

preach the Introductory Sermon, and in 

| case of failure, Elder John H. Daniel; 

worship to commence at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

23. Elder C. B. Hassell was appointed 
to write a Circular Letter for the next As- 
sociation, 

24. The following query was received, 
read, and debated, Is it agreeable to the 
word of God for a church that has no male 
member, to ask visiting brethren to assist 
them to hold a conference, and receive and 
baptise members? Answer. Yes. 

26. Resolved, that the fund left in the 
hands of the Treasurer as a fund to defray 
the expenses of delegates, be paid over to 
the different churches that contributed to 
that fund. 

26. The following query was presented 
on Saturday, and read this dzy, and on 
motion was laid on the cable, Does the 
Kehukee Association believe in a gospel 
debt? 

27. Resolved, that brother Joseph D. 
Biggs be requested to prepare these Min- 
utes for the press,, superintend the printing 
thereof, and have 700 copies printed, and 
record one copy on the Association rec- 
ord, and distribute them as usual, and that 
he be allowed $10 for his services. 

The Association then adjourned with an 
exhortation and prayer. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Mod'r. 
Jos. D. Bi&gs, Clerk. 



CIRCULAR LETTER, j A covenant, is generally conceded to 

The Kehukee Baptist Association noiv j be, a contract, or an agreement between 
in session tvith the church ah Cross j twos or more parties embracing certain 
Ttrvak." ( ffiflvp.cnrn.hp. 



Roads meeting hSuse {Edgecombe conditions; and when proposed among in- 



county) to the brethren and sisie7 , s 
throughout her hounds. 
Beloved in Christ Jesus, chosen of 
God and called: Through the kind in- 



dividuals, each party has the right and 
power to refuse or accept the terms offer- 
ed; but when God is a party, it is incon- 
sistent with his omnipotence and sove- 



dulgence of our heavenly Father, we have j reignty, to have the terms proposed by a 
again been permitted to assemble in our I creature; neither can whatever God pro- 
associate capacity; and whilst error, del u- \ I )0Ses > be rejected without injury resulting 
sion, and falsehood are sweeping over our I to the person or persons, thus refusing 
land as with the besom of destruction, we j compliance; and here we proceed to no- 
feel to rejoice that we are so highly favor- 1 tice the subject proposed after that man- 
ed as to address those whom we have | ner > in which our ability and the circum- 
great reason to believe adhere to and are [scribed limits of a Circular Letter will per- 
contending for the glorious truths of the j mit us to °-o. 

gospel— worshipping the only true and J First then; there was a covenant of 
living God, and contending for the faith [works, -the terms of which were, do and 
which was once delivered to the saints. " j live > s » n and die— and this first covenant 

U writing to you, beloved, this our j Was proposed and made by our supreme 
yearly epistle, w* shall confine ourselves ] lawgiver with Adam, the common repre- 
raore immediately to the subject of the j sentative and father of mankind, who by 
two covenants so frequently mentioned j transgression fell from the primeval state 
and alluded to, in the volume of inspira- 1 of uprightness in which he was created, 
iion; and shall ©ndeavor so to address you and brought death into the world and all 
as (we hope) to strengthen the weak ! our wo ; and being his posterity, we are 
hands, confirm the feeble knees, and com- j ourselves transgressors against God and 
fort thoso that, mourn. j his holy law > b y Adam's sin being impu- 

While in the common Providence of^ tons. Hence we read, Rom. 5 c. 12 
God, his mercies and blessings are extend- ! i>: " Wherefore as by one man sin entered 
&\ to all his works of creation, to men, \ ' inio the world and death by sin; and so 
beasts, fowls and insects; causing the earth death passed upon all men, for that all 
to send forth her treasures from time to have sinned." Immediately after the 
tisne for their supply; feeding the raven 'flood God made a covenant of safety with 
and swine which toil not, neither spin, as Noah and his family, the beasts, birds, &c. 
well as the peasant and the monarch; yea °f the earth, importing that the earth 
his covenant mercy as contemplated in should never more be drowned with wa- 
our subject, is restricted to his works of ter, and that day and night, summer and 
grace, and his providential care for, his winter, seed time and harvest, should 
chosen and peculiar people; for whom he f rom age to age return in their order; of 
has ever evinced a regard, above that this the rainbow was the seal, Gen. 9 c. 
shown to the world of mankind in gene- j 13 v - : " X do sct m Y bcw in the cloud, and 
rat These we shall notice for the pre- j it shall be for a token of a covenant be- 
sen| as national and spiritual Israel; which [ tween me and the earth." 8. 22. "While 
brings us to the language of our text, ileb. ; the earth remaineth, seed time and har- 
8 c. S v.: "Behold the days come, saith j vest, cold and heat, summer and winter, 
the Lord, when I will make a new cove- j &*f M night, shall not cease. God made 
nant with the house of Israel and house of ; a covenant of property with Abraham, im- 



Judah; in that he saith a now covenant, he 
hath njade t>e first old." 



I 



plying that his seed should be numerous 
and havQ Canaan for their inheritance-^ 



S 



9 



this h« likewise confirmed to Isaac and 
Jacob, descendants of Abraham. Hence 
the text, 1 Chron. 16 c. 15 v.: "lie ye 
mindful always of his covenant, even of 
the covenant which he made wilh Abra- 
ham, and of his oath unto Isaac, and hath 
confirmed the same to Jacob for a law, and 
to Israel for an everlasting covenant; say- 
ing, unto thee will I give the land of Ca- 
naan, the lot of your inheritance." 

God made with the Hebrews a national 
covenant importing;, that he assumed them 
for his peculiar and chosen people or na- 
tion, and gave them the happy enjoyment 
of Canaan, on condition of their obedience 
to and observance of his laws and statutes. 
Hence the language of Moses to the Israel- 
ites, DeuU 4 c. 40 v.: "Thou shalt keep 
therefore his statutes and his command- 
ments which I command thee this day, 
that it may go well with thee, and with 
thy children after thee, and that thou may- 
est prolong thy days upon the earth, which 
the Lord thy God giveth thee, for ever. 

God made a covenant of royalty with 
David importing, that he and his family 
should be kings and governors of the He- 
brews, till the promised Messiah should 
spring from'. his loins, and be the everlast- 
ing king of his church, Ps. S5 c. 3, 4 vs.: 
"I have made a covenant with my chosen, 
I have sworn unto David my servant; thy 
seed will I establish forever, and build up 
thy throne to all generations." That the 
Old Testament (or covenant) writings and 
characters are typical of, and pointing to 
the New, a short recapitulation will plainly 
demonstrate. Adam our federal head and 
representative, in whom the world of man- 
kind was created, naturally, was a figure 
of the promised Messiah, in whom the 
church of Christ was created, spiritually, 
Rom. 5 c. 14 v.f Nevertheless death reign- 1 
ed from Adam to Moses, even over them I 
that had not sinned after the similitude of j 
Adam's transgression, who is the figure j 
of him that was to come." Again, 1 Cor. . 
15 c. 47 v.: "The first man is of the earth, 
earthy: the second man is the Lord from I 
heaven," &c. j 

The whole of the OttTeatempit (orj 



covenant) is one continued chain of pro 
pheeies, all referingto one stupendous and 
magnificent plan; the New, is the fulfil- 
ment and accomplishment of these pro- 
phecies. The Old Testament may be 
compared to the last gleaming twilight of 
a dying taper: in the language of Peter, to 
a light shining in a dark place. The New 
Testament, to the splendor of the sun at 
noon day. The Old Testament may be 
said to be the shadow, of which the New 
is the substance. 

National Israel, (the chosen of God un- 
der the old covenant of works) was typi- 
cal of and pointed to spiritual Israel und?r 
the covenant of grace* The obedience of 
national Israel constituted them righteous 
in the sight of God, while their disobedi- 
ence was considered sin and transgression. 
But their righteousness and justification, 
guilt and punishment, under the old cove- 
nant, did not look beyond this present 
life. To the testimony, Isaiah, 1 c. 19, 20 
vs.: "If ye be -willing and obedient, ye 
shall eat the good of the land; but if ye re- 
fuse and rebel, ye shall be devoured by the 
sword, for the mouth of the Lord hath 
spoken it." 

That is the good of the land of Canaan, 
which the Lord gave to Abraham and his 
seed as the lot of their earthly inheritance; 
which land national Israel was peaceably 
to possess and enjoy by their obedience to 
the laws of God given them, as a body 
politic. Again, Ezekiel, 33 c. 11 v.: "Say 
unto them, as I live saith the Lord God, I 
have no pleasure in the death of the wick- 
ed; but that the wicked turn from his way 
and live? turn ye, turn ye from your evil 
ways; for why will ye die, O house of Is- 
rael? Caleb and Joshua, we are informed, 
for the faithful discharge of the trust com- 
mitted to them, for bringing a correct and 
favorable report of the long-looked for Ca- 
naan, were permitted to reach and enjoy 
the good of the promised land; while Mo- 
ses, for his disobedience in smiting the 
rock in anger, was only permitted to view- 
it from Pisgah's height and dies. At the 
taking of Jericho, Achan (contrary to ex- 
press command) covets and takes a part of 



O 



the spoil. Offended with his crime and to 
defer others from the like wickedness, 
God marked his indignation hereat in the 
defeat of three thousand Hebrews at the 
battle of Ai, and the complete slaughter 
and death of thirty-six. 

The Hebrews intermarry with the Mo- 
abites, whereby their people become enti- 
ced to idolatry, which incurred the dis- 
pleasure of God; and the result was, the 
death of one thousand Hebrews by public 
execution, and twenty-three thousand 
more by a plague. The Israelites loathe 
the manna, and murmur against God; and 
fiery serpents are sent among them, the 
sting of which defied ail human skill. By 
attending strictly to the above circumstan- 
ces and testimony adduced, you will most 
assuredly discover, that the life and death 
- — righteousness and unrighteousness — re- ! 
wards and punishments, under the Old j 
Testament dispensation, were entirely of 
a temporal nature; but unfortunately, 
through the want of spiritual tuition, | 
through ignorance or design, til® two cov- j 
enants are so confounded, and the . scrip- 4 
tures of divine revelation so perverted 
from their proper meaning and intention,' 
as to produce much of the error — delusion . 
— strife and contention, that are abroad in ' 
our land. Divers other circumstances and j 
passages of scripture (of the above import) j 
might be here inserted, but these we deem j 
sufficient, to show the whole tenor of the j 
Old Testament, or covenant. 

The righteousness of the old covenant, ' 
which was of works, not being sufficient 
for justification in the sight of God and . 
happiness beyond the grave; even the j 
strictest observers thereof were saved by 
faith, as the scriptures plainly testify, lieb. | 
lie. 4, 17 vs.: "By faith Abel offered un- j 
to God a more excellent sacrifice than 
Cain by which he obtained witness that j 
lie was "righteous, God testifying of his 
gift, and by it he being dead yet speaketh." 
"By a faith Abraham when he was tried of- 
fered up Isaac^and he that had received 
the promises offered up his only begotten 
son/' These and the various other burnt 
offerings and sacrifices, offered up to the 



Lord in the infancy »l mankind, were nor 
only for the purpose of demonstrating 
that: without the shedding of blood there 
could be no remission of sins: but like- 
wise pointing out the great sacrifice which 
was to be made on Calvarifs crqss, which 
alone could take avva) 7 the sin of the world. 
The covenant of works, or the lawgiver at 
Mount Sinai, to national Israel, was noC 
only for the use of that nation under the 
Old Testament dispensation; but likewise 
for the use of God's church, or spiritual 
Israel, through all ages of the world as an 
instrument that the great Redeemer makes 
| use of to convince his elect of their sin — 
| misery and helpless condition, and of God's 
| awful majesty and justice as a supreme 
; lawgiver, and is emphatically their sehool- 
j master, to bring them to Christ. The law 
! given to national Israel at Mount Sinai, 
j was written on tables of stone; but the 
law given to spiritual Israel is impres- 
sed upon their minds, and written in 
their hearts, as we plainly discover, in 
Heb. S c. 10 v , which brings us to the sec- 
ond division of our subject: 4< For this is the 
covenant that I will make with the house 
of Israel, after those days, saiih the Lord, 
I will put my laws into their minds and 
write them in their hearts, and I will be 
to them a God, and they -shall be to me a 
people." 

In this new covenant of grace made 
with his unconditionally elected and eter- 
nally predestinated spiritual Israel of all 
nations, languages, tongues, kindred and 
people, God promises to renew them in 
the spirit of their mind, enlighten their 
understanding and make ihem savingly to 
discern the laws, doctrine and promises 
contained in his holy word; and by an al- 
mighty influence which Deity alone can 
exert, to impress upon their consciences, 
will, desires and affections, love to God, 
his saints and holiness, and a never ceasing 
desire to feel an unquenchable flame of that 
heavenly and divine principle glowing 
within: "I will be to them a God" — that 
is, being all to them and doing all for them 
that is necessary for their natural, spiritual 
and eternal happiness; and by his sove- 



■Feign and all-conquering grace, enable and 
determine them, to believe in, love, and 
devote themselves to him; and own and 
serve him as persons saved, redeemed, 
adopted and called by him; teaching them 
likewise that, he gives them, a full, free 
and irreversible pardon of all their sins, ac- 
tual rmd original, which they ever com- 
mitted or ever will commit, through the 
atoning righteousness of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, having promised to be merciful to 
their unrighteousness, and to remember 
their sins and iniquities no more. 

From eternity, God who viewed the 
end, from the beginning, foresaw our ruin, 
and before we fell in Adam, had settled 
the whole plan of our redemption in a cov- 
enant of grace. This covenant was made 
between God the Father — the infinite and 



sovereign Jehovah and his eternal Son, as 
our incarnate Redeemer, surety and ato- 
ning high priest; representing every in- 
dividual, that was chosen to everlasting 
life in him, Eph. 1 c. 4 v,: -"According as | 
he hath chosen us in him before the form- I 
dation of the world," &c. Under the Old 
Testament* this covenant of grace was ex- j 
temally administered by promises — pro-, 
phecies — sacrifices, &e. &c, — but under the : 
New, it is administered by the preaching 
of the gospel, baptism and the Lord's j 
supper. 

As it was inconsistent with the perfec- 
tions of Deity to recover a sinner, to the 
dishonor of God's holy law; the Son of 
God was required in our nature to take on 
himself the "seed of Abraham," to submit 
himself to the broken law and fulfil every 
demand of its penalty, as the condition of 
the eternal life of God's elect church or 
people. 

Having said that the Old "Testament 
scriptures abound in prophecies — figures 
and types, pointing to the New; we will 
now proceed in a concise way, to shew the 
analogy between the church in her Egyp- 
tian bondage and travel to the city of habi- 
tation in time; and the church under the 
gospel dispensation, while on her pilgri- 
mage to Jerusalem above. God was plea- 
ded to" represent the progress of bis ro- 
ll 



deemed church through the world, to their 
eternal inheritance, by the journey of the 
children of Israel through the wilderness 
from Egypt to Canaan. Here all the vari- 
ous steps of the redemption of the church 
by Christ, were represented from the be- 
ginning to its consummation in glory. 

The state they are redeemed from is re- 
presented by Egypt and their bondage, 
there, from which they were delivered by 
Moses as a means in the hand of God. 

The purchase of their redemption, by the 
sacrifice of the paschal lamb which was 
offered up the night in which God slew ali 
the first born of Egypt. 

The progress of the church through this 
evil world, and the various trials and chan- 
ging scenes through which it passes, was 
represented by the journey of the Israel- 
ites through the wilderness. 

The manner of their being conducted by 
the spirit of Christ, was represented by the 
Israelites being led by the pillar of cloud 
by day and pillar of fire by night. 

The manner in which the church is sup- 
plied with spiritual food and daily commu- 
nications from God whilst traveling thr6' 
this poor inhospitable world, was repre- 
sented by his supplying the children of 
Israel with manna from heaven and water 
out of the rock to supply their thirst and 
hunger. 

The dangers, difficulties, distresses and 
conflicts which befal the church in time, 
were represented by the fiery flying ser- 
pents and the various conflicts and battles 
which the children of Israel had with the 
Amalekites and others. These and many 
other circumstances which might be here 
noticed, arc lively images of what the 
saints or church of God meet with In all 
ages of the world, and that they were fig- 
urative or typical is manifest from 1 Cor. 
10 c. 11 v.: "Now all these things hap- 
pened unto them for ensamples, and they 
are written for our admonition, upon 
whom the ends of the world are come." 

The apostle is doubtless, speaking of 
the very things which we have here men- 
tioned (or alluded to;) as he says express- 
ly that they happened to them for types. 



8 



And now dear brethren and sisters in the I of a sin-avenging God in the day of yom> 
Lord; after having only glanced (as it' extremity; yet we pray you, remember 
were) at the subject to which we wish your; that it is through much tribulation that 
attention directed, we proceed to close you must go to your heavenly Canaan; 
this epistle, by a few words of exhortation I but "they that trust in the Lord shall be as 
and encouragement to you: as Christ's • Mount Zion, which cannot be removed; 
poor, oppressed and afflicted people, j but abideth forever." 
Has the Lord, with a high hand and out- j The unprecedented march of the cliil- 
stretched arm, led you forth by the right; dren of Israel through the Red Sea; their 
way, from under the reign and dominion I march across the great river Jordaii at a 
of sin and satan— your heavy taskmasters; time when it overflowed its banks — the 
and loosed your Egyptian bondage? and has daily descent of manna from heaven for 
he brought you to see these Egyptian Cne- I forty years, by which more than two 
mies overthrown in the Dead Sea of the j millions of people were richly fed — the 
death and sufferings of a crucified and risen fall of the^ walls of Jericho at the sound of 
Hedeemer; while by the same means you I rams' horns — Gideon's conquest of a nu- 
have been enabled to make your escape? merous host, with only three hundred 
has God ever brought you to the foot of Si-! men having no other weapons than lamps 
naPs mount, and there revealed himself to and pitchers — the standing still of the sun 
you, in such awful majesty, as utterly to in the midst of heaven at the command of 
convince you by the sovereignty and jus- . Joshua — the wondrous achievementi of 
tice of his holy Law, that there is no deal-' Sampson, who was endowed with super- 
ing with Him, without a mediator? and I natural strength — the miraculous preserva* 
have you seen such a distance between j tion of the three Hebrew children in the 
God and yourselves — such holiness and burning fiery furnace, and of Daniel in the 
perfection in his law, as has made you flee den of lions, &c. &c. are such striking in- 
to him, who is the end of the law for righ- stances of the amazing power of God— his 
teousness, to every one that believeth? If love to and concern for hi§ chosen, pecu- 
90, then in deed and in truth has the Son liar and redeemed Israel of all ages, ae 
made you free, and you shall be free in- j should justly excite our admiration and 
deed. This is God's way of dealing with praise; and should encourage ua to trust 
his children, first, to make them groan an- and confide in a God of such matchless 
der the load of sin and guilt; and then, to power, goodness and mercy for all w« 
open up a way for their escape, by the need whilst journeying through this wil» 
death and blood of the sin-atoning Lamb: derness of ivo, to Jerusalem above. Then 
Yea, he maketh sore and bindeth up; he: cheer up, ye saints of the most high God; 
woundeth, and his hands make whole, raise up your drooping heads, ye mourn- 
Notwithstanding the enemies which were j ers in Zion; gird on your armor, ye sol- 
overthrown on the day of the deliverance j diers of the cross; take the helmet of sal- 
of the Israelites from their Egyptian bon-< vation, the shield of faith, and the sword 
dage, were completely destroyed in the 1 of the Spirit, which is the word of God; 
Red Sea, so that they were permitted to j and continue your warfare with renewed 
harass them no more forever; yet amidst , vigor against the world, the flesh, and the 
their anthems of praise to the Lord fcny devil, and spiritual ivickedness in high 



having so triumphantly delivered them; 
they were soon brought to repine at the 
bitter waters of Marah; and although you 
may have been enabled to sing the song 
of deliverance to the God of your salva- 
tion, for having relieved you from the ter- 
rorg of a guilty conscience and the wrath 



places. Never put off your armor, nor 
look for durable peace, till you close your 
eyes in death; for as your strength, and 
hope, and faith, and consolations are in- 
creased; so may you expect heavier trials, 
and severer conflicts, while in an enemy '« 
land. 



Tears may indeed now and then furrow 
your cheeks, and anguish distract your 
hearts, whilst passing through the perplex- 
ing trials, tribulations, crosses and temp- 
tations which compose the deep waters, 
through which you are called to go. But 
the mountains shall depart and the hills he 
removed, but my kindness, shall not de- 
part from thee, neither shall the covenant 
of my peaee be removed, saith the Lord 
that hath mercy on thee, Isaiah, 54 c. 10 
v. Then bear up a. little longer under the 
oppression wherewith you are oppressed, 
and take courage by the way as you press 



You all would have lived; would have died 
too in sin; 
And sunk wiih the load of your guilt; 

What was there in you that couid merit es- 
teem, 
Or give the Creator delight; 
' Twas even so Father, you ever must 

sing, 
• Because it seemed good in thy sight. 

Then give all the glory to his holy name, 

To him aH the <-, lory belongs; 
Be it ever your joy still to sound forth his 
praise. 

And crown him in each of your songs. 

Adieu, dear brethren and sisters in 



forward to your heavenly patrimony.! Ch 



nst. 



Yea, we repeat, 

In songs of sublime adoration«and praise, 
Ye pilgrims for Zion, who ''press," 



Soon our spiritual Joshua will 



ead us safe across the Jordan of death to 
>ur everlasting inheritance; where no 
tumultuous passions, anxious cares and 



Break <forth and extol the great ancient off changing dispensations shall disturb our 



days, 
For rich and distinguishing grac«. 

HJs love, from eternity fixed upon you, 
Broke forth and discovered its flame, 

When each with the chords of his kind- 
ness he drew, 
And brought you to love his great name. 

0! had he not pitied the state you were 
in, 
Your bosoms his love had ne'er felt^ 



repose to all eternity. But where our 
sighs will be turned into songs of everlas- 
ting deliverance; our warfare into victory; 
and our labor into that rest, which re- 
mains for the Israel of God. 



F 7 -in led at the Primitive Baptist office. 



m 






MINUTES 



OF THE 



Kehukee Baptist Association, 

HELD AT 

Williams's m. h. Edgecombe County, IV. €* 

Commencing Saturday before the 1st Sunday in October, A. D. 1848* 



SATURDAY, Oct. 3rd, 1846. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was deliv- 
ered by Elder Blount Cooper, from 1st 
epistle of Peter, 5 chapter and 8, 9, and 10 
Verses. 

2. The delegates from the several chur- 
ches then assembled, and the Association 
was opened with prayer by Elder C. B. 
Hassell, and proceeded to business; when 
Elder William Hyman was chosen Moder- 
ator, and Bro. Joseph D. Biggs Clerk, who 
called to his assistance Elder C. B. Hassell. 

3. Brethren in the ministry from sister 
Associations, (of the same faith and order,) 
were invited to seats with us, when Elders 
John Stadler from the Country Line; Jo- 
siah Smith and D. J. Mott, from the White 
Oak; Ichabod Moore and John Smith, from 
the Contentnea; and Burrell Temple, from 
the Little River Association, seated them- 
selves. 

4. On motion, the Rules of Decorum 
were read. 

5. Letters from 31 churches were hand- 
ed in, read, the names of the delegates en- 
rolled, and the representation stated in the 
table of churches. 

Elders Moore and Mott, were request- 
ed to occupy the stage to day. 

6.. Petitionary letters for membership 
in this Association were called for, but 
none were received. 

7. Letters of correspondence and cor- 



responding delegates Were called for, wheit 
a file of Minutes from the White Oak As* 
sociation Was handed in by their delegate. 
Elder Josiah Smith; Elder John Stadler 
handed in a file of Minutes from the Coun- 
try Line, and Elders Ichabod Moore and 
John Smith handed in a file of Minutes 
from the Contentnea Association. 

On motion, the following Preamble and 
Resolutions Were adopted: 

Whereas, that portion of the Circular 
Letter attached to our Minutes for the 
year 1844, treating on the subject of min- 
isterial support, has not been well received 
by some of our brethren, who have con- 
strued it differently from other some; 
therefore 

Resolved, That Ave wish it distinctly 
Understood, by all, that we disavow any 
intention in said Circular, to either build 
up or encourage a gospel ministry by un- 
lawful means; and that it is foreign to our 
design to predicate a preached gospel on a 
monied foundation. And as such seems 
to have been the inference drawn by some, 
we now frankly say to such, that we in- 
tended to declare no such sentiments by 
the adoption of said Circular Letter. 

Resolved, That we believe the minister 
of the gospel, to be the servant and ambas? 
sador of God; and as such must look imme- 
diately to his Lord and rnastenfor all kinds 
of support and reward, while in the exer* 



n 



cise of his vocation. But as in the wisdom 
of God he designs to give temporal sup- 
port to his ministering servant, through 
the medium of the church, (and not super- 
naturally as he does spiritual aid>) there- 
fore the minister may indirectly look to 
the church for that kind of encouragement, 
and it is the bounden duty of the church 
to attend to it, being thereunto required 
by the laws of her king. 



Individual members of the church being 
moved by the Holy Spirit of God to ad- 
minister to the temporal necessities of hi3 
ambassador, not by constraint' or grudg- 
ingly, but of a ready and willing mind* 
by doing so, act under the direction of the 
Almighty, whose they are and whom they 
serve, and the minister thus receiving a 
portion of his reward, receives it> it is true* 
indirectly from the church, but directly 



Names of churches anil 

counties wherein 

situated* 



PASTORS AND DELE- 
GATES. 



33 fco b 

S* Cj- 1 Cr- 



1 Beargrass, Martin county ,\\] m.\\' hi.ta.ker, David Woolard, 

2 Blount's Cr'k,i?eau/br/,-f ( 

3 Conoho, Martin, ■ — (Blount CoopER,.TohnBryan, 

4 Concord, Washington, — Samuel Lewis,* Max. Tatum, 

5 Conetoe, Edgecombe, 'John H.Daniel, VVm. Thigpen, 
GCowenjock, Currituck,] Samuel Tatum, 

7 Cross Roads, Edgecombe, Wm. Hyman, Sov'n Purvisj, 

8 Cedar Island, Carteret, — Thosi Robason, 

9 Deep Creek, Halifax, — \\ 

10 Falls Tar River, Nash^ — ;J$si S. Battle, James S Battle, 

1 1 Flat Swamp, Pitt, — \ W, W.K.P!rilj)ut,iPage T.C nance 

12 Flatty Creek, Pasquo'k,-]®, B.Pendleton,* W.F.Banks,* 

13 Fishing Creek, Halifax, jW. Powell, Henry Nickels, 
14 Gum Neck, Tyrrell, — ilsaac Meekins, 

15 Great Swamp, Pitt, — |B«nj. Flemming, Wm. Shiver, 

16 Goose Creek, Beaufort, -James Potter, 

17 Joyner's, Northampton, — Thos. Joyner,* Isaac Outland,* 

18 Kehukee, Halifax, — Turner Brewer,* J no. Stamper, 

19 Lawrence's, Edgecombe,- Arthur Parker, John White, 

20 Little Alligator, Tyrrell,-\\ 

21 LMorattock, Washington,- W. W- Mizell, D, T, Ay res, 

22 North Creek, Beaufort?— Josi H» Clark, J no, Harrington 

23 Picot, Martin, — 

24 Powell's Point, Cur'k,— 

25 Pungo, Beaufort, — 

26 Rocky Swamp, Halifax, 

27 Sappony, Nash, — f 
28Scuppernong, Tyrrell,—] 
29 So, Mattamuskeet, Hyde, G.W.Carrowan, T. Bridgeman, 



ss. S; § 
o g 2 

2 &> S 



Aquilla Davis,* JiW.SatcheU,* 
Li Bi Bennett, S. Nickels** 



% 1 






$Cts 



30 Sandy Grove, Nash, — t 

31 Skewarkey, Martin, 

32 Sawyer's Ct'k, Camden-] 



[R.M. G.Moore,* 
C.B.Hassell,Jos D. Biggs, 
Wm. Forbes,* [Gardner, 

33 S01 Quay, So'ampton, Fu.jE. Harrison, J. J. Lawrence, A. L. 

34 Smithwick'sCr'k,Mar'ji-|john Hodges, D. Singleton, 

35 Sound Side, Tyrrell, — A. J. Swain,* Saml. Rogers, 



36 Spring Green, Martin, — 

37 Tarboro\ Edgecombe, — 

38 Washington, Beaufort,-] 

39 WhitePlains, Beaufort, 

40 Williams's, Edgecombe, - 



J. Griffin, Aldridge Andrews? 
Rob't D.Hart, Coffield King, 
Jacob Swindel,* L, Wallace, 
J. Wallace, A. Waters, J . BOwen, 
D. Bradley, Ed. Power, 



21 

I 

1 
43 
32 
28 
15 

ii 

35: 

16 

38 
50 
55 
2i 
16 
105 ( 
43, 

76 
36 



1 00 



Yearly 
meeting^ 
Sunday& 
Saturday 

before. 



3dinAug. 
3dihMar» 
IstinSepi 
4thinSep; 
3dinSepts 
3d in Mars 
2dinSept; 



75 
00 
25 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 

00 

75 
00 



2dinSept; 
lsiinSepi 
2dinNov; 
4thinSerJi 

3d iriSep; 
3dinSfept; 

4thinAug 



82 

I 
48 
13 
70 
17 
32 
30 
54 ! 
23 
28 
31 



50 

25 4th in Aug 
3dinAug* 
2d inJan. 
2dinAiig# 
3d in Aug.- 
IstinSepr 



29; 5 15 23 3510 1154 39 75 



2 00 



1 50 

2 00 
2 00 

75 



istinSepff 
2d inOcW 
2d in Aug* 

IstinJan^ 
4 thin Aug 

4th inSepr 
IstinAug 
istinAug 
IstinAug 

3d in Au IP- 



NOTE. Pastors of churches and other ordained ministers are in small capitals; unoFdained! 
ministers in italic; those marked thus * were not present; from churches marked thus f we receiv- 
ed no intelligence, in that case their number stands as last represented; dashes — denote no pastors^ 
the column before the last, shows the contributions from the churches to the Association fund ifai* 
year; the last column shows the yearly meetings of each church. 



s 



from God; whose servant and ambassador 
he is, and who is the great author of the 
whole movement. 

8. The following committees were ap- 
pointed, (viz:) Brethren James S. Battle 
and Robt. D. Hart on finance; Brethren, 
Stadler, Smith, Temple and Biggs and the 
writer, to examine the Circular Letter. 

9. Resolved, that we correspond by let- 



upon the child, and put his mouth upon 
his mouth, and his eyes upon his eyes, and 
his hands upon his hands, and he stretched 
himself upon the child, and the flesh of 
the child waxed warm." 

Elder John Stadler also followed and 
preached from 15 chapter of 1st Corin- 
thians, 25 and 26 verse's: "For he must 
reign till he hath put all enemies under his 
ier and delegates with the following Asso-j feet, the last enemy that shall be destroyed 



eiations; White Oak and Contentnea. Jno. 
H. Daniel was appointed to write to White 
Oak, and brother Hart to Contentnea. 
JO. The Minutes of the different Asso- 



is death. " 

MONDAY, Oct. 5th. 
The Association assembled, and was 
opened with prayer by Elder Blunt Coop- 



erations with which we correspond werejer. 



distributed to the delegates. 

11. On motion agreed that the name of 
the Sound Side church be changed to Beth- 
lehem. 

12. Elders Stadler, Temple, and Hassell 
were requested by private ballot to occupy 



The names of the delegates of this As- 
sociation were called over, and those ab- 
sent, marked as such in the table of chur- 
ches. 

Elders John Stadler and Burwell Tem- 
ple were requested to occupy the stage to 



the stage to morrow in preaching, and that; day in preaching. 

worship commence at 10 o'clock, A. M. The committees appointed on Saturday 

13. Queries were called for, when the : were called on to report. The committee 

following were read. I of finance reported that, 

Query. Does this Association think it ,.,, . ., , , Pi , ~* _ 

. J . 1 here was in the hands of the 1 rea- 

according to gospel order, to continue in sureF at lhe c , ose of Utft Agsocia _ 

fellowship with a church, whose members tion the sum of #51 5$ 

are in a state of such disorder that they are Paid for printing the Minutes 

not in a condition to commune, and yetj of last year, - $25 00 

continue in this state from year to year ' For superintending the prin- 

without taking the steps necessary to re- 



ting and distribution and 
recording one copy on 
record 10 00 



move the difficulty which prevents com- 
muning. 

Query. Is it consistent with the spirit j - 

of the gospel for an Old School Baptist to Now in the handsof the Treasurer, $16 55 
attach himself to the society called Odd ! Received in contributions from 
Fellows? * ne churches at this time^ 

The Association adjourned till Monday 



next, at 9 o'clock, A. M. with prayer by 
'Elder Josiah Smith. 

SUNDAY, Oct. 4th. 
Elder C. B. Hassell opened the services 



35 00 



39 75 



Making 



$56 30 



The Association concurred with the re- 
port and the committee were discharged. 
Elder John H. Daniel, who was ap- 



of the day and preached from 8 chapter j pointed to write to the White Oak Asso- 



John,and latter part of the 12 verse: "lam 
the light of the world, he that follow^ 
eth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall 
have the light of life." 

Elder Burrell Temple, followed and 

preached from 4 chapter of 2nd Kings, and brethren Robt. D. Hart and James S. 

and 34 verse. "And he went up and lay (Battle be appointed our messengers to the 



ciation, handed in a letter which was read 
and approved; and Elder Blount Cooper 
and Brethren Robt. D. Hart and John 
Bryan appointed to bear the same. 



Resolved, that Elder John H. Daniel 



Little River Association, and carry 25 co- 
pies of our Minutes. 

Brother Robt. D. Hart, handed in a let- 
ter to the Contentnea Association, which 
was read and approved; and appointed 
Brethren Wm. Thigpen, and R. D. Hart, 
and Elder John H. Daniel to bear the same. 
Resolved, that brother Robt. D.Hart 
and Elder Lemuel B. Bennett be appoint- 
ed our messengers to the Country Line 
Association, and that they carry 25 copies 
of our Minutes. 

Rosolved, that the Clerk be directed to 
forward to Abbott's Creek Union Associa- 
tion 25 copies of our Minutes. 

The committee appointed to examine 
the Circular Letter reported, that they had 
performed their duty and recommend the 
reading of the same; it was read, approved, 
and ordered to be attached to these Min- 
utes. 

Resolved, that our next Association be 
held with the church at Spring Green, m. 
h. Martin county, to commence on Satur- 
day before the first Sunday in October, A. 
D. 1847, and that Elder Wm. Hyman be 
requested to preach the Introductory Ser- 
mon, and in case of failure, C. B. Hassell; 
worship to commence at 11 o'clock, A.M. 
u A file of Minutes from Abbott's Creek 
Union Association was handed in and dis- 
tributed. 

On motion Resolved, that we appoint 
committees of investigation to visit the 
churches at Sappony, Sandy Grove, Little 
Alligator, Scuppernong, and Blount's 
Creek, to enquire into their condition and 
report to next Association; whereupon, 
brethren R. D. Hart, James S. Battle and 
Joseph S. Battle, were appointed a com- 
mittee for Sandy Grove and Sappony; and 
Brethren Arnet Waters, Samuel Rogers, 
and M. Tatum, were appointed the com- 
mittee for Little Alligator and Scupper- 
nong; and Elder W T m. Whitaker, and 
brethren David Singleton and James Pot- 
ter, were appointed the committee for 
Blount's Creek. 

Queries introduced on Saturday were 
again read and answered — No. 

Resolved, that brother Joseph D. Biggs 



be requested to prepare these Minutes for 
the press, superintend the printing thereof, 
have 700 copies printed, and record one 
copy on the Association record, and dis- 
tribute them as usual, and that he be allow- 
ed $10 for his services. 

The Association then adjourned with an 
address by the Moderator and singing. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, MocTr. 
Jos. D. Biggs, Clerk. 



CIRCULAR UETTER. 

The Elders and messengers of the Ke- 
hukee Association, now convened with the 
church at Williams's meeting house, 
Edgecombe county, N C, to the church- 
es they represent ; send Christian greeting. 

Dearly beloved in the Lord: Four- 
score years with all their mighty events, 
have forever passed away, since the forma- 
tion of our Association. And in view of 
the commotions, felt in the moral and phy- 
sical world, during this period of time; 
how exceedingly thankful to Almighty. God 
should we feel, on the present occasion, 
for that special grace and protection, which 
he hath given us and our predecessors, and 
for the perpetuation of our name and order, 
independent of all external and internal 
commotions, from the year 1765, down 
to the present time! 

Our coming together at this our annual 
meeting has been one of pleasantness and 
peace; and we humbly trust, a practical il- 
lustration of the object our predecessors 
had in view, when they first organized the 
"Kehukee Association " We think we 
have met in gladness, — deliberated in love, 
and are about to separate in peace; with 
this word of encouragement to you. 

There are two things we believe, that 
appertain to the Christian character, viz. 
Faith and Works. These in the economy 
of salvation, have been held, as inseparably 
united in the child of God: and in precise- 
ly the order in which they stand here; viz. 
Faith first and Works last. To change 
this order of the terms, wowJdl be to deviate 
from the word of God, reflect p$ te wis- 



dom and attack his system. And to exalt 
either one at the expense of the other, is a 
pretty sure way to prove the existence of 
neither, in the individual who attempts the 
achievement. Both must stand or fall to^ 
gether. For as faith without works is dead 
being alone James, 2. I 7, even so works 
without faith is also dead, Heb. 9. 14 and 
11. 6. Therefore what God hath joined 
together let not man put asunder. 

First then of faith. What is faith? 
"Faith is the substance of things hoped for, 
the evidence of things not seen. Heb. 9. 1. 
Faith is the gift of God. Eph. 2 8. Faith 
is that in the believer, which "is counted 



Holy Ghost and" that "these three are one. 

1 John, 5. 7. And that this God is engag- 
ed in the salvation of his people; neither 
does it allow of any other God. Isaiah, 
48 9,10, 11. 45.22. Col. 2. 2. Faith 
receives the Old and New Testament as 
the word of God, and believes all scripture 
to be given by inspiration of God and to be 
"profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for 
correction, for instruction in righteousness? 
that the man of God may be perfect, thor- 
oughly furnished unto all good works. " 

2 Tim. 3. 16, 17. 

Therefore it is an evidence of faith in US 
to believe that God from all eternity knew 



for righteousness" to him. Rom. 4. 5; 9 \ that man would fall from his created right- 
30 and 10. 16. Faith also stands for jus- ; eousness, and without gome heavenly in- 3 
tification to the believer; who by it appro- terposition would sink into endless ruin-— 
hends Christ, "who was delivered for our that he determined the eternal salvation of 



offences, and was raised for our justifica- 
tion. Therefore being justified by faith, 



a portion of this fallen class of beings, in 
consequence of his eternal love for them; 



we have peace with God through our Lord and therefore gave them to his Son and 
Jesus Christ; by whom also we have ac- j prepared a place for them in heaven before 
cess by faith into this grace wherein we the foundation of the world. 1 John, 3. 
stand and rejoice in the hope and glory of 2d. Acts 4. 12. Matthew, 1. 21. and 25. 
God." Rom. 4 25 and 5. 1,2. Faith is "34. Jer.31.3. John, 1 7. 2, 24. That when 
a firm belief in the Lord Jesus Christ, as! in eternity God's chosen people were giv- 



being the Son of God and also the son of 
man. As being the "wonderful counsel 
lor, the mighty God, the everlasting Fath- 
er and the Prince of peace. " Isaiah, 9. 16, 
and also the tender offspring of Mary, wrap- 
ped in swaddling cloths and laid in a man 
ger. Luke, 2. 19. As being possessor of 
heaven and earth, the infinitely great God, 
almighty creator and supreme ruler of the 
universe, without variation or the shadow 
of a turn. 1 Cor. 10 26. John, 1. 3. 
James 1. 17; and also the despised Naza- 
rene, "made of a woman, made under the 
law, to redeem them that were under the 
law." Gal. 4. 4, 5 Faith is a firm be- 
lief in Christ as the atoning sacrifice for 
our sins, and is a perfect reliance on him 



en the son, grace was given the people; 
and they, consequently were elected in 
Christ and predestinated unto eternal life: 
— by and through which theirs becomes 
an eternal salvation,, though only manifest- 
ed to them after time began,— according to 
the saying of the apostler "God who hath 
saved us and called us, with a holy calling, 
not. according to our works, but according 
to his own purpose and grace which was 
given us in Chr'st Jesus- before the world 
began; but is now male manifest by the 
appearing of our Saviour Jesus Christ, 
who hath abolished death and hath brough 
life and immortaiity to light through the 
gospel." 1 Tim. 1. 9, 10. And again, 
Peter to the brethren says, "Elect accord-* 



for life and salvation and all the blessings ing to the foreknowledge of God the Fath- 
of this world and that which is to come, er, through sanctification of the Spirit, unto 
Rom. 8. 32. PsalmsS4.il. Faith appre obedience and sprinkling of the blood of 
hends God as subsisting in a trinity of per- Jesus Christ." 1 Pet J. 2. And again 
sons called "the Father, the Word and the Paul to the Ephesiaos, 1. 4, 5; "Ac- 



fording as he hath chosen us in him 
before the foundation of the world. 1I1 ■-•■ 
we should be holy and without blame be 
fore him in love; having predestinated, u> 
unto the adoption of children by Jesu; 
Christ to himself according to the gooc* 
pleasure of his will." 

It is an evidence of faith to believe that 
all those thus ordained to eternal lift-, shall 
believe in Christ, grow in grace ami never 
fall finally away; but on the contrary be 
♦'kept" in Christ by the power of Goo 
through faith unto salvation, ready to be 
revealed in the last time. Acts. 13.-48. 2 
Pet. 3. 18. John, 6. 54 and 10. 23. Phil. 
1.6. I Pet. 1. §. 

Faith therefore, io say nothing at pres 
ent of various other points of (io.tn, e, at 
'east includes these, viz: Elect ion and pre, 
destination and the final persever nice o 
the sainis in grace. These; are bright and 
prominent pillars in the temple of faith: 



or obsolete* And priestcraft, by the pro- 
mulgation of a yariet> of wishey-washey, 
lirisey vvoolsey, ring streaked and speckled 
kinds of doctrines and commandments of 
men; all in opposition to the Christian 
fajth; have produced a host of false wor- 
shippers throughout the length and breadth 
of many so called Christian lands, who are 
ready un!e>s grace interposes to -join the 
standard of. the beast, whose deadly wound 
is healed, and who will again shortly come 
forth to battle against the Saints of the mo«>t 

Bui beloved ye have no*, so learned Christy 
as to forsake him in the hour of danger; 
and although your professions of friendship 
lo him may not be the loudest of all others, 
yet we bejjeve them genuine, and that von 
will stand by 'he cause. of your Redeemer, 
anil contend lor his truth and his honor 
down to i he latest period of your lives. 
1"hen when the hour of conflict arrives. 



and were it possible io remove them, fajth ! w hen antichrist shall again lead forth 
j'self would be destroyed by tumbling into j his'armjes agajpsi the Lord and his chose'rij 
ruins. Any pretension to fait)}, therefor eJi-'or they will be led fori h,) if within our 
where these^points are rejected is a sure day ? we shall expect to see your Christian, 
indicative of a dead faith, anyone which js profession shine brighter and brighter, 
not according to the gospel of God, j while marching triumphantly to the fire s 

And these points which are very begopn I the faggpt, the stake, the inquisition, the 
lights and polar stars to the Thrisijan mar- | rack, the torture and the torments of sa- 



iner, pointing him to the fair haven of 1 
eternal rest; become overhanging cliffs 
and a>vful breakers to the uri-ki ii u) pilot, 
against which his frgi) birk is dashed.-fo 
pieces. Fashion so rules the hour and 
falsehood so exalts itself in this our dzy 
and generation, that judgment is turned 
awgy backward and justice standeth afar 
off", truth is fallen in the street and equit\ 
cannot enter, isaiah, 59. 14, 

Many who profess to haye evangelical 
faith are either unwilling or afraid to ad- 
vance these truths: thereby proving them 
selves recreant to the cause of Christ and 
virtually planting themselves within the 
ranks of the enemy. They attempt to 
bring the doctrine of the gospel into disre- 
pute, by causing the opinion to prevail 



tau's emissaries, saying as \e go, «• ! hank§ 
be io God which giyeth us l he victory 
through our Lord Jtsus Christ." 1 (or. 

15. 57; 

So .« e desire to stir up your pure minds 
by way of remembrance, to a rpngwecl con- 
templation/of these things and to the great 
importance, of strong and abiding faith in 
the Son of God, That lively and evangel- 
ical, holy, deep and abiding, high and lofty 
faith pf which we have been treating, is a 
great thing in peace; and if possible a still 
greater in war. For when conflicts arise 
it shines more conspicuously, and whether 
i hey come from within or from without, 
in life or in death, it inspires a hope which 
is to the soui as an anchor both sure and 
steadfast — Heb. 6. 19. and enables thq 



that it is either uncharitable, unprofitable. llian of faith whii* grappling even with the 



king of terrors to ery out, "0 death where 
is t hy sling? Q grave were is thy victo- 
ry?" 1 Cor. 15. 55, God's people an 
ciently "through faith, subdued kingdoms, 
wrought righteousness, obtained promises, 
stopped the moulds of lions, quenched the 
vioje^ce of fire, escaped the edge of the 
S,word, out of weakness were made strong, 
waxeij valiant in fight, turned to flight th' j 
armies qf ih£ alien's" — Heb. 11. 33, 34. 
And Jhe children of God now and hereafter 
thfOUfih like precious faith shall be enabled 
to accomplish like wonders and come off 
more than conqueror?* with the great cap 
tain pf their salvation. 

Secondly of works. What are works? 
Good vyorks, negatively are not of that 
character exhibited by men in a state of na- 
ture. Not one d#ed ever yet performed 
by man of hirr self and while in nature, 
since the fall, can be denominated a good 
work. This is obvious from the fact that 
all men since the transgression, are fallen; 
are evil ana 1 that continually; are all gone 
out of the way ; there are none good, no 
not one — Gen. 6. 5. Rom. 3 12. Matt. 
19. 17. Seeing therefore no man is good, 
it follows as a matter of course that no 
works of man can be good. No proposi- 
tion it seems to us can be more plain to 
£he human understanding than this, and 
nothing more reasonable, allowing the 
£ruth of the scriptures, See Matt. 15. 19. 
and If. 3$. James 3 r Jl'l, 12. 

41) the works of all carnal men, either 
separately or combined, are incompetent 
£o beget faith or save a soul. In the mat- 
ter of eternal salvation they do not amount 
jLo a feather's weight and are not worth the 
paper on which we write this letter. Like 
their original author, they are forever evil 
and according to God's holy word, must 
ever be denominated bad works, dead 
works, and deeds of ungodly men which 
they have ungodly committed. John, 8. 
4. 4. Jude, 15 verse. 

These things are premised, in order to 
remove the rubbish and open the way for 
f,he introduction of the main subject which 



is "Good works" in the positive form. 
Affirmatively then, good works are of 
that character which properly belong to, 
and are manifested in the lives of the liv- 
ing in Jerusalem. God is not the God of 
the dead but of the living. The living — 
the living — those who have been made 
alive from the dead and are alive for ever- 
more --these are they and these only of all 
the sons of men. who can' live, moye and 
have their Ijeing in the spiritual kingdom 
of Christ, and who are competent to the 
performance of works acceptable to him — 
Isaiah 4. 3. and 38. IS. Matt. 21 32 and 
5. 16. Ephesians 2. 1,0. Titus 2. 14. 
these people therefore are exhorted by 
the good word of God to abound in good 
works, inasmuch as they are able to per- 
form them — these are encouraged to be 
up and doing — to work while it is day — to 
flee idolatry — to sleep not on the watch- 
tower — to avoid defilement — to touch not 
the unclean thing— to keep their garments 
unspotted from the world — to become bea- 
con lights, ensamples and patterns to oth- 
ers — to adorn the doctrine of God their 
Saviour,, and to woik out their salvation 
from the errors and delusions of the world 
with fear and trembling: ever bearing in 
mind that it is God who worketh in them 
'•both to will and to do of his good pleas- 
ure.'' Titus, 2. 10. and 3. 8. Eph. 6. 6. 
I Thess. 5 5. 8. 1 Cor. 10. 14. Matt. 5. 
14. and 24.42. Mark, 13. 37. Col. 2. 21. 
Phil. 2 12 13. These and many other 
things we might name, are what we term 
good works, and they are certainly good 
and profitable to men. 

These exhortations are boih scriptural 
and reasonable. They are scriptural as 
hath appeared by the references above 
made. And it is no disparagement to the 
church of God, therefore, or departure 
from the doctrine of the gospel to make a 
frequent repetition of them. '-For precept 
must be upon precept, precept upon pre- 
cept; line upon line, line upon line; here a 
little, and there a little." Isaiah, 28. 10. 
And Ptter, addressing the household of 



8 



faith, says— «' Wherefore the rather breth- 
ren, give diligence to make your calling 
and election sure; for if ye do these things 
ye shall never fall; for so an entrance shall 
be administered unto you abundantly, into 
the everlasting kingdon of our Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ; Wherefore I will 
not be negligent to put you always in re- 
membraneeof these things, though ye know 
them and be established in the present 
truth. " 2 Pet. 1. 10, 11, 12. Here we 
find the apostle declaring that the brethren 
knew the things about which he was writ- 
ing, and were established in the truth; 
nevertheless he deems it expedient to call 
their attention to them again, and urge 
them onward to diligence in the service of 
their Redeemer. So it is not because we 
like you the less, brethren, but because we 
love you the more, that we exhort you in 
the name of our Lord to abound in good 
works— yea, to continue steadfast in that 
work of faith and labour of love and pa- 
tience of hope, in our Lord Jesus Christ, 
in which primitive saints abounded, who 
were declared by the apostle Paul to be 
the elect of God at the same time. 1 Thess. 
1. 3,4. 

These exhortations are reasonable, be- 
cause they are addressed to those who can 
understand them, appreciate their impor- 
tance and comply with their demands 
Temporally speaking, if we say to a dead 
man "rise up and walk" we shall be guilty 
of an absurdity, because he neither hears 
or is able to comply with the command, 
and it is not our prerogative to raise the 
dead. But if we should say to a living 
man "rise up and walk, run, sit or talk" 
we act reasonably, inasmuch as he can both 
hear and comply. Even so in spiritual 
matters; if we urge the dead in trespasses 
and sins, to move onward in the divine life, 
to "row in grace and work out their salva- 
tion with fear and trembling; we shall be 
using words in vain and the exhortation 
will fall lifeless at their feet: because they 
have no ears to hear, eyes to see, or hearts 



doctrine of our Lord Jesus Christ, in that 
spiritual kingddm which is not of this 
world. Mark 4. 12. Hut let these exhor- 
tations be made to the living -to those 
who have been made alive by a quickening 
spirit — to those who have experienced the 
new birthj and have been translated from 
the dark domain of satan into the bright 
and glorious kingdom of the Prince of 
peace, and there is no absurdity involved 
— there is a proper reasonableness and fit- 
ness of things, that come aptly to the com- 
prehension of all judicious minds: because 
the exhortation in such instance comes to 
those who Can both appreciate and comply. 
For want of a proper discrimination 
here, a large portion of the professing 
world have made shipwreck of themselves. 
They first set sail under the false colors of 
original perfection, and by the flattering 
breezes of popular favor are wafted onward 
in their career, they are lost m unknown 
seas, and at length are entirely swallowed 
up in the vortex of that Maelstrom of satan> 
called "do and live," which has spread the 
boundaries of its impetuous whirl far and 
wide, and roared most awfully in the sea of 
human life, ever since the great transgres- 
sion. 

But we are addressing the living men irr 
Jerusalem, who are of u ihe circumcision, 
which worship God in the spirit, and re- 
joice in Christ Jesus and have no confi- 
dence in the flesh." Phil. 3. 3 Those who- 
have tried enough of doing to live, and 
who now by the grace of God are "living 
to do," and who through love to God, and 
not through servile fear desire to walk "in 
all the commandments and ordinances of 
the Lord blameless." Luke I. 6 Those 
who are created in Christ Jesus unto good 
works, which God hath before ordained 
they should walk in them. Eph, 2. 10. 

As such we address you, beloved, not in 
a dictatorial spirit or as those who have au- 
thority over you; for the former we de- 
precate and the latter we disclaim; but in 
that spirit of brotherly kindness and for- 



to understand, the voice, the beauty, or the | bearance, which one disciple of Jesus should 



ever cherish towards another. Let us not 

then be found imparting more advice, than 

we are willing to receive, either, when we 

say that it is an evidence of our abounding 

in good works, when we are at peace one 

with another, and have only one Lord, one 

faith, and one baptism to our profession. 

Eph. 4. 5. When we bear "one anothers 

burdens and so fulfil the law of Christ." 

Gal. 6 3. When we "love one another 

with a pure heart fervently.'' 1 Pet. 1. 

22. When we speak evil of no man, are 

not found brawlers, but are gentle, showing 

all meekness to all men and ready to every 

good work. Titus, 3 1,2. When we 

pray in our families and live a godly, 

righteous and sober life, before our children 

and servants. Psalms, 92. 2. Titus 2. 12 

When we do not neglect the assembling 

ourselves together in a church capacity, but 

are regularly occupying our proper places long as they subserve the purposes of their 

in the house of God, and improving the i organization. In such case, brethren 

talents given us of the Lord, to do all | should not be hasty to repudiate them, but 

things therein decently and in order, to the i ready to protect and defend them. 

honor of God and the prosperity of Zion- j If they should transcend their limits, 

Heb. 10.25. 1 Cor. 14. 20. When we ! grow despotic, or become tyranical in their 



1 Pet. 5. 1, 2, 3. 2 John, 9. 10, 11. 1 
Tiro. 3. 2, 3,4, 5. 1 Titus 1. 7, 8, 9. 

It is an evidence beloved of our abound- 
'ng in good works, when we are found 
ready to share the burdens of the church in 
all lawful matters; particularly when we 
readily administer to the necessities of the 
saints. 1 Cor. 16. 1, 2, 3. And freely 
contribute of our carnal things to those 
who administer to us in spiritual things. 
1 Cor. 9. 11. And when we esteem such 
very highly in love for their works' sake, 
who are over us in the Lord, laboring 
with and admonishing us in things heaven- 
ly and divine. 1 Thess. 5. 12, 13. It is 
also a good work to stand fast by the land- 
marks of our forefathers and not allow 
them to be removed. Associations are one 
of those landmarks, and therefore let Asso- 
ciations be honored and perpetuated, so 



quench not the spirit, and despise not pro- 
phesyings; but rejoice evermore, pray 
without ceasing, and in every thing give 
thanks — knowing this to be the will of 
God in Christ Jesus concerning us. 1 
Thess. 5. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20. When we 
do not look up too much to others to go 
forward in church business, but consider 
ourselves individually charged wiih a re- 
sponsibility there, which must be met and 
a duty which must be performed. Luke, 
12. 47 John, 7. 24. Matt. IS 15, 16, 17, 
IS. When we hold up the hands of our 
minister. Exodus 17. 12, and guard 
his reputation well, that he may "have a 
good report of ihem which are without; 
lest he fall into reproach and the snare of 
the devil." 1 Tim. 3. 7. When we look 
well into his moral character, and examine 
well the doctrine he advances; and provid- 
ed he is deficient in either, advise him as a 
brother, entreat him as a father and warn 
him of the danger that lies before him. See 



nature, then of course they must be brought 
to terms or abandoned by the churches. \ 
union or Association of churches, is but 
the creature of the churches, and of course 
must perish whenever they withdraw their 
support; which they have always the orig- 
inal and reserved right to do. We think 
it ranging high in orthodoxy to say, that 
each and every well regulated church of 
God, is the highest ecclesiastical authority 
in the world, and was never intended by 
the great head of the church, to be forced 
into measures contrary to its will, by eith- 
er, conventions, councils, boards, or Asso- 
ciations. Yetthe remark is no less true, 
that from the earliest ages of Christianity, 
down to the present time, there has ever 
existed a desire on the part of individual 
churches, to associate, to correspond with 
each other, and to send letters and messen- 
gers to one another: in order, apparently 
to cherish a more extensive brotherly ac- 
quaintance — to enlarge the labors of the 



Hk 



mJnfckry— -fahear of each others* welfare — 
to seek edification in the things of the king- 
dom and to preserve uniformity of faith 
and works, throughout the bound? of the 
Catholic or Universal church of God, so 
far as time, place aryi, circumstances vvotild 
allow. 

We feul the- beginni ng, of this recorded 
in, the fifteenth, chapter of the acts of the 
apostles, (-.vb.ich book is the. best commen- 
tary on the gospels,, in the world, and we 
can do very well without any o&her*) but, 
the end is. not yet, for like customs will 
prevail, among God's people, from genera 
tion, to generation, in ages, yet to come. 
Then, brethren, seek to cherish this annu ; 
al assembling of yourselves together, by 
affectionate epistles and faithful delegate*. 
The more effectually to. insuretheperpetu 
ity of your Association, be sure to guard 
against all its encroachments, keep it with- 
in the line of d\ity % the path of humility, 
and shorn of alt unjawful powers,; then will 



it stand upon the strongest of aW founds-. 
tions, viz: love. For if it has your affec- 
tions it lives; without which it- dies* If" 
well conducted it has your affections. It 
hath been so, conducted and ,we trust will 
continue so to be,, a.s an . ndvisa»y council off 
many churches, strengthening and' increase 
ing in your confidence and good wishes. 

Brethren, farewell.. May the grace ofi 
our Lord Jesu> Christ, the love of God;, 
and communion of the Hjoly GimsU be 
with you and all the true Israeli of God, 
and finally conduct us all intothat A&sociar. 
lion of saints on high, which, is never to, 
n-e where the words, gnod bye are never, 
hear.dand where pa/ting is no, more — where. 
congregations never break up and >abbaths, 
never end; bu ; t where one eternal; day, will. 
witness the prai*e and a.lora,<ion,o£ redeem^ 
ed spirits of earth, ali ascending high to 'he 
ihrone of G.od, a,nd gf»rving m ; he. light q| 
his countenance turev.er,. Aaiejs, ay.U \* 

MEN. 



iV 



OF THE 



tehiikec llaptisl Jhsociatiosu 



HELD \T 



Spring &ie£n m. h., martin county, W. C« 

Commencing Saturday before the first Sunday in Oct, 1847. 



SATURDAY, Oct, 2nd, 1847. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was deliv- 
ered by Elder William Hyman, from Rev- 
elations, 1st. chapt. 16 verse: "And he 
had in his right hand seven stars, and out 
of his mouth went a sharp two edged 
sword, and his countenance was as the sun 
shineth in his strength." 

2. The delegates from the several chur- 
ches then assembled and the Association 
was opened with prayer by Elder John 
II. Daniel and proceeded to business; when 
Elder William Hyman was chosen Mod- 
erator, Bro. Joseph D. Biggs CIerk ; and 
Elder C. B. Hassell Assistant Clerk. 

3. Brethren in the ministry and dele- 
gates from sister Associations were invi- 
ted to seats with us; when Elders Stadler, 
Chandler, Temple, Smith, Holt and Syd- 
bury, and brethren Latta, Knight, Briley, 
and Moore seated themselves. 

4. Letters from 34 Churches were 
handed forward and read, the names of 
the delegates enrolled, and the representa- 
tion stated in the table of churches. 

5. On motion the Confession of Faith 
and Rules of Decorum were read. 

Elders John Smith and Bui 'well Temple 
were requested to preach at the stage to-day. 

6. Letters of correspondence and cor- 
responding delegates were called for, when 



Elder Burwell Temple handed forward A 
letter from the Little River Association, 
which was read accompanied with a file ot 
Minutes. 

A file of Minutes was received from the 
White Oak Association, by their delegates^ 
Elders Samuel Holt, and AsaSydbury. 

Forty Copies of the Minutes of the 
Country Line Association were handed 
forward by their delegates, Elders John 
Stadler and S. J. Chandler, and brother 
Latta. 

A file of Minutes from the Contentnea 
Association was handed forward by their 
delegates, Elder John Smith and brethren 
J. C. Knight, Benjamin Briley and John 
R. Moore. ; 

Also, files of Minutes from the Abbott's 
Creek Union and Fisher's River Assoeia= 
tions were received. 

7. On motion, petitionary letters were 
called for, but none presented. 

8. Brethren James S. Battle and Robert 
D. Hart were appointed a committee of fi- 
nance, 

9. Resolved, that we correspond by let- 
ter and delegates with White Oak and 
Contentnea Associations. Appointed El- 
der Jo&n 11, Daniel to write to White 0ak 7 
and Elders John H Daniel and D J, 
Mott delegates. 



a 



Names of churches and 

counties wherein 

situated* 



PASTORS AND DELE- 
GATES, 



bo fcs fc 

•"53 5* i 2° 



1 Beargrass, Martin county, WM.WHiTAKER,Abram Peal, 

2 Bethlehem, Tyrrell, — A. J. Swain, Wm, Reynolds,* 

3 Blount* sCfk, Beaufort, — Robert Tripp,* John Ross, 

4 Conoho, Martin, Blount CooPEE,JohnBryan, 

5 Concord, Washington, -— Samuel Lewis,* Jesse Sawyer* 

6 Conetoe, Edgecombe, !John H.Daniel, Wm. Jenkins, 

7 Cowenjock, Currituck, \ Samuel Tatum,* 

8 Cross Roads, Edgecombe, Wm. Hyman, Sov'n Purvis, 
9 Cedar Island, Carteret, — Thosi Robason, 

10 Deep Creek, Halifax, — f 

11 Falls Tar River, Nash, — A. Bi Baines, James S Battle? 

12 Plat Swamp, Pitt, — j W, W.K.Philput,l.Fage t 

13 Flatty Creek, Prisquo 1 k,—\ W. F. Banks,* 

14 FishingCreek,fla/i/aa7,-t| 

15 Gum Neck, Tyrrell, — | 

16 Great Swamp, Pitt, — Bckj. Flemming, D. House, 

17 Goose Creek, Beaufort,-] James Potter, 



18 Joyner's, Northampton, — 

19 Kehnkep. Halifax, — 

20 T awrence *, Edgecombe, - 

21 1 ittleAlli rdLlOT,Tyrrell,--\ 

22 MoratiocK, Washington,- 

23 North Creek, Beaufort,— 

24 Picot, Martin, — 

25 Powell's Point, Cur'k,— 

26 Pungo, Beaufort, — 

27 Rocky Swamp, Halifax 
28Sap|)»ny, Nashfy 

29 Scuppernong, Tyrrell, 
•30 Se. Mattamuskeet, Hyde, 

31 Sandy Grove, Wash, 

32 Skewarkey, Martin 

33 Sawyer's Cr'k, Craw/en — 



& 5=1 



Thosi Joyner, Isaac Outland, 
General Young, Jno. Stamper, 
John White, 

W. W. Mizell, Daniel Leggitt, 
N. Gaskill,* M,D. Ross, 
SB Williams J Robertson CMoore" 
Jas* Gibbins,* Si Sawyer,* 
Aquilla Davis, Edward Vail, 
L. Bi Bennett,* S. Nickels, 

D, J. Mott, Sam'l Rogers, 
G. W.Carrowan, A B Swindell 
[D. Biggs, 
CB.Hassell,Thos, Biggs,* Jos 
Wm Forbes, Sr.* A. Wilroy ~ 



34*So.Qnay, SVampton, Fa.-jJ. J. Lawrence,* A.L Gardner, 



35 Smithwick'sCr'k,Ma/*'/?- 

36 Spring Green, Martin, — 

37 Tarboro', Edgecombe, — 

38 Washington, Beaufort, — 

39 WhitePlains, Beaufort, 

40 Williams's, Edgecombe, - 



T^OTE, 



Bx Leggitt, D. Singleton, 

J. Griffin, S. Outterbridge, 

R. D, Hart, Coffield King, 

T. McKee» L, Wallace, 

J Wallace, *.H Waters* J Bo wen, 

D.Bradley, Wm. Billops, 



510 

5! 



1 1 



2 2 



26 18 20 



21 2" 



10 33 



tri 

ii 



22 
24 

30 
42 

29 
28J 
15 ! 
30'" 

23! 

Li 

56 

35; 
17 
38 
19 
86 
22 
17 
105 
39 



5L C* 



Cts 

. 00 

75 
50 

00 

po 

50 



Yearly 
meetings, 
SundaySJ 
Saturday \ 

before. 



3dinAug. 

3dinMan 
LstinSepi 

fthinSep. 
3dinSepti 
3d in Mar. 
2d in Sept. 



1 7 



/G. 
35 
22' 
41 
2ll 
GO 
43, 
17 
85 
20 
47 
12 
73 
17 
27. 
52 

m 

29J1 

28: 



1 00 
I 00 
1 00 
50 
1 50 

1 50 



2dinSept. 

lstinSep* 

2dinNov. 

ithinSepi 
75 3d inSep. 
> " 3d inSep. 

3dinSept. 



513781143 40 



4th in Aug 
4thinAug 

3rdinAug 
IthinAug 
IstinAuor 
2d inJan. 
2dinAug. 
3din Aug. 
lstinSepi 

lstinSepi 
2d inOct. 
2dinAug. 

IslinJan. 
4thinAug 
4th inSep 
1 stinAug 
IstinAug 
1 stinAug 
3dinAugi 



Pastors of churches and other ordained ministers are in small capitals; unordained 
jmmisters in italic,- those marked thus * were not present; from churches marked thus f we receiv- 
ed no intelligence, in that case their number stands as last represented; dashes —denote no pastors; 
the column before the lastj shows the contributions from the churches to the Association fund this 
year; the last column shows the yearly meetings of each church. 



Appointed Brother Robert D. Hart to 
Write to Contentnea, and Elder C. B. lias- 
sell and Brother A. B. Baines delegates. 

Appointed Elders Blount Cooper and 
D.J. Mott, and brethren John White and 
Robert D.Hart delegates to the Country 
Line Association. 

Appointed Elders John H. Daniel and 
Blount Cooper, and brethren James S. Bat- 
tle and Robert D. Hart, delegates to the 
Little River Association. 



10. Resolved, that we send 25 copies of 
our Minutes to each of the sister Associa- 
tions with which we correspond. 

11. A letter from Elder James Osbourn, 
now in England was received and read, 
and ordered to be attached to these Min- 
utes. 

12. The Minutes received from the dif- 
ferent Associations with which we corres- 
pond were distributed to the delegates. 

13. Elders John Stadler and S. J. Chan- 



dier were requested (by private ballot) to 
preach at the stage to-morrow, worship to 
commence at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

Elders Burwell Temple and John Smith 
were appointed to preach on Monday 
next. 

The Association then adjourned till 
Monday next, 9h o'clock, A. M. 

Sunday, Oct. 3d, 1847. 

Elder S. J. Chandler opened the services 
of the day and preached from Solomon's 
Song, 5 chap, and 9 verse. "What is thy 
beloved, more than another beloved, 
thou fairest among women? What is thy 
beloved more than another beloved, that 
thou dost so charge us?" 

Elder John Stadler followed and preach- 
ed from Isaiah, 60 chap, and 21 verse. 
"Thy people also shall be all righteous, 



1G. The Committee of finance was call- 
ed on to report, who did so, that 
There was in the hands of the Trea- 
surer at the close of lust Associa- 
tion the sum of $56 30 
Paid for printing the Minutes 

of last year - $25 00 

For superintending the prin- 
ting and distribution, and 
recording one copy on 
record 10 00 



Received in contributions from 
the churches at this time, 



35 00 

82 1 30 

43 40 



Making $64 70 

Now in the hands of the Treasurer, 

The Association concurred with the re- 
port and the Committee were discharged, 
17. The Committees appointed to visit 



they shall inherit the land forever, the J the Churches at Sapporiy, Sandy Grove, 



branch of my planting, the work of my 
hands that I may be glorified." 

Elder Cooper closed by singing. 

A very large congregation attended, 
very good order prevailed and we hope the 
labors will be owned and blessed of God. 

Monday Oct. 4th. 1847. 



Little Alligator, Scuppernongand Blount's 
Creek were called on to report. 

Whereupon, Brethren R. D. Hart and 
James S. Battle reported that the Com- 
mittee had waited on the Church at Sappo- 
ny and found it in some disorder; but re- 
commended further indulgence towards 
that Church, and the appointment of ano- 
The Association assembled and was \ ther committee f investigation to wait on 



opened with prayer by Elder Blount 1 ^ 



Cooper and proceeded to business. 

The names of the delegates to this As- 



The Association approved the recom- 
mendation and appointed as that commit- 



sociation were called over and those ab- ■ tee? E | ders j ohn H. Daniel and Blount 
sent, marked as such in the table of church- J Cooper, and Brethren R. D. Hart, J. S. 
es - 'Battle and A. B. Baines. 

Elder John r Daniel who was ap- ( The comm j t tee appointed to visit Little 

Alligator, reported that in consequence of 



pointed to write to the White Oak Asso- 
ciation handed forward a letter which was 
read and approved; also Brother Robert 
D. Hart handed forward a letter to the 
Contentnea Association which was read 
and approved. 

15. Resolved, that our next Associa- 
tion be held with the church at Great 
Swamp, Pitt County, to commence on 
Saturday before the first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1848, and that Elder C B. Hassell 
preach the Introductory Sermon and in 
case of his failure, Elder D. J. Mott; wor- 
ship to commence at. 11 o'clock, A. M. 



death, errors, &c. the church had reduced 
so that it was found difficult to keep up 
order and discipline, and unable to repre- 
sent themselves in the Association. Re- 
port received and agreed, that the church 
remain on our list of churches, and that all 
ministering brethren who can make it 
convenient, be requested to attend and 
preach for them as often as possible. 

The committee appointed to visit Scup- 
pernong, reported favorably, and submit- 
ted that the letter from the church be con- 
sidered as the report. Received. 



The committee appointed to visit '. the purpose of endeavoring to reconcile 
Blount's Creek reported favorably. Re -i said difficulty; said committee to consist of 
port received and committee discharged, j Elder Blount Cooper, and Brethren James 

The committee appointed to visit Sandy I Potter, Joshua Robertson, Robert D. Hart, 



drove, reported favorably. Report re- 
ceived and committee discharged. 

18. On motion, the following resolution 
was unanimously adopted: 



Joseph D. Biggs and John Bryan. 

21. Resolved, that the Clerk prepare 
these minutes for the Press, have 750 cop- 
ies printed, distributed to the church, re- 
Viewing the declining state of the ! cord one copy on the Association record, 

Primitive Baptist, which has for several ! and that he be allowed $10 for his servi- 

years been printed in Tarborough without 

any responsible Editor, we take this meth- 
od to inform all the patrons and friends of 

said paper, that it is our wish to see it a- 

gain revived and sustained, and that Elder 

Burwell Temple has consented to assume 

entire, its Editorial department on the 

commencement of the ensuing year, and 

will print it in the city of Raleigh. We 

call upon the friends and lovers of truth 

generally to aid us in sustaining Elder 

Temple in this his undertaking. 

19. On motion Resolved, that this As- 
sociation recommend the churches com- 
posing the same, to set apart the Friday 
before the third Sunday in November next, 
for fasting and prayer to Almighty God, 
supplicating him at a throne of grace for 
an outpouring of his Spirit to revive his 
work of grace in the hearts of his people 
every where throughout the borders of 
Zion, support, truth and overthrow error, 
and send forth more faithful laborers into 
his vineyard, and cause brotherly love to 
flow from breast to breast, and also cause 
many who are in darkness to see great 
light 

20. The following preamble and reso- 
lution was adopted: 

Whereas, there appears to exist a mis- 
understanding between the churches of 
Concord, Ansley's (or Scuppernong) and 
Bethlehem on the one side and So, Mat- 
tamuskeet on the other side, and the dele- 
gates from these churches being present 
and requesting it: Resolved, that a com- 



The Association then adjourned to the 
time and place appointed with an affec- 
tionate exhortation and prayer by Elder 
John Stadler. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Mod'r 
Jos. D. Biggs, Clerk. 

To the Kchukoe Baptist Association in 
North Carolina, North America, their 
friend sendeth Christian salutation from 
the city of London. 

Dear Brethren: In the spirit I hope 
to partake with you of all good things 
when ye are assembled together at Spring 
Green next month. As the Lord promis- 
ed to be as a little sanctuary to ancient 
Israel in countries where they should 
come, so I trust will he be to you when 
convene in a large body in Martin county. 
A shower of grace from the everlasting 
hills would revive your spirits, and prove 
j healthful to your inward parts; while clus 
tered among the shade trees by the high 
way side. It is to be wished that all your 
business may be conducted in wisdom and 
prudence, and in the fear of that God who 
remembered us in our low estate, and 
whose merry endurelh forever. We read 
of standing fast in one spirit, with one 
mind striving together for Ihe faith of the 
gospel. Do ye, beloved, strive together 
also for the honor of God and the good of 
souls; and I say untoj-on.^e shall in no 
mittee of six persons be appointed by this ! tuise. lose your reward. 
Association to meet, with a committee of j Be sure, all you can, to avoid dissensions 
two persons to be appointed by each of , and vain disputings about words to no pro- 
said churches, at White Plainson Saturday ! fit; but be ye perfectly joined together in 
before the fifth Sunday in this month for • the same mind, and in the same judgment ; 



and try to live in peace among yonrs« Ives, 
and the God of peace he with you to guide, 
direct, support, keep, strengthen, and 
comfort you. 

Religious affairs in this country ore quite 
mas bad a condition as they are in Ameri- 
ca. If a mildew from God is not upon 
most or alt the churches in this kingdom, 
] know not my right hand from my left; 
and great, darkness is fast gathering over 
the British churches, and out of this dark- 
ness proceed quarrels, divisions,, envies, 
malice, jealousies, hy pocrisies, and evil 
speaking. Thus are things at this time in 
mv native land, and the sight is a painful 
one; but what cannot he cured must be 
endured, I am persuaded God is carrying 
out his purposes and fulfilling his high de 
crees; and an humble submission to these 
things, on our parts is a blessing from the 



as wc all are, I wi-h the best of new cov 
enant blessings may res? upon your soul 1 *, 
and that under the same you may thrive 
and grow in the garden of God. 

I hope to he at home in about a vear 
from now, and to visit your churches in 
the spring of '49. The Lord is good to 
me in this foreign land. 1 have preached 
much in London and in other large cities 
and am attended to overflowing. \ hav© 
travelled nearly nil over England and have 
much more travelling and preaching yet to. 
do. Several of my London sermons have 
been taken down in short hand and are 
now in print and for sale in book stores. 
My Lawful Captive has been reprinted 
twice in this realm; anil the last edition, 
which which was printed last March, and 
stereotyped, wtth a large addition by my 
own hand, is almost sold off. In the space 



Lord of hosts, and it is more than what ! of nine months I have received almost 300 



some men are favored with. God deals 
out his mercies in a discriminating way. 
and that very discrimination itself, seems 
to enhance the value of the* mercies be- 
stowed. I wish we could always feel the 
force, the weight, the virtue, and the value 
of the mercies we possess from a covenant 
God; ungrateful however and unworthy 



letters. The cordial reception which I 
have met with in England is almost be- 
yond credit, and yet, hated, belied, and 
vilified by some, from pulpit and press, 
God bless you all. Amen. 

,umes osnoriRN. 

London, 50 Bedford Square, Oxford St. 
Sept. 1st. 1817. 






MINUTES 



OF THE 



bntentnea Baptist Association, 

HELD AT 

BE&R CREEK MEETINGHOUSE, 

Lenior County, JV*„ G 
The 27th, 28th, and 29th of October, 1832* 



» m t 



SATURDAY, October 27. 

1. Pursuant to adjournment of last year, the Introductory 
Sermon was delivered by Elder Thomas Dupree, from 1 John, 
iii. and 1: "Behold what manner of love the father hath be- 
stowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God." 

2. The Association then convened for business, and being 
opened with prayer by Elder Mark Bennett, proceeded to 
choose Elders Thomas Dupree, Moderator; Mark Bennett, 
Clerk; and George W. Wallace, Assistant Clerk. 

3. Brethren in the ministry, present, from sister Associa- 
tions, who were not messengers to this, were invited to sit 
with us. 

4. Letters from fifteen churches were read, their delegates' 
names enrolled, and their state exhibited in the following table, 



CHURCHES 

and 
COUNTIES. 



Autrey's Creek, 

Edgecombe. 
Bear Creek, Lenoir. 

Beaver Dam, 

Lenoir. 
Black Creek, 

Wayne. 
Friendship, 

Wayne. 
Meadow, Greene. 

•JVawhunty. Wayne. 

Oak Grove, Greene. 
Parker's, 

Edgecombe. 
'Pleasant Plains, 

Wayne. 
Sandy Bottom, 

Lenoir. 
Toisnot, 

Edgecombe. 
Town Creek, 

Edgecombe. 
Tyson's, Pitt. 

Union, Edgecombe. 

White Oak, 

Edgecombe. 



DELEGATES. 



RALEIGH REASONS,* John R. 
Moore, Robert Rasberry, 

Parrot Newborn, John Canady, 
Nathaniel Daniel, 

Aretas Jones, Lofton Neathercut, 
Lewis Williams, 

James Barnes, William Buss, Ru- 
fus Daniel, - - 

Henry Sasser, William Herring, 
Benajah Herring, 

BENJAMIN BYNUM, Richard 
Allen, John Joyner. 

Josiah Gardner, Mark Heath, Ad- 
am Heath, 

John Ringgold, Titus Carr, 

Jacob Proctor, Frederick Proctor,* 
Willie Brake,* - 

Alexander Keaton, Alfred Whit- 
field, Wright Smith, 

GEORGE W. WALLACE, Wil- 
liam Groom, Wm. H.Whitfield, 

Ephraim Daniel, Moses Farmer, 
Larry Dew, 

THOMAS DUPREE, John A. 
Atkinson* MARK BENNETT, 

SAMUEL MOORE, Sherrod 
Tice, Aaron Joyner, 

William Robbins, AiagustinWhite- 
head, Matthaw Whitehead,* 

ICHABOD MOORE, David Da- 
niel, Britton Moore, 



2 S- H 



n ' " 






12 



Total, 62 4 



5iH 



38 



f 

D.C 






2 0( 
2 0( 
2 0( 
2 01 
14 1 01 
35' 1 5 



26 
36 
72 
3! 97 
19 
78 
10 
10 ! 9698 



57 2 01 

12 1 0\ 

21! 1 0^ 

1 5i 

1 5; 



Tl 

10 1 



lat ; 
p 
2 ^\hk 

2 o< i0tlie 

II 1)11 

1 5( !er 
pi 
reki 
o/vei 
Ends 
Gei 



2 o< 
1 



26 3 



NOTE. Pastors of Churches, and other ordained Ministers, are in small CA 
PITALS; unordained Ministers in italics. Those marked thus,* were not present* 
The last column shews the contributions from the Churches to the Associatioi 
fund. 



Me 
13, 

ister 
11 

k w 



5. Petitionary letters were called for, whereupon one, fron 
White Oak Church, Edgecombe, was handed in and read, an 
said church was received a member to this Association, by ihi 
Moderator's giving the right hand of fellowship. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister Associations wen 
called for;— one wa* handed in from the Kehukee; and verbal 



1: ;■ 



information received from the Little River, by Elder Williaa 
Wall: the intelligence from both of which was soul-cheeringf^ 
More than two hundred have been added to the latter by bap 
tism, since their last session. 

7 Resolved., that in future, our Association continue thre< 
days in succession, beginning on Saturday. 



15, 
ktfei 






B 

8. Appointed brethren, Sherrod Tice and Rufus Daniel, a 
ommittee of finance; — to report to the Association on Mon- 
lay; and that the report be spread on our Minutes. 

9. The Circular Letter was called for, read, and received, 

10. Resolved, that our next Association be held at Tyson's 
A. H. in Pitt county, — to commence Saturday before the fourth 
Sunday in October, 183:3, at 11 o'clock, A. M. Elder George 
V. Wallace is requested to deliver an introductory sermon; 
Hie shall fail Elder Mark Bennett, to do the same. 

11 Elders Dupree, Wall, and Bennett, wvw appointed 
y private ballot^ to preach on the Sabbath, — worship to begin 
t 10 o'clock, A. M. 

12 Adjourned till Monday morning, 9 o'clock: prayer hy 
Bder Bynum. 

SUNDAY, October 28th. 
The services of the day were introduced by Elder Dupree, 
yho preached from 1 Cor. xv. chap. 22 verse: "Far as in Ad- 
m all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive. But ev- 
5 ry man in his own order: Christ the first fruits; afterward th?*y 
bat are Christ's at his earning." He was followed by Elder 
Bennett, from Matt. xiii. chap. 30 verse: "Let both grow to- 
ol ether until the harvest: and in the time of harvest I will say 
0( o the reapers, gather ye together first the tares, and bind them 
n bundles to burn them: but gather the wheat into mv barn." 
5(! l!der Swinson, to whom Elder Wall chose to give place, con- 
cluded by preaching from 2 Cor. v. chap. 1 and 2 verse: "For 
/e know that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dis- 
solved, we have a building of God, a house not made with 
3 lands, eternal in the heaven. For in this we groan." 
j General interest appeared to be taken in the word preached; 
nd we hope the labor was not in vain. 

MONDAY, October 29th. 
Met pursuant to adjournment:— prayer by the Moderator. 
13. Agreed that, the Ministers sent as messengers to visit 
ister Associations be compensated for their services. 

14 Agreed that, Elders Thomas Dupree and Benjamin. 
Jynum be appointed to visit the Kehukee Association; ind 
r( hat we send by them to that Association 40 copies of our M'i ri- 
fles: and Elders Bynum, Dupree, and Wallace, to visit the Lit- 
tle River; and that we send by them to that Association 20 
opies. 

15. Elder Ichabod Moore is requested to write a Circular 
jctter, in behalf of this Association, to be attached to our next 
gMinutes. 



4 

The committee of finance report thaythey find in the Treasury, $36 5i ffsati< 
deceived by contributions this year, - - - - 26 3«| 



Making $62 9< eric 

liet, 



Paid for printing these Minutes, - - $10 00 

Paid Elder Dupree for attending the Kehukee Association, 5 00 
Paid Elder George W. Wallace for attending the Lit- 
tle River Association, - - * 7 00 
AHowed the Clerk for services, <■ * • 10 00 

Making, 32 of cr 
" — )oi 



rape 
etous 

'Cli 



Balance remaining in the treasury, $30 £ 
SHERROD TICE, > r „. 
RUFUS DANIEL, $ * 

17. Eider Mark Bennett is requested to transcribe and pre 
pare these Minutes for the press; to have 400 copies strucklb 
and distributed as usual; and to record one copy on the Asselpo 
ciation book. 

18. Called over the list cf delegates. 

19. Resolved that, the Confession of Faith, recorded in thjM 
History of the Kehukee Baptist Association, be annexed tmj 
these Minutes, that the churches and brethren composing thi 
Association may have an opportunity of examining, and of con 
sidering the scriptural ground of that Confession; and that, the 
express, in their several letters to our next Association, thei 
approbation, or disapprobation, to said Confession. 

20. The Minutes were then read and assigned by the Mode 
rator, and Clerk. 

21. Adjourned to the time and place above named. 
(Signed.) THOMAS DUPREE, Moderator 

MARK BENNETT, Clerk. 



nemb 

in f i 
ml 



eaioi 

IV. 



whet 
then 
jies 



gen, 
(ft 
lie 

war 



The Contentnea Baptist Association, assembled at Bee 
Creek Meeting House, Saturday and Sunday, the 27ih an 
28th days of October, 1832, to all the brethren of our Associe 
tion, send Christian love and exhortation. 

Brethren, love one another; without dissimulation; in dee 
and in truth; with a pure heart fervently. Be kind; be court* 
ous, condescending and humane. Love your enemies. Et 
treat them not as enemies. Do them no harm. Show them i 
your body the marks of the Lord Jesus. If they do you an ir 
jury, do them a favor. Hate no man. Despise no man. B 
kind to all. Remember thefpoor,— -of the ministry, of yoi 
brethren, of your neighbors. Put on bowels of mercies. B 
piteous. Visit the fatherless and the widows in their affliction! 
Visit tfae sick, Let tljem see your ftices; let them hear your cor 



;|# 



9 

'^ersation; it will comfort them, it will make their pains lighter. 

'J 1 Be not partial; do not make little of the poor; do not envy 
%ie rich. Seek contentment; show moderation. Try to be 
juiet, and peaceable. Let humility be your clothing; and let 
gentleness keep you company continually. Be sober. Be 
emperate; do not drink too much spirits. Guard against co- 
'etousness; it is a legion of sins. Do not defraud one another, 

oiior cheat one another. Do not tell lies; big lies, nor little ones. 

jjjOo not swear — vulgar swearing, nor modest swearing. Re- 
nember the tongue a hundred times a day. Avoid idleness; 
sin waits by its side. Flee slothfulness, it is the harbinger of 
ml. Brethren, watch. Your path is full of the world; your 
iesh, on all sides; Satan every where. Do not bite, norback- 

sojaite one another. Don't speak evil of each other. Beware of 
ealousy, and evil-surmising. Entertain strangers; use hospi- 
ality. Enquire for the old way; and walk in it. Look cau- 
iously at new doctrines, and new forms. Read the scriptures; 

tijand keep near them in faith and praciiee. Brethren, pray; and 

hijoften ask God in secret for what you want. While there, think 
whether your brother has any tiling against you; and whether 
there is any you cannot forgive. Do not forget that your bo- 
dies are the temple of the Holy Ghost. Recollect, if any man 
defile this temple, him shall God destroy. Flee fornication^ 

lekeep clear of reproach from that quarter. It is the most dan- 
gerous rock in your voyage. To your wives yield up the best 
affection of your hearts. Be fathers to your children: reasona- 
ble to your servants. Finally, brethren, do not fall out by the 
way: your journey is not of very great length. The Lord give 
us all more grace. To Him be glory forever, Amen. 

*<2fg&*- 

Confession of JFaitf)* 

1. We believe in the being of God, as almighty, eternal, un- 
changeable, of infinite wisdom, power, justice, holiness, good- 
ness, mercy and truth: And that this God has revealed him- 
self in his word, under the characters of Father, Son and Ho- 
ly Ghost. 

2. We believe, that Almighty God has made known his 
mind and will to the children of men in his word; which word 
we believe to be of divine authority, and contains all things ne- 
cessary to be known for the salvation of men and women. The 
same is comprehended or contained in the books of the Old 
and New Testament, as are commonly received. 

3. We believe, that God, before the foundation of the world* 



|es f i! 
en co 
I, 
an 
15. 
lid ili 
16, 
raiiun 
oiflfi i 
17. 
n an* 
1 ii 
uhere 



vera 
ers i 
indin 

Mid a 



6 

for a purpose of his own glory, did elect a certain number o 
men and angels to eternal life; and that this election is particu 
la J', eternal and unconditional on the creature's part. 

4. We believe, that when God made man at first, he was per 
feet, holy, and upright, able to keep the law, but liable to falp 11 
and that he stood as a federal head, or representative of all hi 
natural offspring, and that they were to be partakers of the ben 
efiTs of his obedience, or exposed to the misery which sprang 
from his disobedience. 

5. We believe, that Adam fell from this state of moral recti 
tude, and that he involved himself and all his natural offspring 
in a state of death; and for that original transgression, we al" 
are both filthy and guilty in the sight of an holy God. 

6. We also believe, that it is utterly out of the power o 
men, as fallen creatures, to keep the law of God perfectly, re] ! ^ ei 
pent of their sins truly, or believe in Christ, except they be' 
drawn by the Holy Spirit. 

7. We believe, that in God's own appointed time and way 1 
(by means which he has ordained) the elect shall be called 
justified, pardoned and sanctified; and that it is impossible thev 
can utterly refuse the call; but shall be made willing, by divine 
grace, to receive the offers of mercy. 

8. We believe, that justification in the sight of God is only 
hy the imputed righteousness of Jesus Christ, received and ap- 
plied by faith alone. 

9. We believe in like manner, that God's elect shall not on- 
ly be called, and justified, but that they shall be converted, born 
again, and changed in the effectual working of God's holy spirit 

10. We believe, that such as are converted, justified and 
called by his grace, shall persevere in holiness and never fall 
finally away. 

11. We believe it to be a duty incumbent on all God's peo- 
ple, to walk religiously in good works; not in the old covenant 
way of seeking life and the favor of the Lord by it; but only as 
a duty from a principle of love. 

12. We believe baptism and the Lord's Supper are gospel 
ordinances, both belonging to the converted or true believers; 
and that persons who were sprinkled, or dipped, whilst in un- 
belief, were not regularly baptized according to God's word, 
and that' such ought to be baptized after they are savingly con- 
verted into the faith of Christ. 

13. We believe that every church is independent in matters 
of discipline; and that associations, councils and conferences 
of several ministers or churches, are not to impose on the chur- ! 



):: 



lies the keeping, holding or maintaining any principle or prao 
ice contrary 10 the church's judgment. 

14 We believe in the resurrection of the dead, both of the 
jsi and the unjust, and a general judgment. 

15. We believe the punishment of the wicked is everlasting, 
nd the joys of the righteous are eternal. 

16. VVe believe that no mjnister has a right to the adminis- 
ation of the ordinances, only such as are regularly called and 
ome under imposition of hands by the Presbytery. 

17. Lastly, we do believe, that for the mutual comfort, uni- 
n and satisfaction of the several churches of the aforesaid 
iith and order, that we ought to meet in an Association way; 

herein each church ought to represent their case by their de- 
feates, and attend as often as is necessary to advise with the 
everal churches in conference; and that the decision of mat- 
ers in' such associations, not to be imposed, or in any wise 
inding on the churches without their consent, but only to sit 
nd act as an advisary council. 



Free Press -~ Tar boro' N. V, 



Jr 



DBFBNCB 

OF THE 

iBtB<BU;b&B IBiMraQOV (SQNIIRDOI 

OF 

AGAINST 
UTTERED AND PUBLISHED 

By the Editor of the N. G. Baptist Interpreter, 

AND OTHERS. 



To our Brethren, and all others whom it may. concern: Beloved 
brethren, we are sorry to be constrained injustice to ourselves, and to the 
sacred cause of truth, thus to come forth before the public; but there ap- 
pears to us no other practical and adequate means of self defence, against 
the unjust defamatory reports with which we have been publicly im- 
peached, by the Editor of the N. C. Baptist Interpreter. In the meantime, 
let it be fairly understood, that we make the following statement of facts 
merely in defence of our injured rights and not in hostility to Elder Mere- 
dith or any other* In his June No. p. 137, he informs the public, that he 
had relinquished his pastoral connexion with the church in this place, for 
the following reason: "This we did on account of a conviction on our part, 
that our services would be more usefully employed among the neighboring 
churches, and in attending those meetings of greater utility, so frequently 
claiming our attention. '' But after traducing the church, in the manner 
he has done, in his July No« p. 161, he proceeds in his Nov. No. p. 159 to 
inform the public, "That owing to circumstances which could not be fully 
and correctly stated, without calling in question the conduct of individuals, 
this church was left in May last without a pastor." Thus he not only con- 
tradicts himself, but by implicating nameless individuals in nameless crimi- 
nality, he shrouds the character of every individual member, with a liabili- 
ty of being suspected of some gross enormity, without the possibility of 
self defence. Such, it appears, was the love and faithfulness of our late 
pastor to his brethren, to leave some of them in the habits of unspecified 
criminality, without endeavoring to reclaim them; and afterwards, on their 




account, to envelope the whole church with the black mantle o? suspicion f' 3 ' 
However, with respect to the above allegation, we can truly say, there ex j Iw' 
jsted at that time no just exception to the conduct of individuals, more thaij ^ 
at any former period, since brother Meredith became our pastor; excep sip 1 ' 
that some refused to increase their contributions to make up a certain sum ig B1! 
without which he had refused to preach to us any longer. But be this a:i ^ 
h may, it is left with the public, which of the above reasons to believe, foil Hered 
brother Meredith's resignation — whether the love of money, or of greateil rom s 
usefulness. As for the errors and innovations imputed to this church, anci w™ 
to the dentist, Whom lie himself had concurred to invite into our pulpit; se<j parties 
July No pp, 161-2: "That all articles of faith, church covenants, churcl In I 
constitutions, rules of decorum, systems of discipline, he. are unnecessary! now 
unscriptural, and hurtful: — that a few officious individuals may violate tmhHgf 
standing and fundamental regulations of a church, without asking quesi },an 
tions, and without incurring censure: — that the practice of receiving me mj lays, 
bers into the church on the ground of a religious experience, is unauthorisj dim. 
ed, and ought to be abolished: — that, in order to the admission of membersl lei, a 
no act of the church is necessary or proper:-— and that any perron is proiiuli 
perly qualified for baptism, who will say that he believes in Christ, loveitpcei 
God, and is desirous for the ordinance: — and that, by a special act of th<ibn 
church, they have given their sanction to preaching, in which, we undeMffldil 
stand, the doctrine of election, regeneration by the Holy Ghost, and justifies, ' 
cation by faith, were discarded." Now respecting all and every of thesdepre 
charges, we do solemnly declare that neither this church, nor a majority o<|uite 
it, nor even an individual member, known to us, held or advocated thdiip 
above sentiments, nor any of them, with the exception of the specified qua 19th t 
lification for baptism, which some of us think to be a true scriptural experiitage,i 
ence of the grace of God, justly entitling the possessor to the enjoyment Qiatidsi 
that ordinance; and, for his possessing of which, we can, in the meantimeusub; 
have nothing but his word. Nor did this church by "any special act" eiitk 
ther before or since the pnblication of the above libel, give its sanction t(!l<w 
preaching, in which the above named doctrines were discarded; nor indeecjpssi 
could we, in truth, so do; for neither the dentist, nor any one else, since hftfuit 
departure, "discarded" these doctrines in our pulpit. Wherefore, in reliaod 
butting this libellous impeachment, we could not change ground, as is as Eden 
serted in the Nov. No. p. 259, and that for the strongest possible reason iiignei 
namely, because we had taken no new ground. Nor is it true, as stated p inga 
260, that any portion of our members had embraced, or have as yet em ibe sp> 
braced, any other reformation principles, than those expressly contained in berla: 
our solemn covenant engagements. And just as unfounded is the assertion log, b: 
"that such an excitement existed, as had manifestly become too high to ad in cot 
mil of any attempt to enforce discipline, and restore order and tranquility ,' lade; 
The truth is, that the church had held but one meeting during broiheindmiti 
Meredith's late absence; at which meeting there was no unpleasant excite ilei^ 
ment, unless the unhappy feelings occasioned, by the scandalous libel un Haiti 
der consideration, in relation to which, the whole church with the exceptioi *as bi 
of three or four resolved as follows: "1st. That, in justice to ourselves, uncliurc 
are compelled to view the said publication as a malicious libel against ou (stand 
body, and unworthy to be placed in the columns of a publication bearing |inj S | 
its title; and what makes this treatment the more grievous to us is, in view- fo^ 
ing the relation that has subsisted between this church and Elder Meredith I lad « 



3 

>ie having been our pastor for the last eight years, and still a member of our 
church, we had every reason to expect better treatment from him, And, as 
to what may have been said or advanced by any preachers, in or out of our 
oulpit, which is not according to the gospel of Jesus Christ, we do not re- 
cognize it as our doctrine, and are not answerable for it. 2d. That this 
church is willing to hear any acknowledgments and explanations, that Elder 
Meredith may feel disposed to make; or he is at liberty to call in helps 
rom sister churches, he appointing two, and this church three, to form a 
committee to investigate and settle the difficulty existing between the said 
parties. Done at our regular monthly conference, Nov. 9, 1833." 

In the meantime, the said dentist, Dr. B. F. Hall, having returned in 
consequence of the unanimous invitation of the church, and with him the 
aid gentleman mentioned p. 259 — found the church in profound tranqt|ili- 
y, anxiously expecting his return. He continued with us only two Sun- 
days, and left Edenton but two or three days before brother Meredith came 
lome. The next day he, said Meredith, went out to meet the church at Be- 
r hel, and the followingTuesday afternoon called a meeting of our church, 
it which, instead of availing himself of our pacific resolve in his favor, he 
oroceeded to add insult to injury, by reproaching the church of having 

tli become Campbellites, rending himself from it, and calling for a division; 
ind thus effected the ruinous event, which he describes on the page before 
js. Hence it must appear evident to every intelligent person, that the above 

es representation of the state of the church which he gives, as having become 
ljuite unmanageable through excitement, was morally impossible, there be- 

tli ng neither time nor cause for such a thing to take place from the 9th to the 

08 19th of the same month. The truth is, he took the church at an advan- 
age, the members not knowing for what purpose the meeting was called; 
knd so scared the majority with the alarming imputation of Campbellism, 
i subject of which they were, for the most part, entirely ignorant, that he 
hus effected to divide the church, and so escape its discipline. Here fol- 
lows our minute of this unhappy affair, "which" (to return his compliment 
grossly misapplied to us) ; 'was as degrading to the cause of Christ, as it 
^as mortifying to the feelings of all the friends of good order, and Chris- 
ran decorum." — "In compliance with a resolution of the Baptist church of 
Edenton, at her regular conference meeting Dec'r 7th, 1833, the under- 
igned, your committee, beg to submit the following statement, as contain- 
ng a correct narrative of the late proceedings at a meeting occasioned by 
he special request of Elder Thomas Meredith, on the 19th day of Novem- 
ber last. The brethren being met, without knowing the object of the meet^ 
ng, brother Meredith engaged in prayer, and then proceeded to state, that 
n consequence of certain proceedings of the church, during his absence, he 
lad called the members of the church together, to inform them, that having 

y admitted certain ministers of the gospel, whom he called reformers, into 
heir pulpit, contrary to his views, and also of some of the members; and 
hat this church had departed from the principles of the regular Baptists, and 

io .vas become a Campbellite church; — that he therefore rent himself from this 
church, and would join some other;-^that if none wowld receive him, he would 
tand alone;— then made a proposition for all who were unwilling to hear said 
ministers preach to declare the same by rising; — when some of the breth- 
*en, (who considered the proposition unauthorised, as coming from one who 
tad "rent himself from the church," consequently not a member,) arose 



4 

to express their opinion, they were refused a hearing, and brother Mere- 
dith requested all in favor of his proceedings to remove to one side of the 
house, as he had resolutions to propose for their adoption; when one of the 
brethren arose again to make some remarks, disapproving of the proceed- 
ings, he was refused a hearing. Brother iVJeredith then proposed remov- 
ing to his own house, and was answered he had better do so, as being a more 
suitable place, which he accordingly did, saying, they have the house, let 
them keep it; and so retired with a part of the persons who favored his pro- 
posals; thus the meeting terminated " We understand that brother Mere- 
dith and his adherents, have since appointed two deacons and been consti- 
tuted into a new and separate church in a private house in the night, 
and have got themselves recognized as the regular Baptist church ol 
Edenton, by the late Yeopim Union Meeting, held at Piney Grove 
meeting house, which met on Fnday, 27th ulto. Which meeting al- 
so — "Resolved, that the former Baptist church of Edenton, in conse- 
quence of her manifest departure from the faith and practice of regular 
Baptists, be, and she is hereby declared to be, separated from the com- 
munion, and of course from all the privileges, responsibilities, and rela- 
tions of this Union meeting." And all this, without our knowledge — with- 
out visitation or inquiry on the part of our brethren, who have thus most 
unfeelingly robbed us of our Christian character; if so be, that the faith and 
order of the regular Baptists constitute such a character. And this tliej? 
have done, not only without the formality of a trial, but even without exa- 
mination, specification or proof. Was ever such an act known in the histo- 
ry of the Baptist churches! That a set of disorganizes, rending themselves 
from a church, without so much as the request of a regular dismissal, should 
find ministers of the gospel so bent upon doing wrong as to constitute such 
disorderly members into a new and separate church, in the name and room 
of that from which they had thus violently departed, and thus by a special 
act of nullification destroy the relative existence of the former. Tell it not 
in Gath, publish it not in the streets of Askelon, lest the daughters of the 
Philistines rejoice, lest the uncircumcised triumph. There is not a Pedo- 
baptist sect in the land, that would treat their brethren in such a summary ^ 
high-handed, unceremonious manner: even the Spanish Inquisition itself 
afforded its victims the shadow of a trial. If this be the good faith and or- 
der of the regular Baptists, in their dealings with their brethren, the less we 
have of either, the better. But, in the meantime, we shall still hope better 
things at the hand of some of our brethren; and to their justice and sympa- 
thy we appeal. With Christian respects to all the friends and lovers of 
truth, peace, and righteousness, we remain your much injured and suffering 
brethren. In behalf of the Baptist church of Edenton. 

•Joseph Jflanning* 
Thos. Waff. 

February, 1834, M. t/#. Skinner. 



Far bora* Free Press. 



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FITT COUNTY, JV. C. 

26th, 27th, and 28th of October, 1833. 



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SATURDAY, October 26th, 1833. 

Pursuant to adjournment of last year, the Introductory Ser- 
mon was delivered by Elder George W. Wallace, from John 
v. 25: "Verily, verily, I say unto you, The hour is coming, and 
now is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God: 
ii| and they that hear shall live." 

The Association then convened for business, and being open- 
ed with prayer by Elder Samuel Moore, chose Elders, Thom- 
as Dupree, Moderator; Mark Bennett, Clerk; and George W, 
Wallace, Assistant Clerk. 

Brethren in the ministry, present, from sister Associations, 
were invited to sit with us; whereupon, Elders, Joshua Law- 
rence and Lemuel Ross, from the Kehukee, Elder Henry 
Swinson, from the Goshen, and Elder Jesse Adams and Bro- 
ther George W. Whitfield, from the Little River, took seats 
with us. 

Appointed Brethren John A. Atkinson and Sherrod Tison, 
a committee of finance; and agreed that they report on Mon- 
day next. 






Letters from seventeen churches were read, their delegates 
names enrolled, and their numerical siate made known, as ex 
hibited in the following table: — 



M 
[III 

k\ 

I iver 

ben 



WAMES OF CHURCHES 

and Counties ivhert 
situated 



Autrey's Creek, Edgecombe 

&zar Creek, Lenoir. 
Beaver Dam, Lenoir. 

Black Creek, Wayne. 

Friendship, Wayne. 

Meadow, Greene. 

Memorial, Wayne. 
Nautmnty, Wayne. 

Oak Grave, Greene. 
Pleasant Hilt, Edgecombe. 

Pleasant Plains, Wayne. 

Sandy Bottom, Lenoir. 

Toisnoi. Ed»ecombe. 

Town Creek, Edgecombe. 

Tyson's, Pitt. 

Union, Edgecombe. 

White Oak, Edgecombe. 



MINISTERS &• DELEGATES. , ? 



RALEIGn REASOXS, John R. 
M<<ore, Stephen Woolen. 

John Women, Allen Whitfield, 

*\retas Jones, *Lewis Williams, 
Lof'on Nenthercul, 

Jam*'- Barnes, William Bass, Ru% 
fus Daniel, 

* George Herring, *Benajah Her- 
ring, » 

BENJAMIN BYNUM, Richard Al- 
len- John Jovner, - 

Tobias Jones, *Wright Bass, 

Josiah Gardner, Mark Heath, John 
Smith, • - 

Benjamin Briley, H'~nry ;Nichois, 

"Jacob Proctor, Frederic Proctor, 
Willie Brnke, 

Alfred Ellis Wright Smih, *Den- 
nis Glibsen, 

GEORGE W. WALLACE, Wm, 
Croom, Wm. H. Whitfield, 

Ephraim Daniel, Moses Farmer, I 
"Larry D. w, 

THOMAS DUPREE, J. A. AT \ 
KIN SON. A \Rh BENNETT, ; 

SAMUEL MOORE, John Jones, 
Sherrod Tison, 

Matthew Whitehead, Augustin 

Whitehead, Jonathan Bailey, 
ICHABOD MOORE. James Wood- 
ward, Solomon Barnes, 

Total, 



b \H b 

69 1 « 3 



51 1 



49 

58 

38 

64 

17 

28 
8 

59 

12 

» 

I 
S5 

35 ! 

68 
97 
19 
67 
15 
15! 8 F 68t»' 



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NOTE. Pastors of Churches, and other ordained Ministers, are in small CAPITALS; un 
ordained Ministers in italics; those marked thus, * *ere not present; the last column showij [Qi{jn 
the contributions from the Churches to the Association fund 



p 

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Tl 

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Petitionary letters were called for, if any, when one from the 
church at Memorial, was handed in by Brother Tobias Jones 
and read; and upon enquiry, she was considered sound in the 
faith, and was received by the Moderator's giving her delegate 
the right hand of fellowship. 

Letters of correspondence from sister Associations were! 
called for: — One from the Kehukee was handed in by Elder lTe 
Joshua L jwrence, and read; and verbal information was recei- ^ 
ved from the Little River, by Elder Jesse Adams. 

Resolved: that we revoke the resolution passed at the ses^ 
sion of 1831, respecting our mode of corresponding with sister 
Associations; and that we resume the made of corresponding 
by letter and messengers; as formerly. 



issn 
ft 
:ei 

fey 



2 

ai| The Circular Letter was called for, and 

On motion, agreed that Elders Dupree, Lawrence and Ben? 

ett, be appointed a committee to examine it; and thai they re- 

ort to the Association on Monday next. 

Appointed Eider George W. Wallace to write to the Little 
Liver Association, and Elders, Wallace, Bynum, and I. Moore, 
) bear the letter; and agreed that we send by them 20 copies 

four Minutes: also appointed Elder Bynum to write to I he 
Cehukee, and Elders Dgpree and Atkinson to bear the letter; 
nd agreed thai they carry with them 40 copies of our Minutes. 

Resolved, that our next Association be held at Union meet- 
ig house, Edgecombe county, commencing Saturday before 
he fourth Lord's day in October, 1834; and ;hat the Iutroduc- 
ory Sermon be delivered by Elder John A. Atkinson, and in 
ase he fail, by Elder I. Moore, beginning at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

Elected Eiders Lawrence and Ross to preach on the Lord's 
lay; and agreed that worship commence at half past 10 o'- 
lock, A. M. 

1 Adjourned till 9 o'clock on Monday, with prayer by the Mo- 
ierator. 

LORD'S D 4 Y, October 27th. 

EldfM* Lemuel Ross, introduced the service, and preached 
rom Prov. xiv. 12, and from John, kiv. 6: "There is a wiv 
vhich seemeth right unto a man; but the end thereof are Hie 
vays of death, t am the wty, and the truth, and the life."— ~ 
Slder Lawrence preached from Acts, xvi. 17: uf Efce.se are the 
ervams of the most high God, wnich show unto us the way of 
alvation." From the good order that prevailed, and the e'iA 
ie>t attention paid, we hope that the children of God were *e- 
reshed, and sinners edified; and that the divine blessing ac- 
sompanied, and will, in its effects, follow many precious souls 
trough a happy eternity. 

MONDAY, October 28th. 

Met pursuant to adjournment: prayer by the Moderator. 

On motion, the Rules of Decorum were read. 

The Brethren appointed to write the corresponding letters, 
fere requested to present them. Elder Wallace reported that 
je had failed to write. On motion, agreed that Elder Wallace- 
trite, and that the letter be left to the inspection ot Elders By- 
lum and I. Moore, together with himself. 

Elder Bynum, who was appointed to write to the Kehukee 
Association, presented the letter; which was read and approved. 

The committee appointed to examine the Circular Letter 
isked leave to report, that, They ha<l examined ir, and that 
they felt some objections to its reception: that the writer, with 



4 
permission from the Association, would withdraw it; and they 
recommended that he have liberty to withdraw it, which was 
granted. Also, they asked leave to recommend, that the Asso- 
ciation appoint a committee to prepare a Circular to be ap- 
pended to these Minutes. The report was agreed to. 

Appointed Brethren Dupree, Atkinson, Joyner and Bennett,! ieui 
a committee to prepare the Circular for the present Minutes. 

Appointed Elder Bennett to prepare a Circular for our next 
year's Minutes. 

The committee of finance report that they find now in the Treasury, $30 90 
Received by contributions this year, - - - 25 65 



$56 55 
Paid Elder Dupree for attending the Kehukee Association, $4 00 
Paid Elder Reasons, by order of the Association, the account | D ,j 

due Elders Bynum and Wallace for attending the Little 
River Association, - - - - 10 00 

Paid Clerk for services, - - - - 10 00 

Ll .? 4 m 

Balance remaining in the Treasury, $32 5.1 
28th Oct. 1833. SHERROD TISON, > r v - 

JOHN A. ATKINSON, $^ om -* ,n - 

Agreed, that Elder Bennett be requested to transcribe and 
prepare these Minutes for the press; to have 400 copies struck 
and distributed as usual; and to record one copy on the Asso- 
ciation book: and that he continue to act as our Treasurer. 

Called over the list of delegates, and noted the absentees. 

The Minutes were read and assigned by the Moderator and 
Clerk. 

Adjourned with prayer by the Moderator. 

THOMAS DUPREE, Moderator. 

MARK BENNETT, Clerk. 



The Contentnea Association, assembled at Tyson's Meeting 
House, Pitt county, Octobtr 2$th t 1833, to all the Churchei 
composing her body. 
Beloved Brethren in Christ:—* 

The long forbearance and grace of God have permitted uf 
to assemble once more in Association, where the sight of oui 
brethren from almost every church in our bounds has gladden 
ed our hearts, and where the pleasing and brotherly manner o 
our sitting together we trust has tended to strengthen the cord* 
of our love and of our union. With an earnest and longing 



5 

desire for your prosperity, we feel unwilling to part and return 
ito ou» homes -without sending some token of our remembrance, 
] and some word of admonition and encouragement to assist you 
i while passing along on your pilgrimage. There is, we believe, 
i dea Brethren, but one state in which the miseries of the pre- 
1,80111 lift* can bo softened, and the dismal gloom of the future 
l can be removed; namely, that in winch "the love of God is shed 
■abro td in our hearts," causing our affections to warm to heaven, 
land our hearts to embrace our brethren. Love is the essence 
(and quintessence of all true religion; and never are the saints 
lof (tcm| so hippy as when they feel its warmest exercise. Be- 
jjReving, brethren, that "the love of many," nay, the love uf all 
is waxing cold, and that our happiness is thereby diminish- d 
and diminishing; to the intent that we may seek to regain our 
"first love," vve will call your attention to this as the subject of 
our present Circular. Is not our situation similar to that of the 
chur h at Ephesus, described by John the divine, Rev. ii. 1 — 5, 
and in >y not the Holy Ghost have the same charge against us? 
eU-iho the angel of the church of Ephesus write; These things 
saith he that holdeth the seven stars in his right hand, who 
walketh in the midst of the sevien golden candlesticks; I know 
thy works, and thy labor, and thy patience, and how thou canst 
not bear them which are evil: and thou hast tried them which 
say they are Apostles, and are not, and hast found them bars; 
and hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name's sake, hast 
labored, and hast not fainted. Nevertheless, 1 have somewhat 
against thee, because thou hast left thy first love. Remember, 
therefore, from whence thou art fallen; and repent, and do the 
first works; or else 1 will come unto thee quickly, and will re- 
move thy candlestick out of his place, except thou repent." 

Soon after the churches in Asia were planted certain teach- 
ers came amongst them, saying, We are apostles. The church 
of Ephesus, unwilling to be led away from the truth, felt it to 
be their duty to try them. The result of the trial was, they 
"found them liars." The testimony, together with the com- 
mendations bestowed upon this church by the Holy Ghost, 
shows them to have been true and steadfast in almost every 
thing but one: They had left their first love. As soon as they 
had got through with the trial of the false apostles, they were 
Commanded to "repent and do the first works:" and they were 
threatened that, in case they failed, their candlestick should be 
removed out of his place; that is, their church should be scat- 
tered and brought to nought. No doubt they did right to try 
the false apostles. But whatever effect this business with its 
attendant circumstances ought to have had upon that church, 



it is certain that it had the tendency to cool their affections, 
and to remove them from their first love. Now to the similar- 
ity of our own condition. 

For about twenty years, teachers have been amongst us, the 
truth of whose doctrines, and the correctness of whose practi- 
ces, we from the beginning, had reason lo doubt. We fell it 
our duty to try them. The trial has been long and distressing, 
and we do believe the result has been, we have found their doc- 
trines and practices unscriptural. And we may say again, 
whatever ought to have been the effects produced by this inves- 
tigation, it surely appears to have cooled and drawn us away 
from our first love. How lukewarm has it left our love to 
God, and how cramped and indifferent our good affections to 
on^ another! But to advance: St is certainly a duty that Chris- 
tians should love God, and each o*her sincerely and ardently; 
or this charge, "«hou nasi left thy first love," and the attendant, 
command, "Repent and do ihe first works," would not have 
been offered to tfie church of Ephesus. Do we not hear the 
same charge against us, and the same command directed to us? 
The trying of false doctrines has changed, in some degree, the 
business of the Preacher, from feeding to fighting; from nurs- | m , 
ing the flock to opposing the encroachments of the wolf; and 
feelings of resistance were obliged to be cherished. Findings 
error and deception among us, our general confidence has 
been weakened; and with the firmly united, the joy of confi- 
dence has been marred. Suspicions and jealousies have been jiS y 
created; shyness and distance have been discovered; and that ^ 
charity which suffers long, bears all things, and hopes what it 
cannot believe, or believes all things, has lost something of its 
freeness and openness. Contentions have been followed by in- 
jured feelings, almost affecting our brotherly habits. We 
hope, brethren, that you have been able to discern the errors 
which have prevailed, so that you are now settled in your 
minds; having measurably got through with the examination of 
these false doctrines. And if now we have left our first love, 
we pray that we may remember from whence we have fallen: 
not from all love, but from first love, or first degree of love. 
Prior to this trial, our hearts contained room enough for all our 
brethren in the United States, now, two or three small Associ- 
ations, or a few churches, — and often-times not all the mem- 
bers in a single church, can find unfeigned love in our bosoms. 
A sourness, we fear, is contracted, which is too prone to debate 
and contention. Even when brethren of kindred sentiments 
meet while mutual love of the truth constituies a source of con- 
siderable happiness and esteem, they, notwithstanding, fre- 



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quently feel their brotherly affection obstructed by something, 
they scarcely know what. Love struggles for freer exercise, 
but fails, and mourns under disappointment. In this condi- 
tion, the Christian's largest share of spiritual comfort is not 
our lot. Our first love could turn misfortunes into blessings, 
while it could contemplate all things working together for good. 
Like Jacob, it could shorten time with us; and like Abraham, 
it eould rn^ke us willing to sacrifice our dearest delights. It 
could hide a great many sins, nearly all the faults of our bre- 
thren. It could cause us cheerfully to forsake our homes and 
our husbandry, and hasten to the sanctuary; — there, sitting un- 
der the Lord's shadow was delightful, and his fruit was sweet 
to our taste. The songs of Zion were our employment, and our 
conversation was paved with love. But where are we now! 
Fallen, and aur first love is gone. Mere trifles overmatch our 
present love, and grosser passions are contending for the mas- 
tery. Each day the Holy Ghost is secretly saying "1 have 
somewhat against thee, because thou hast left thy first love." 
And instead of vvraihfully crying, Wo! He is graciously whis- 
pering, Remember! Let us remember his threats; they will be 
mecuted. It is not enough that we contend for the faith, but 
that we live the life of charity also. In proportion to our love 
to Christ and one another will be our good works. If our first 
ove be left, our first works will also be left. Give heed to the 
merciful warning. Will not the Lord perform his word! And 
shall our candlestick be removed out of his placet Shall our 
hurch, or churches, be dissolved and scattered, and our chil- 
dren grow up without light or refuge? Our number is growing 
ess. The church of Ephesus was the Lord's, and yet he 
hreatened to remove it. Our cause, we believe, is the cause of 
3od, and we hold his truth in our churches; yet he may remove 
hem. Let us set ourselves as one man, to enquire whether we 
lave left our first b«ve. If we have, let us try, by the merciful 
earning of the Holy Ghost; by the solemn obligation of ser- 
vants, and the high privilege of brethren to the Lord Jesus, and 
>y all the desire of our greatest earthly comfort, seek to repent 
fed do the first works; — works of unfeigned, fervent love; — 
Porks of willing and dutiful obedience to Christ; — works of 
Christian behavior, through life. The Lord make you perfect 
n love, and preserve you blameless unto the coming day. May 
le spare our churches, and add to their number. Until we 
neet again, either in our Association, or, as we hope, in the 
kingdom of heaven, FAREWELL. 



Tar bo rough N. C Free Press, 



© 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



Contentnea Baptist Association j 

HELD AT 

EDGECOMBE COUNTY, JV. ft 

0» f&e 25th, 2&th, and 21th days of October, 1834, 



SATURDAY, October 25th. 

1. The introductory sermon was delivered by Elder John A. 
Atkinson, from Mark, iii. 14: "And he ordained twelve, that 
they should be with him, and that he might send them forth to 
preach." 

2. The Association then assembled for business, was open- 
ed by prayer, and chose Elders Thomas Dupree, Modera- 
tor; Mark Bennett, Clerk; and George W. Wallace, Assistant 
Clerk. 

^. Brethren in the ministry were invited to sit with us. 

4. Brethren Benjamin Bynutn and Sherrod Tice were ap- 
pointed a committee of finance to examine the state of the trea- 
sury, and to report on Monday next. 

5. Letters from eighteen churches were read, their dele- 
gates' names enrolled, and their changes and present number 
recorded as in the following Table, 



CHURCHES, and Counties 
where situated. 



2 



NAMES OF DELEGATES. 



Autrty's Cree&,Edgecombe 

Bear Creek, Lenoir, 

Beaver Dam, Lenoir, 

Black Creek, Wayne, 

Friendship, Wayne, 

Meadow, Greene, 

Memorial, Wayne, 

JWauhunly, Wayne, 
Oak Grove, Greene, 
Pleasant Hill, Edgecombe 

Pleasant Plains, Wayne, 

Proipect, Duplin, 
Sandy Bottom, Lenoir, 

Toisnot, Edgecombe, 

Town Creek, Edgecombe, 

Tison's, Pitt, 

Union, Edgecombe, 

White Oak, Edgecombe, 



RALEIGH REASONS, Jno. R. iMoore, 

Stephen Wooten, 
Parrot Newborn,* Thomas Dawson, 

William Rouse, 
Aretas Jones, Lewis Williams,* Lofton 

Neathercut,* 
Arthur Barden, William Bass, James 

Barnes, 
James R. Parker, Benajah Herring,* 

John H. Cotton. 
BENJAMIN BYNUM, Joseph Bynum, 

Aaron Joyner, 
Tobias Jones, Wright Bass, Elisha Hol- 
land, 

Mark Heath, John Smith, 
John Ringgold, Titus Carr, 
Jacob Proctor, Frederick Proctor, WiU. 

lie Brake, 
John L, Gray,* Abner Graddy, Alfred 1 

Eilis, 
GEO. VV. WALLACE,* Jesse Hardy, 
William Croom, Adam Goodman, Rich- 
ard Rouse, 
Willie Rountree, Moses Farmer, Larry 

Dew, 
THOMAS DUPREE, JOHN A. AT- 
KINSON, MARK BENNETT, 
SAMUEL MOORE, Willoughby Jones, 

Sherrod Tison, 
Matthew Whitehead, Augustin White- 
head, Jonathan Bailey, 
ICHABOD MOORE, James B. Wood- 
ward, Jonathan Ellis, 

Total, 



£ Jo b, 



24 



7 1 



£* 



52 1 

57 2 

I 
37| 1 



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Elder 



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NOTE, Ordained Ministers are marked in CAPITALS; unordained Ministers in italics; 
those marked thus, * were not present; the last column shows the contributions from the 
Churches. 

■ - ■ " " " i 

6. petitionary letter? were called for. One from the church 
at Prospect M. H. Duplin county, was handed in by their dele- 
gates, and read; and after examination, that church was receiv- 
ed by the Moderator's giving the delegates the right hand of 
fellowship, and enrolled on the list. 

7. Letters of correspondence from sister Associations were 
called for. One from the Kehukee was handed in by their 
messenger, Elder Joshua Lawrence, and read. Verbal infor- 
mation from the Little River was given by Elders Burrell Tem- 
ple and Nathan Gully, accompanied with a file of their Min- 
utes. 

8. Resolved, that this Association will offer to open a cor- 
respondence with the Country Line Association, by letter and 
messengers when convenient; and by letter alone, when not 
convenient for messengers; and that Elder Mark Bennett be 



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Appointed! to write to that Association, and bear the letter; and 
jjhat we tender them fifteen copies of our Minutes. 

9. The circular letter was called for, and referred to a com- 
] tiittee consisting of Elders Bynum, Moore, Lawrence, Swin- 

son, and Temple, for examination— to report on Monday next. 

10. Resolved, that this Association hereafter examine circu- 
ar letters by a committee appointed for that purpose, previous 
o reading them in Association. 

11. Elder John A. Atkinson was appointed to write to the 
Kehukee Association, and Elders Dupree and Bennett to bear 
he letter, and forty copies of our Minutes: Elder Ichaboif 
Moore to write to the Little River, and Elders I. Moore and 
Bynum to bear the letter and twenty copies of our Minutes. 

12. Reslved, that our next Association shall be held at Pleas- 
ant Plains M. H. Wayne county, to commence Friday before 
.he fourth Sunday in October, 1835; that Elder Dnpree is ap- 
pointed to preach the introductory sermon, and Elder Bennett 
in case of failure; worship to begin at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

13. Elders Lawrence and Temple, were appointed to preach 
)n Sunday; worship beginning at half after 10 o'clock, A. M, 

14. Adjourned till Monday next 9 o'clock, A. M. Prayer by 
Elder S. Moore. 

SUNDAY, October 26th, 
Elder Temple opened worship, and preached from 2 Kings,. 
v. 34, 35: "And he went up, and lay upon the child, and put his 
- mouth upon his mouth, and his eyes upon his eyes, and his hatids 
upon his hands: and he stretched himself upon the child, and the 
lesh of the child waxed warm. Then he returned and walked 
n the house to.and fro; and went up and stretched himself upon 
lira and the child sneezed seven times, and the child opened 
lis eyes." Elder Lawrence preached from John, xxi. 15, 16, 
17: "So when they had dined, Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Si- 
mon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me more than these? He saith 
unto him, yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee. He saith 
unto him, Feed my lambs. He saith to him again the second 
time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? He saith unto him, 
yea, Lord; thou knowest that 1 love thee. He saith unto him, 
Fe,PA\ my sheep. He saith unto him the third time, Simon, son 
of Jonas, lovest thou me? Peter was grieved because he said 
unto him the third time, lovest thou me? And he said unto him, 
Lord, thou knowest all things; thou knowest that I love thee. 
Jesus saith unto him, Feed my sheep." The day was showery: 
yet good attention appeared to be given, which, together with 
tJhe faithful ministration of the word, induces the hope that>th& 
Ijetbor will be owned and blessed of the Lord. 



k 



MONDAY, October 27th, 1334. 

15. The Association was opened with prayer by Elder I 
Moore. 

16. The Constitution and Rules of Decorum were read. 

17. The letters of correspondence to sister Association* 
were called for, read, and approved. 

18. Resolved, that the brethren who visited the sister Asso 
eiations be allowed the usual compensation. 

J9. The Committee to examine the circular letter reportec jio 
favorably; and the letter was read, and approved. 

20. Elder Ichabod Moore was appointed to write the circula 
for the next year's minutes. 

21. The committee of finance reported that 

They find now in treasury, - $32 

Received by contributions this year, 




Paid Elders Dupree and Atkinson for attending the Kehu- 

kee Association, - - - - $7 00 

Paid Elders Bynum and Wallace for attending J^ittle Ri- 
ver Association, - - - - 7 00 

Paid for printing last year's Minutes, - - 10 00 

Paid Clerk for his services, - - - 10 00 



34 0( 



Balance remaining in treasury* - - $23 3( 

October 27, 1834. BENJAMIN BYNUM,> r „. 

SHERROD TISON, S h 

22. Elder Mark Bennett was appointed to transcribe anc, 
prepare the? Minutes for press; to have 400 copies printed; anc 
distribute them as formerly; to record one copy in the Associa- 
tion Book, and to continue to act as treasurer. 

23. The list of delegates was called over. 

24- The Minutes were read, and assigned by the Moderator 
and Clerk. 

25. Adjourned by prayer to the time and place appointed. 

THOMAS DUPREE, Moderator. 
MARK BENNETT, Clerk. 



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Vhe Contentnea •Association, asse?nbled at Union M. H. Edgecombe 
county, on the 21th October, 1834, to all the churches and brethren 
composing the Association. 

Dear Brethren: According to former usage we address you by Cir- 
ular. As this kind of letters is offered but once a year, we feel greatly 
mxious to present something that will aid you to grow in grace, and in 
he knowledge of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. We do not 
snow how to do this better than by exhorting you to attend to the light 
| Imd to the 

READING OF THE SCRIPTURES. 
The Bible is the word of God. It contains the matter and sum of all 
: hings concerning the salvation of sinners, and the comfort of saints. Pur- 
suing the letter and the spirit of it, we never wander, never mistake. 
Aside from the scriptures, all else is but the wild superstition of heathen- 
Jfish darkness, or at besi, the imagination of enlightened men. All false 
j'-eligion arises perhaps from false conceptions of God: and as the Bible 
lis all the work that gives correct views of him, we cannot read it too fre- 
quently nor too carefully. The scriptures display his character as creator, 
lind decide whether he willed in sovereignty, or depended on the coun- 
sel and will of others; whether he worked with sovereign power, or de- 
li pended upon the aid of others. They exhibit him in providence and re- 
demption with the same decisions of character. They prescribe the man- 
In er in which he will be worshipped by us, whether it must be by the 
■offering of our bodies, or of our spirits: whether he will be worshipped as 
la merciful God only, or a just as well as a merciful God: whether he will 
■be worshipped as having only a claim of obedience from us, or whether 
Jhe has not a claim of punishment also. The scriptures exhibit him too in 
■the awful and sublime character of judge of quick and dead. Showing 
•us whether in judgment a knowledge of our crimes will be lacking, or not, 
land whether or not, he will call every sin in to judgment. Whether or 
Inot, he will acquit all the human family, or a part, or none: and if he 
acquits an}', they show upon what principle, and if he condemns any, they 
show upon what principle. They show us our relationship to him: wheth- 
er in our primitive state we did or did not, owe him perfect obedience: 
whether we maintained that state by obedience, or fell from it by trans- 
gression: And, if we fell by transgression, whether our transgression ex* 
empted us from the debt of obedience, or incurred a new debt of punish- 
ment or suffering: and if a new debt of punishment, whether it be tem- 
porary or eternal. They show whether transgression did or did not dis- 
qualify us for paying the debt of obedience: and, if it were possible for us 
to pay the debt of obedience, they show us whether that would pny both 
debts, obedience and punishment, and whether one debt will pay two 
which are separate and distinct. If we thus owe a double debt to God, 
which we cannot pay, the scriptures show us whether God has condc - 
scended to grant any discharge or not; and whether that discharge or for- 
giveness be the reward of human works, or the gift of divine grace: wheth- 
er sinful, lost, condemned and wretched man may become t lie child of 
God; whether this is by any change in man or not, either in reforming the 
external deportment, or in repentance toward God, and faith toward 
our Lord Jesus Christ } making him a new creature. They show wheth- 



er such a person loves sin, or holiness; whether he loves Jesus Christ an 
his s f . rvice, or satao and his service: whether a saint of Christ can sin ani 
stiU remain a saint; whether or not he is saved so long as he maintains a 
upright walk, and again condemned as soon as he transgresses; or save 
with everlasting salvation. If the scriptures afford this light, (and a bun 
dantly more,) you will at once agree that there is great advantage in read 
ing them, You will pardon us also for pointing to a few of the disadvan 
tages of not reading them. As often as you read, you hear in a manne 
the voice of your God, your Father whom you love. Not reading, yoi 
lose this privilege. As oft as you read you see, even if it be dimly, th 
face of Jesus Canst, and hear his gracious will concerning you: not reacj 
ing, you lose these blest, enjoyments. By reading, we find whether w< 
have passed from death to lifc; not reading we may continue to be deceiv 
ed. If the HjIv Spirit has wrought the work of salvation within us, ant 
revealed Christ the way, thf- truth and the life to us, reading the scrift 
tures makes the way Jiore open and clear, the truth more sweet, and I hi 
life more delightful and heavenly. You lose, in some degree, the comfor 
of these by not reading. In short, brethren, if you neglect the reading o! 
the scriptures, you will not be prepared to converse with the brethren wit! 
so much satisfaction, you will lose much even in meditation; you will noi 
understand preachiug so well; you will grow more worldly-minded 
lukewarm and cold; more feeble to resist temptation; have less zeal for tht 
prosperity of the church and the cause of God generally; be more liable tc 
receive erroneous doctrine. A sound ministry goes far towards maintain- 
ing the truth in the church; but whenever the church gives over the read- 
ing of the scripture to the ministers, it takes, the first step toward depart 
ing from the truth; and continuing to neglect the reading of God's word, 
the church will sooner or later be seen departed from- the truth and over 
whelmed in error. It sometimes happens that ministers of our own de- 
nomination through mistake, quote that for scripture which is mere tradi 
tion; if you do not read carefully you will receive it and set it down as 
scripture. Men through design may quote wrong, and largely mingle 
iheir own traditious, self-will, and self-choice, and you will not be prepar 
ed to detect them. If the preacher reads a text, which you have not seen 
n6r heard, you may judge there has already been a great neglect of read- 
in^. If you feel more interest in reading men's books than the word of 
God, it augurs badly. The truth of the scriptures is a charge committed 
to the church for safe-keeping; and it is as though the Lord had said, I leave 
my truth in your hands', take care of it till I come. Much depends on 
reading the scriptures; perhaps more than upon all other religious exercises 
put together. May we read them constantly and impartially; and the Lord 
o-ive us understanding in them. May we make them, (and not what men 
think about them,) the rule of our constant faith and practice. The Lord 
be pleased to guide you along the narrow way, and lead you through the 
strait gate to his rest, for the sake of the Lord Jesus; to whom be glory 
throughout all ages, world without end. Amen. 



Free Press —Tar bar a' N, CM 



&z. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 

Contentnea Baptist Association, 

HELD AT 

WAYNE COUffTF, JV. C. 

23d, 24th, and 25th days October, 1835. 

FRIDAY, October 23d. 

The Introductory Sermon was preached by Elder Tho- 
mas Dupc.ee, from 1 Cor. i. 30: "But of him are ye in 
Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom and 
righteousness, and sanctificaiion, and redemption." 

The delegates then assembled for business, and after 
prayer chose Elders Dupree, Moderator; Mark Bennett, 
Clerk; and George VV. Wallace, Clerk Assistant. 

1. The Rules of Decorum and Constitution were read. 

2. A motion was made to amend our Consiitution by 
adding to the seventeenth article thereof, the following: 
"We will not fellowship any member or members of Mis- 
sionary, Bible, Tract, or Sunday School Union Societies, 
nor advocates of Theological Schools, nor any person 
who does fellowship them, nor will we hold any such in 
our churches." After some deliberation it was agreed to 
lay it over till the ensuing day. 

3. Brethren in the ministry from Associations with 
which we correspond, were invited to sit with us. But 
owing to the division of sentiments among us, respecting 
the proposed amendment, they forbore to take seats. 



Piles of Minutes, from the Kehukce Association by Bro- 
ther Richard Rives, from the Little River by Brethren 
Temple and Kenady, and from the Country Line by Bre- 
thren John Sf&dler, James Wilder and James Smith, were 
tendered to us and received. 

3. Brethren Benjamin Bynum and Moses Baker were 
appointed a Committee of Finance; and requested tore- 
port the state of Treasury on Saturday. 

4. Letters from the several churches were read, their 
delegates' names enrolled, and their changes since last 
year's sitting noted as follows:— 



CHURCHES 

and Counties 
where situa- 


NAMES OF DELEGATES. 


| 




re 

-s 


1 


H 

ra 

5, 


b 

es 

re 

? 




5. © 


ted. 




p. 




B« 




a. 


ft. 


Co 


#Cts 


Aulrey's creek 


RALEIGH REASONS,* Jno. R. Moore, 






_ 












Edgecombe, 


Robt. Rasberry, 


2 








1 




53 


1 00 


Bear Creek. 


Parrot Newborn, Richd. Smith, Thos. 


















Lenoir, 


Dawson, 


9 








3 


2 


66 


2 00 


Beaver Dam, 


Aretas Jones, Lewis William?, Lofton 


















Lenoir, 


Neathercut, 








2 






35 


1 50 


Black Creeks 


Arthur Barden, William Bass, James 


















Way tie » 


Barnes, 


3 




1 


3 


2 




67 2 00 


Friendship, 


George Herring,* Henry Sasser, Bena- 














1 


Wayne. 


jah Herring, 


5 


1 










26; 1 25 


Meadow, 


BENJAMIN BYNUM, John Joyner,* 














i 


Greene, 


Joseph Bynum,* 








3 


1 


2 


22, 1 SO 


Memorial, 


Elisha Holland,* Wright Bass, 














15! 1 00 


Wayne, 
















1 


Nauhunly, 


Calvin Coor, Silas Pate, Shadrach Pate, 


7 






2 






65; 2 00 


Wayne, 




















Oak Grove, 


Matt. H. Carr, William Savage,* John 


















Greene, 


Ringgold, 


3 












15 


1 00 


Pleasant Hill, 


Jacob Proctor, Frederick Proctor,* Da- 
















Edgecombe, 


vid Nolly,* 








] 






20 


1 00 


Pleasant Pla- 


Joel Hines, Dennis Glissen, Wm. Lane, 


1 


1 




2 






32 


1 50 


ins, Wayne, 




















Protpect, 


GEO. W. WALLACE, Jesse Hardy, 


















Ouplin, 


Windall Davis, 


3 








1 




14 1 


Bed Banks, 


James Griffin, Lanier Griffin, Jno. Mc- 


















Pitt, 


Gowns. 














61 


1 50 


Sandy Bottom 


Richard Rouse, William Croom, Wm. 


















Lenoir, 


H. Whitfield* 


1 










2 


25 1 


Toisnot, 


Larry Dew, Moses Farmer, Willie Roun- 


















Edgecombe, 


tree, 


2 






4 




] 


69 


1 50 


Town Creek, 


THOMAS DUPREE, Moses Baker, 


















Edgecombe, 


MARK BENIN ETT, 








1 


2 


] 


93 


1 50 


Tison's, Pitt j 


SAMUEL MOORE, Willoughby Jones, 
Sherrod Tison * 








2 






15 


1 00 


Union, 


Matthew Whitehead,* Augustin White- 


















Edgecombe, 


head, Wm. Robbms, 






2 






4 


60 


1 50 


White Oak, 


ICHABOD MOORE, Solomon Barnes,* 


















Edgecombe, 


Jonathan Ellis, 


3 


2 




1 






20 


1 00 




Total, 


39 


4 


3 


21 


JO 


12 


771 


26 25 



NOSE, Ordained Ministers are maiked in CAPITALS; unordained Ministers in 
italics; these marked thus, * were not present; the last column shows the contri- 
butions from the Churches. 



4. Inquired whether there were any petitionary letters 
for membership in this Association; when one from he 
church at Red Banks, Pitt county, was presented hy their 
delegates, James Griffin and Lanier Griffin, and read; and 
the church was received, and entered on she list as above. 
Another from the church at Hancock's, Pitt counly, was 
handed in by the delegation from Red Banks, and read; 
but that church was not received, their delegates not being 
present. 

5. The Circular Letter was called for, and referred to a 
committee consisting of Brethren Dupree, S. Moore and 
Bennett for examination; with a request that they report 
on the morrow. 

Adjourned by prayer to Saturday morning, 9 o'clock? 
A. M. 

SATURDAY, October 24th. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister Associations 
were called for. One from White Oak Association was 
presented by Brethren P. Pucket and David H. Bell, and 
read; and their messengers took seats wish us. Letters 
from the Kehukee and Little River Associations, by lheii\ 
messengers aforenamed and read. 

7. The committtee appointed to examine the Circular 
Letter reported: that it be read in the Association. It 
was read and ordered to be annexed to these Minutes. 

8. Took under consideration the amendment of the 
Constitution and after considerable debate, the question 
for amendment was carried; and the seventeenth article 
together with the amendment was ordered to be inserted 
at length, which is as follows: 

Art. 17. We will not countenance any preacher who shall travel 
within the bounds of our Association, establishing societies for the 
collection of money, or who may himself be collecting money to sup- 
port any institution whatever. We will not fellowship any member 
or members of Missionary, Bible, Tract, or Sunday School Union 
Societies, nor advocates of Theological Schools, nor any person who, 
dees fellowship them; nor will we hold any such in our churches. 

The invitation to brethren in the ministry from corres- 
pondent Associations, was renewed; whereupon they came 
forward and took seats with us. 

9. Brethren Dupree ami Bennett were appointed to vi- 
sit the Kehukee Association next fall; Bynum and* I. 
Moore to visit the Little River and Country Line; i. Moore 
and Bennett, the White Oak: and the messengers to eack- 



4 

respectively to write and carry the letters of correspon- 
dence. 

Agreed to send 40 copies of our Minutes (o the Kehq- 
kee Association, 20 to the Little River, 20 Jo the Coun- 
try Line, and 15 to the White Oak. 

10. Our next Annual Session is appointed to be held at 
White Oak M. H. Edgecombe county, to commence Fri- 
day before the fourth Sunday in October, 1836; Mark 
Bennett to preach the Introductory Sermon, and Elder 
John A. Atkinson if the former fail: worship to begin at 
11 o'clock, A. M. 

11. Brethren John Stadler. Burwell Temple, and Tho- 
mas Dupree were appointed to preach on Sunday, wor- 
ship to begin at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

12. The Committee of Finance reported: 

Balance in the treasury last year, - - $23 30 

Contributions the present year, - T 26 25 

$49 55 
Paid Elder Dupree for attending Kehukee Assoc r n, $5 00 
Paid Elder Bennett for attending the Country Line, 2 3.7 
Paid for printing last year's Minntes, - 10 00 

iVid Clerk for services, * - - 10 00 

27 37 



Balance remaining in the treasury, - - $22 18 

Oct. 24th, 1835. BENJ. BYNUM, > n ' . 

MOSES BAKER, ^ on ?-*' n > 

13. Appointed M. Bennett to write a Circular to ac~ 
company our uekt Minuter. 

14. Appointed the present Clerk to prepare these Min- 
utes for press, to have 400 copies printed and distributed 
amongst the churches, and record one copy on the Associ 
ation Book. 

15. The list of delegates was called over. 

16. The Minutes were read and assigned by the Mode- 
rator and Clerk. 

Adjourned to the lime and place appointed by prayer. 
THOMAS DUPREE, Mod'rV 
MARK BENNETT, Cl'k. 



5 

SUNDAY, October 25th. 
A large assemblage met at the stage. Elder Stadler 
preached from [sn. Ix. 21: "Thy people also shall be all 
righteous: ihey shall inherit the land forever, the branch 
of my planting, the work of my hands, that I may be glo- 
rified. 5 ' Elder Temple succeeded and preached from St. 
John, xv. 1, 2: "1 am the true vine, and my Father is the 
husbandman. Every branch in me that beareth not fruit 
lie laketh away: and every branch that beareth fruit, he 
purgeth it, that it may bring forth more fruit." Elder 
Dupree declined preaching, and Elder P. Pucket preach- 
ed from Ixxiii. Psalm, 28: "It is good for me to draw near 
to God." The wind was high and bleak. The congre- 
gation mostly were attentive. The servants of God were 
faithful and much engaged. We hope the weaklings of 
the flock were strengthened; and the people of God re- 
freshed: The Lord make the word effectual in gathering 
together into one the children of God that are scattered 
abroad. 



The Contenlnea Association, now sitting at Pleasant Plains Meeting 
House, Wayne county, this 25th day of October s 1835, to the Chur- 
ches they represent. 

Beloved Brethren: No doubt you will be looking for a Circu- 
lar Letter, written upon some subject of importance. We have no 
other subject on our minds at present but the memorable subject of 
Religion, from which if God will, we shall undertake to offer you 
some Cew thoughts, and in doing this it behoves us to offer some defi- 
nition of the word religion. The understanding we have of this word 
is divine faith and worship and reverence of God. However, it is 
Refined by others, binding together; by others, inward piety of heart 
whereby God is acknowledged; while another says, it consists in the 
resolution of the will for God, and to avoid whatever we are persua- 
ded he disapproves. The word religion only occurs in scripture 
(perhaps) five times, and if the whole heathen mythology was search- 
ed, we know not whether it is to be found. Although there vyas no- 
thing said about religion, or the term not used in scripture till the 
days of the apostles, religious devotions were practiced in a very ear- 
ly age of the world; for we hear in scripture, men began to call on 
the name of the Lord, which implies they worshipped God. Again: 
Abel offered to God a sacrifice which was accepted — see Genesis. 



But Cain brought of the fruit of the ground for his offering, which 
was not received. Therefore we see plainly two sj^stems of religion 
set up in the world, the one a pure religion, and the other a false or 
spurious one. 1st, All false religion or the principles of it was com- 
municated to our fore parents in the garden of Paradise, and has, 
been in exercise more or less from that day to this; false or spurious 
religion proceeds from our depraved nature or a false conception of 
God; and in proportion to the views we entertain of ourselves and 
God, so we set up our forms of worship. Man in his depraved state 
is not without some knowledge of the Supreme Being; but the views 
which lie entertains of him, can never enable him to worship in a 
pure or holy manner. But to prove the fact stated, we bring the 
following scripture: For the invisible things of him from the creation 
of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that 
are made, even his eternal power and godhead, so that they are with- 
out excuse, Romans, i. 20. We only shall divide religion into four 
general heads, viz: the heathen religion, the Roman religion, the Ma- 
hometan religion, and the Christian religion. To enlarge on all we 
have proposed would extend far beyond the bounds of a Circular, ne- 
vertheless we will glean a little as we pass on. 

First. It is evident that the heathen had some knowledge of the 
true and living God, or they would not have had so many idol gods, 
which it is not expedient far us to name here; but it is a plain proof 
that there is one true God, and we read of no other characters de- 
nying his existence but the fool, and he said in his heart, "there is no 
God." The heathen gods were dumb and deaf, could neither see 
nor smell, and yet on critical occasions, or in times of distress, they 
invoked these gods. This is proven by the impudent act of Goliaii 
of Gath. Again: by the case of Nebuchadnezzar, when he wanted 
Daniel to worship his gods — see Daniel. However, some of their 
gods were beasts, which were no better than stock or stone. Not- 
withstanding they done sacrifice to them, and reposed confidence in 
their gods, they could not save them. Moreover, it is said the hea- 
then religion can hardly be entitled a system, since the votaries there- 
of are subject to the most gross vices. 

2d. Under the tyranny of the pagans the followers and worship- 
pers of God suffered many very many abuses, and even death itself. 
See the unlawful decree of Nebuchadnezzar, recorded by Daniel the 
prophet, as well as others. The second thing we shall notice is, the 
religion of theChurch of Rome, which is said to have been in infancya 
branch of the true church of Jesus Christ. We will ask the reader if 
the church a>t Corinth in Greece was not entitled to the same honor 
-— the church at Fhilippi,in Macedonia — the church at Galatia — the 
church at Collossia, and the seven churches in Asia, with many 
others? Therefore, we do not see any cause why the church at Rome, 
should claim any pre-eminence over those other churches, as to age 
or quality; and if she did ever possess any over the rest, it is now 
nothing to her glory; for it is certain from the best authors we have 
who wrote of her proceedings, that she swerved from the Chrisiiati 



7 

faith from time to time, until she and her votaries went iisto lascivi- 
ousness, and went on to elect popes, cardinals, and peers, and estab- 
lish persecution against the true church or followers of Jesus Christ 
in several kingdoms, wearing names, titles and offices which Christ 
nor his apostles never did, nor intend should be given to officers of the 
church; which names are unwarranted in the New Testament. And 
by their influence they troubled kingdoms, established ecclesiastical 
laws, put many saints to death, proclaimed themselves Vicar to 
Christ, successor of St. Peter, having power to forgive all manner of 
sins, past, present, and to come; which is more than Christ himself 
ever assumed to do. Moreover they established universities, theolo- 
gical seminaries, the mass, infant sprinkling, preaching (as they 
said) men out of purgatory, selling indulgences, pardons, and in the 
mean time forbidding to marry — would not have wives of their own, 
but wanted every other man's-— and went so far as to worship the re- 
lics of the dead. Many other errors they were guilty of, which we 
shall not now notice. And popery is only paganism refined, or no- 
thing heller, and if you want a proof of all this, see Fox's History of 
Martyrs, the Biography of John Wickliffe, Zuinglish, Patrick, Ham- 
ilton, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Buck on the Church oi Rome, 
and many other writers on the same subjects. Some of these men in 
the years 14, 15 and 1600, set her at defiance and proved to the 
world that she was nothing more or less than the beast which the 
revelator saw having seven heads and ten horns; and made it appear 
she was anti-Christ. We shall only now observe, that Christian 
Rome, (as it. is called) done more injury to the followers of Cod, and 
put to death more saints, than ever pagan Rome did. 

3d. We now come on to take a short notice of the Mahometan 
religion. It appears Mahomet was a Persian, or born under the 
reign of the Persian empire, about the beginning of the seventh cen- 
tury. His father being poor and dying when his son was young, he 
was necessarily raised by his friends and married a rich widow, which 
gave him many advantages; and he made use of them for the purposes 
of establishing a new system of religion and to break down paganism; 
which religion he was successful in setting up in several countries in 
a short time. He first fixed his plan, converted his wife and near 
relations, and ricSi and noble friends; and by his own intrigues and 
the assistance of his friends, he proselyted a sufficient number of men 
and took the sword and forced his religion. The reason why men 
embraced the Mahometan religion was, they were afraid of Mahom- 
et's sword; and it is presumable the overthrow of this religion will 
be caused by universal war, inasmuch as we think Mahomet is the 
false prophet that John saw in the Revelations, and the beast the law 
religion. And the beast was taken and with him the false prophet 
that wrought miracles before him, with which be deceived them that 
had received the mark of the beast, and them that worshipped his 
image. These both were cast alive into a lake of fire, burning with 
brimstone, Revelations, 19th and 20th. This religion is founded 
pretty much in the belief of one God, and that .Mahomet was his 



8 
prophet. They believe the most of the Old Testament is of divine 
authority. Mahomet sets himself nearly upon an equality with Jesus 
Christ, but says he is the last prophet. He also has a number of 
other sentiments which there is not room here for. This religion is 
no better than the former, as men cannot be saved without Jesus 
Christ; therefore, we shall leave it and come to the last thing propos- 
ed — see Buck on Mahomet. 

4th. We shall now proceed to notice the Christian religion, and 
in order to set it forth in its proper colors, we shall try to find what 
kind of religion the church at Antioch possessed, or believed in. 
Now they which were scattered abroad upon the persecution that arose 
about Stephen, travelled as far as Phoenicia, and Cyprus, and An- 
tioch, &ic. It is also said some of them were men of Cyprus and 
Gyrene, which when they were come to Antioch spake unto the 
Grecians preaching the Lord Jesus. And the hand of the Lord was 
with them, and a great number believed and turned unto the Lord. 
Barnabas was also sent, whom when he came, preached (we believe) 
the Lord Jesus — however, the scripture said, saw the grace of God 
and was glad, and exhorted them all with purpose of heart to cleave 
unto the Lord. He then went to Tarsus, and found Saul, and they 
returned to Antioch and assembled themselves with the church, and 
taught much people, and the disciples were called Christians first in 
Antioch, see Acts, 1 1th chapter, from the 19th to 27th verse. Bar- 
nabas was a man full of the Holy Ghost. St. Paul was a Christian 
and believed in the Chrisian religion, and practiced the worship of 
them and taught Christians, with the rest of the apostles, the perfect 
rule of faith and practice, as you will see in all his epistles to the 
Christian churches. A (ew words relative to what the primitive 
Christians believed. They believed in the Lord Jesus Christ, that 
he was the Son of God, the only Saviour of sinners; that he was God 
manifest in the flesh; that he was God one with the Father. They 
believed the Holy Ghost was one with the Father and the Son. and 
was engaged in the work of redemption; for there are three that bare 
record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost; and 
these three are one. This language proceeded from John's own lips. 
God never was manifest to Adam in a trinity of persons till after the 
fall, yet he did exist as such; which appears from his own words: Go 
to, let us make man in our own image. We could bring many other 
proofs, see the New Testament abounding with proofs, but we have 
not time to insert them here. We next proceed to inform you that 
no unregenerated man is a Christian, let his profession be what it 
may; but is a foreigner and an alien without hope and without God 
in the world. Thus having incorrect views of the Supreme Being, 
and of himself, he always worships incorrectly; in a word, a bad 
principle never produces a good work, which agrees with the words 
of our Saviour: Make the tree good and the fruit will be good also. 
But men in these modern times say, they are making Christians almost 
as fast as they want, but by what means? IVJost ministers, or our Ar- 
minian ministers, tell the people the atonemeut is general, and the 



9 

spirit of God strives with every body, and if they will believe, which 
is possible for them to do at any tirue, and reform, that is enough. 
God is merciful and he will save them, say they, this is the Christian 
religion. We have not so learned Christ, and we never knew any 
tree to change itself or its fruit, neither have we ever known any tree 
to change another tree or alter its fruit; when the Ethiopian can 
change his skin, or the leopard his spots, then may an unregenerate 
man make himself a Christian; and then may men make Christians, 
and not till then. 

To prove our position we will stale a case. Suppose here is a 
spring which in former limes produced good water, but some enemy 
poisoned the spring and of course it produced poisonious water, and 
before it is fit for use the spring must be cleansed. We ask, there- 
fore, can the spring cleanse itself, or can any other cleanse it? we 
think not. The Arminian says, the way to cleanse it is to send your 
servants and make thern work upon the stream below, and cleanse all 
the waters that run out of the spring and that is the right way. ]f 
that be the way, what will be done with what runs out, after such 
cleansing, seeing the fountain remains untouched? the waters will be 
like the original. Will they work on the outward passions of men, 
and the heart from whence all the actions flow is untouched. And 
when they sin again (say they) they have fallen from grace, when it 
should have been they fell for lack of grace. There is another set of 
preachers that are manufactured over, according to the schemes of 
the day, that say, O no, brother Arminian, yon are a little mistaken; 
let us prescribe a plan whereby sinners hearts can be cleansed, or 
that spring above named. They then proceed to say, destitute places, 
souls are going to hell in ignorance for want of the gospel preached 
to them; the Brahmins are perishing for the word of iife, and 
Hindoos, &c. and we have just studied out a plan to save them. 
What plan, Sirs? Why let us erect theological schools, State conven- 
tions, religious schools in different parts of the United States, and 
polish men to work upon the bad spring above named, or sinners 
hearts; and learn them to persuade men and beg them out of their 
money, and in a short time we can have servants a plenty. (Agreed, 
for if you want martins set up a plenty of gourds and you will have 
them.) However, they have proceeded to all the above, and are 
sending lazy young men, who are not willing to work, that can beg 
even a shilling from a negro, and all he can get from others in better 
stations of life, to carry their point. Say to him (or any of his 
class,) Sir, who sent you to preach, and what is your motive? He 
(perhaps holding a temperance paper in his hand) will answer, such 
or such a Board of Missions sent me. They are in want of a little 
money, and cannot you help us to some? They have learned to 
cry to congregations and to private individuals, God loves the cheer- 
ful giver and deceive the people and carry off their money, and per- 
haps preach them an Arminian or a money begging sermon, and 
leave the spring uncleaned or their souls unsaved. We will just 
remind the reader, where the money beggars are gone to Hindostan 



10 

there is a salubrious climate, a fertile country, gold and silver mines 
and no doubt but a rich reward like this will be an effectual call to a 
number of these fellows. What is the sign of their call to the minis- 
try? 1st. Every power of their souls being filled with the love of 
money, which is the root of all evil. 2d. To put on a cloak of hyp- 
ocrisy. 3d. To beg well. 4th. Put on two coats. 5th. From 
the study of Dr. Gill's divinity anli exposition of the scriptures, and 
others. 6th. The glory of the schemes of the day, &c. and thereby 
deceiving the people. But there are two or three ways by which 
they are known: 1st. by their wearing two coats; 2d. by their beg- 
ging of money; and 3d. by their sowing discord among the brethren. 
All such religion is nothing better than popery. So they leave the 
hearts of men unclean. 

Next we shall proceed to show how the fountain is cleansed, or the 
way to cleanse it. Begin in the very bottom of the fountain and 
take away every thing that/ defiles it, and the water will be good. 
And this is the way God cleanses the hearts of men, and makes them 
Christians. God the Holy Ghost kills the poison of sin, and kills 
the sinner to the love and practice of sin; changes the heart and 
shows the sinner the unholiness of his nature; brings to his view his 
own perfection and holiness, and the man dies to his former prospects 
of getting to heaven. The apostle said, sin revived and I died; and 
again, God granted repentance unto life, and gives faith by which the 
man believes in the Lord Jesus Christ. He is thus born again, as 
the apostles and primitive Christians were, born not of the flesh nor 
of blood, nor of the will of man, but of God. This is the way the 
hearts of men are changed, and from thence proceed good fruits as the 
United Baptists, who are changed as they were in Antioch, and follow 
the same rule of faith and practice. Again: pure religion and unde- 
nted before God and the Father is this, to visit the fatherless and the 
widows in their affliction, and to keep themselves unspotted from the 
world; which shows it must be a pure heart to perform this work. 
For when the Christian does this work he has no claim on the Su- 
preme Being at all. In his visit to the house of mourning his religion 
is pure, because it proceeded from a pure heart or soul. He dis- 
charges a Christian duty, prays for the afflicted, and perhaps comforts 
them, knowing not but God may bless his visit to their souls good; 
for God evidently saw the end of all his work before he pushed it 
into existence, and appointed his means to effect his work. One 
means is the preaching of the word- — for it pleased God by the fool- 
ishness of preaching to save them that believe. But see one of God's 
preachers come forward and say, Sir, who sent you to preach, and 
what sign do you give of your call? He will say, 1 believe Jesus 
Christ called me; now for the sign — I was once a hater of his king- 
don, and had no delight in holiness, but I hope he has changed my 
heart, for now I love a holy life and the more like Jesus any Christian * 
is, the better I love him; and after this change took place, the worth 
of souls wus imprest on my mind, the welfare of Zion, the honor of 
the Christian cause and the glory of God; all these lay so heavy qu 



11 

me I had an extreme burden, he. and necessity was laid on me to 
preach the gospel, and wo is me if 1 preach not the gospel. So the 
man goes without hire or reward, only he carries his reward with 
him. So he goes and strikes right at the fountain of sin in the heart; 
God the Holy Ghost sending conviction home and changing the 
heart as at Antioeh. Of such are the Baptists in this Association, 
and some others, made Christians by the eternal Gcd. Therefore, 
beloved brethren, make it manifest that }^ou are in possession of pure 
religion, this dark time of the night. Pray without ceasing, and fill 
your seat in meeting houses, and be temperate but not abstain; and 
above all things, love one another and keep the unity of the spirit in 
the bond of peace. Read the Bible every day of your lives, that you 
may know what the will of the Lord is. Hold out faithful to the 
end, and you have the promise of a crown of life; for the day will 
surely come when we, (if we be Christians,) shall all meet in that 
great Association above, where parting shall be no more and sorrows 
never come. May God grant us a happy entrance into that Asso- 
ciation, for Christ's sake. Amen. 



Tarhoro 1 Press. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

Contentnea Baptist Association^ 

HELD AT 

WHITE OAK MEETING IIOUSE, 

21st, 22d, and 23d days of October, 1836. 



FRIDAY, October 21st. 

The introductory discourse was delivered by Mark 
Bennett from (Rum. xvi. 17, 18.) Now 1 beseech you, 
brethren, mirk them which ciuse divisions and offences 
contrary to the doctrine which ye have learned; and avoid 
them. For they ihat are such serve nut our Lord Jhsus 
Christ, but their own belly; and by good words and fair 
Speeches deceive the hearts of the simple. 

The delegates then assembled for business, and after 
prayer chose Thomas Dupree Moderator, Mark Bennett 
Clerk, and John A. Atkinson Clerk Assistant. 

Corresponding Messengers and brethren i»» the ministry 
from corresponding Associations, were invited to seats 
with us; Wm. Hyman from Kehukec; Burwell Templb* 
Eli Holland, James K. Barbour from Little River; Par- 
ham Pucket from White Oak; John Stadler, Thomas 
Gibson, Robert McKee, Stephen I. Chandler and 
Joel Bolton, from Country Line; and Ashley 8waim 
from the Abbot's Creek Union Association, took seats 
with us. 

1. Read the Constitution and Rules of Decorum. 

2. Appointed Benj. Bynura and Sherrod Tice a com- 
mittee of Finance. 



2 
3. Letters from the several churches were read, their 
delegates' names enrolled, and their changes since last 
year's silting noted as follows: 



Churches and 






counties where- 
in situated. 


NAMES OF DELEGATES. 


N 

a. 




■ 4* 


1 ft. 


. i _ 


a Si 


Jwtry's Creek, 


Raleigh Reasons, Jno. R. Moore, 












I 


#Cts, 


Edgecombe. 


Robert Rasbury, 








1 




2 50 


1 00 


Beaver Dam, , 


Aretas Jones, Lewis Williams,* 












j 




Lenoir. 


Lofton Neathercut, 














35 


1 50 


Meadow, 


Benj. Bynum, Wm. Williams,* 


















Greene. 


Aaron Joyner, 
















1 50 


Memorial, 


Wright Bass, Elisha Holland, Ja- 


















Wayne. 


cob Barnes,* 


2 






1 






19 


1 00 


Nauhunty, 


Wm. Exum, Silas Pate, Wright 


















Wayne. 


Taylor,* ^ 








617 




41 


1 50 


Pleasant Hill, 


Jacob Proctor, Willie Brake, 












! 


Ectg'< combe 


Fred. Proctor, 












v», n 


Pleasant Plains 


W 7 right Smith, Alfred Ellis, Joel 
















Wayne. 


Hines, 














\7\ 1 50 


Red Banks, 


James Griffin, Lanier Griffin,* 
















Pitt. 


Caleb Nelson, 












1 


61 1 50 


Sandy Bottom, 


Wm. Croom, Richard Rouse, Ev- 














\ 


Lenoir. 


ans VVhaley, 












1 


23 i 15 


Tison's, Pitt. 


Samuel Moore, Willoby Jones,* 


















Sherrod Tison, 




1 








14 1 00 


Town Creek, 


Thos. Dupree, Jno. A. Atkinson, 
















Edgecombe. 


M. Bennett, 


1 






1 






69 1 50 


Union, 


M. Whitehead^ A. Whitehead,! 












Edgecombe. 


Jona. Bailey, 


1 








2 2 


57 1 50 


White Oak, 


Jena. Ellis, Jas. B. Woodward, 














Edgecombe. 


Ichabod Moore, - l|* J 1 




20 1 00 


Total, 5 1 10 


19 6 


426 16 65 



4. Petitionary letters were enquired for. 

5. The circular letter was palled for, handed in, and re- 
ferred to a committee, consisting of B. Bynum, J. A. At- 
kinson, J. Stadler, A. Swaim, and she mod < rator. 

6. Letters of correspondence were enquired for, — A 
letter and file of minutes from the K^hukee and White 
Oak Associations, and minutes fri>ri> the Little River, 
Country Line and Abbot's Creek Union, were presented 
by their messengers above named. 

7. Thos. Dupree, J. A. Atkinson and Mark Ber.nett 
were appointed to visit the Kehukee Association; Jacob 
Proctor, I. Moore and B. Bynum, ihe Little Rive*; B. 
Bynum. Wm. Exum and Jam^s Griffiu, inn Country Line, 
and B. Bynum and James Griffin the Abbot's Creek Union; 
and I. Moore and M. Benneti to visit the White Oak. 

Adjourned to Saturday, 10 o'clock, A. M. 



$10 00 
10 00 


$38 83 


2 00 - 


- 22 00 



SATURDAY, October 22nd. 
The list of delegates was called over, and absentees 
noted. 

8. The committee to whom the circular was referred 
for examination reported: They find no fault with it, but 
recommend it to the consideration of the Association. It 
was then read in the Association; and ordered to be at- 
tached to our present minutes. 

9. The Committee of Finance reported as follows: 

Balance remaining in the treasury last year, - $22 IB 

Contributions at this Association* - - 16 65 



Paid for printing minutes last year, 
Paid Clerk for services, 

Paid Elder Dupree for attending Kehukee As- 
sociation, 

Now in the treasury - . - $16 8$ 

22nd October, 1826. 

SHERROD TIS0N,> r 
BENJ. BYNUM, $ ^ om * 

10. Appointed J. A. Atkinson to write a circular to 
accompany our next minutes. 

11. Appointed VVm. Hyman, John Stadler, and Ashley 
Swaim, to preach on Sunday: to begin at 10 o'clock. 

12. Agreed that our next annual meeting be at Town 
Creek M. H. Edgecombe County, to commence Friday 
before the fourth Sunday in October 1837; Benjamin By- 
num to preach the introductory sermon, or Ichabod Moore 
m case of failure: worship to begin at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

13. Appointed Mark Bennett to prepare these minutes 
for the press, to have 400 copies printed, and distributed 
as usual, and to record one copy on the Association Book. 

14. The minutes were read and subscribed by the mode- 
rator and clerk. 

Then adjourned to the time and place appointed, as 
above. 

THOMAS DUPREE, Moderator. 
MARK BENNETT, Clerk. 

SUNDAY, October 23rd. 

Brother Thomas Gibson introduced worship by singing 

and prayer; after which brother Swaim preached from 

Heb. vi. 17. Wherein God, willing more abundantly to 

show unto the beirs of promise the immutability of his 



V. 



4 

counsel, confirmed itbyanonth. Brother Stadler next 
preached from 2 Tim. ii 7 ponsider what 1 say; and 
the Lord give thee understanding in all things. Brother 
Hyman concluded worship, after a few pertinent remarks, 
by prayer and singing. — The word of the Lord was faith- 
fully preached. Our hearts felt, Bless the Lord for such 
preaching; our tongues said, Bless the Lord for such 
preaching; and our pen records, B|ess the Lord for such 
preaching. 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 

The delegates and brethren composing the Contentnea Baptist As- 
sociation, assembled at White Oak meeting house, Edgecombe 
county, N. C. 22d, 23d and 24th of October, 1836, to the several 
churches of said Association, with brotherly kindness: — 

Dear brethren in Christ, God in his providence has granted 
us the privilege to meet .and sit together again according to our last 
year's appointment. It affords matter for unfeigned humility and 
thankfulness that, amidst all our frailties, follies and excesses, our 
sloth, ingratitude and lukewarmness, >ur worldly-minfledness, vani- 
ty and pride, vye yet enjoy these manifestations that the loving kind- 
ness of our God changes not, and his tender mercies fail not. Pray- 
ing that we all may feel deeply sensible of this great grace, and that 
we may pass the time of our sojourning here in fear, and in the love 
of God, we will call your attention to a few remarks, touching 

THE WASHING OF ONE ANOTHER'S FEET. 

And first: Ought this to be observed as a practice amongst the 
people of God. cr not? 

Secondly: If it ought to be observed, then, Under what circum- 
stances should it be practised? 

Thirdly: Have not the circu?nstances under which it is to be 
performed, been made the occasion for shunning this condescend- 
ing duty, and so, of evading the cross of Christ? 

Fir^: Ought this to be observed as a practice amongst the peo- 
ple of God, cr nof? 

Whh r>\spect to the obligation, our Lord has said, Ye also ought 
to wash one another's feet* (John, xiii. 14.) We consider that it 
would be vanity and impiety for any to argue, that the form of this 
injunction differs from an express command, by saying, for instance, 
in the institution of the Supper there is an express command — this 
do; while in the case of washing feet it is said, ye ought.. For 
if we can exercise a discretion to dispense with what Christ has 
said we ought to do, then it is difficult to say where sueh a discretion 
might not carry us: and whether it might not lead us to dispense 
with any of hi* commands The obligation is enforced by Christ's 
example: As I have washed your feet, so ye also ought, &c With 
regard to the people concerned, they were I he people of God. 
The words were addressed specially to them, and to no others: Ye 



5 

aught to wash one another's feet. As it regards the continuance as 
a practice, our Saviour does not express how often his disciples 
should repeat it, but simply speaks the obligation and leav(^ ihe 
subject. Yet 32 years after the command was given, the apostle 
Paul, who understood the subject, mentions it as a requisite prac- 
tice amongst the saints. (1 Tim. v. 10.) We therefore 1 conclude 
that it ought to be observed as a practice amongst Ihe people of God. 
Secondly: If it ought to be observed, then, Under what circum- 
stances should it be practised? 

Should it n<>t be practised in the churches as a church ordinance? 
We answer, No Because, 1. women performed it. (I Tim. v. 10.) 
2. Women were no where required to administer, or to assist in the 
public ministration of, church ordinances. 3. Members of the 
church were not required in the management of then houses and 
families, or in entertaining the brethren, to practice a church ordi- 
nance. But it should be performed 1. by both, men and women: 
2. at their own private dwelling*: 3. to professors of religion who 
come to lodge with them: 4. as an act ot kindness and hospitality 
in affording them hearty entertainment: 5. as among the good works 
which Christians should be careful to maintain: 6. and the whole in 
honor to Christ. Let not a widow be taken into the number un- 
der threescore years old, having been the wife of one man, well 
reported of for good works; if she have brought up children, if she 
have lodged strangers, if she have washed the saints' feet, if she 
have relieved the affliced, if she have diligently followed every 
go^d work. (1 Tim. v. 9, 10.) These are the chief of the circum- 
stances bv which this practice should be regulated. 
§ Thirdly: Have not the circumstances under which it is to b& 
performed, been m ude the occasion for shunning this condes- 
cending duty, and so. of evading the cross of Christ? 
^ There are, among the Baptists, those who think feet washing 
should be publicly celebrated in the churches, as an accompaniment 
of the Supper; yet the more part have given up this point as un- 
tenable. Having once settled the question that it is not to be prac- 
tised in ihe churches, many have, it is to be feared, laid aside the 
subject as having no farther concern with it. The act requires a 
stoop which the old man in every Christian, feels a repugnance to 
make. And if it is to be performed as an act of hospitality in cases 
of necessity, then we too easily persuade ourselves that such ca*es 
of necessity seldom or never occur. We are apt to take up the 
proverb, and plead that, in sandy countries where pf op'e travel 
afoot, feet washing becomes necessary: but in our own country and 
by our manner of travelling, the necessity of the practice is su- 
perseded. Besides, says pride, it were impolite to ask a man or 
a woman at our houses to have his or her feet washed. Bui we 
think, Brethren, it is safer to abide by the scriptures. Abraham did 
not think it impolite. (Gen. xviii. 4.) To ask them to eat, to drink, 
to go to rest, to wash their face, are acts of kindness: and Chris- 
tians, diligent to follow every good work, would ask them to have 
their feet washed; and the humble Christian would not refuse. 
If it were to be conducted before the eyes of the church, few, per- 
haps, would draw back: but as it is, we can neglect it without our 
brethren's knowledge. Hence we thiak thai the circumstances 



6 

connected with its right performance, hare been unjustly rendered 
an occasion for shunning this duty, and evading the cross. 

If we are not mistaken, Beloved Brethren, the practice of washing 
one another's feet, has long been almost entirely neglected It has 
not by many been practised in any form. We wish you to exa- 
mine this our Circular, and compare it with the scriptures: and if 
you find we have taken a scriptural view of the subject, let us with 
one consent agree not to pass it by as a thing of nought, but 
practise, among all other good works, that which is our duty, and 
the humblest stoop in the Christian's life. And yet in another 
sense it is no stoop, since it is in conformity with the example 
of our Lord and Saviour. Trust in the testimony of Jesus. Try to 
live in the faith and patience of the saints. May the Lord preserve 
you by his grace, and keep you by his power through faith unto 
salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. Worship God. 
Unto him be glory in the church by Christ Jesus, throughout all 
ages, world without end. Amen. 



T*rlor&\JY.C.)JPrm r 






6m 



MINUTES 



OF THE 

Contentnea Baptist Association, 

HELD WITH 

THE CHURCH AT OLD TOWN CREEK, 

20-22 of October, 1837. 

FRIDAY, October 20th, 
The Introductory Sermon was delivered by Elder Ben 
jamin Bynum from, Acts, xx. 28: Take heed therefore un- 
to yourselves, and to all the flock, over the which the Holy 
Ghost hath made you overseers, to feed the church of God, 
which he hath purchased with his own blood. 

1. The delegaies assembled for business, and chose 
Elder Samuel Moore moderator, Mark Bennett clerk, and 
John A. Atkinson, clerk assistant. Also chose brethren, 
Jonathan Ellis and Sherrod Tison, a committee of finance 
— to report on Saturday. 

2. Corresponding messengers, and ministers from cor- 
responding Associations were invited to sit with us. El- 
ders, R. McKee and R. Hensley from Country Line, B. 
Temple from Little River, P. Pucket from While Oak, 
and U. StalSings from the Kehukee, took seats. 

3. Letters from the churches were read, and their state 
made known as in the following table. 



53 


toltttb 


| 


b ^1 


O 


Churches and 


IS 


B *;'*• 




St S 


counties where- 


NAMES OF DELEGATES. ; 


Q«.( Q ' s 






2 £. 


in situated. 




a 

?■ 












Ob 2" 
i 


iAutrey'*s Creek 


RaleighReasons* JohnR. Moore, 














$ Cts 


Edgecombe, 


Stephen Wooten, 








3 




lKe" 


1 00 


Beaver Dam, 


Aretas Jones, Lofton Neather- 
















Lenoir, 


cut, Lewis Williams,* 












j 35 


1 50 


Black Creek, 


Arthur Barden,* James Barnes, 
















Wayne, 


William Bass, 












1 45 


J 50 


Galloway's, 


Alexander Brinkley, Noah Buck, 












i 




Pitt, 


John Haddock,* 












! 12 


1 30 


Hancock's, 


Frederick Haddock, John Smith, 












■ 




Pitt, 


Joel McGermon, 












14 


1 50 


Meadow, Benjamin Bynum, Aaron Joyner, 


















Greene,', James Beman, 














25 


1 50 


Memorial, jWright Bass, Elisha Holland, 














18 


1 00 


Wayne,i 


















JVauhunty, iSilas Pate,* Shadrach Pate, 


















Wayne, J Wright Taylor, 












2 


38 


1 50 


Pleasant Hill, Jacob Proctor, Frederic Proctor, 


















Edgecombe,! David Nolley, 








1 


1 




17 


1 ©0 


Pleasant Plai Joel Hines, Alfred Ellis, Wright 
















ns, Wayne, Smith, 




1 






1 




17 


i 05 


Red Banks. James Griffin, Laneir Griffin,* 


















Pitt,; George McGowns,* 














60 


1 50 


Sandy /?ottora,;Richard Rouse, Evans Whaley,* 








1 




o 


18 


1 00 


Lenoir,; 








1 








Tison's, Pitt, |Samuel Moore, Sherrod Tison, 


















Benjamin Briiey, 




I 




1 




14 


1 00 


Town Creek, 


Thomas Dupree,*MarkBennett, 


















Edgecombe, 


Moses Baker, 


1 








2 


f 2 


66 


1 50 


Union. 


Matthew Whitehead, Augustin 


















Edgecombe, 


Whitehead, Daniel Land, 






2 






! 2 


57 


1 50 


White Oak, 


Ichabod Moore, Jonathan Ellis* 












; 






Edgecombe, 


Solomon Barnes, 


2 


2 








1 


24 


1 00 


JVote. Absentees are marked thus *. 


3 


4 


2 


5 


7 


10 


506 


20 55 



4 Petitionary letters were enquired for. One from the 
church at Hancock's, and one from the church at Gallo- 
way's, both of Pitt county, were presented; and, upon ex- 
amination, being considered sound in the faith, they were 
in order, and entered upon the table. 

5. Letters of correspondence and intelligence from cor- 
responding Associations were inquired for. A letter and 
file of minutes from the White Oak, and also from the 
Little River, and minutes and verbal intelligence from the 
Country Line and Abbot's Creek Union, were cordially 
received by their respective messengers. 

G, The Circular letter was called for, handed in, and 
referred to a committee, consisting of Elders, Bynum, 
Temple, Swaim and Atkinson — to report on Saturday. 

7. Appointed messengers to sister Associations: breth- 
ren, I. Moore, J. Griffin and Bennett, to Kehukee; J. 



$ 

Griffin, I. Moore, Bynum, and Bass, to Little River; At- 
kinson, Bynum, J. Gnffirt and J. Ellis, to Country Line and 
Abbot's Creek Union; Bynum and J. Griffin, to White Oak. 
Adjourned to Saturday, 10 o'clock, A. M. 

SATURDAY, Oct 21st. 

8. The invitation to ministers and corresponding mes- 
sengers was repeated — Elder Lawrence, messenger from 
Kehukee, presented a letter and file of minutes from that 
body, and took his seat with us: Also, Elders Ilyman and 
Daniel took seats. 

9. The committee to whom was referred the Circular 
letter reported: that th^y had examined it, and, with a few 
corrections, recommended it to the consideration of the 
Association, and also its adoption. It was read, ordered 
to be corrected by the Clerk, and annexed to our minutes. 

10. The list was called, and absentees noted. 

11. The Constitution and rules of decorum were read. 

12. Elected Elders, Lawrence, Hyman and Temple, to 
preach on Sunday, worship to begin at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

13. The committee of finance reported: 

Balance remaining in the treasury last year, 
Contributions at this Association, - 

Paid for printing minutes last year, 
Paid Clerk for services, - - 

Gave Elder Griffin for attending Country Line and Ab- 
bot's Creek Union Associations, - 

Now in the treasury, - - - - $9 38 

October 21st, 1837\ 8HERROD TISON, l n 

JONATHAN ELLIS,5 Com ' 

14. Appointed our next meeting to be with the church 
at Beaver Dam, Lenoir county, to begin Friday before 
4th Sunday in October, 1838 — brother Bennett to preach 
the introductory sermon; or brother I. Moore, in case the 
farmer fail — worship to begin at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

15. Appointed M, Bennett to prepare these minutes for 
press, to have 400 copies printed and distributed as for- 
merly, and to record one copy on the Association book. 

16. The minutes were read and subscribed by the Mod- 
erator and Clerk. 

Adjourned to time and place above named. 

SUNDAY, Oct. 22nd. 

Elder Temple preached from Acts xvi. 17, The same 
followed Paul and us, and cried, saying, These men are 
the servants of the most high God, which shew unto us the 
way of salvation. Elder Lawrence followed, and preach- 



- • 


$16 83 
20 55 


10 00 
10 00 

8 00 


$37 38 
9ft on 



I 

ed from the Song of Solomon, iv. 12. A garden enclosed 
is my sister, my spouse; a spring shut up, a fountain 
sealed. Elder Hyman prayed and dismissed the people. 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 

The Ministers and Messengers composing the Contentnea Baptist 
Association, now sitting at Old Town Creek meeting house, Edge- 
combe county, N. C. the 20, 21 and 22 days of October, 1S37, to the 
several churches they represent, send you this, agreeably to a long 
standing custom with us, as our annual epistle, in which we shall at- 
tempt to call your attention to some of the important truths which 
God in his 2;reat goodness has seen fit to reveal by his Holy Spirit in 
his word, and in the hearts of us (as we do hope) his dear children. 

Very dear Brethren: There have been in almost all ages of the 
world, men who by profession have denied the existence of God, 
and the immortality of the soul; teaching that happiness alone con- 
sists in doing what man thinks to be right, agreeabty to the dictates 
of common sense with the highest cultivation of the mind by the aid 
of human wisdom. To such we would say In the language of Paul, 
Romans, 1. 20: For the invisible things of him, from the creation of 
the world, are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are 
made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without 
excuse. And it really does appear to us while contemplating the 
wonderful works of nature, Irnit there could not be any rational and 
intelligent being so depraved that he conld lay his band on his breast, 
whilst gazing on the same, and say in his heart, there is no God;- — 
that we and all nature exist some how or other by mere chance,— 
that nature caused itself, — that happiness is alone here, — that we 
shall not exist after death, — that there is no judgment to come of the 
just and the unjust, no judgment seat of Christ where we are all to 
appear, and answer for the works or deeds done in the body, whe- 
ther they be good or whether they be bad. Yet it is said in the 
scriptures, "The fool hath said in his heart, there is no God." Not- 
withstanding there are men with such opinions, we can rejoice that 
God has never left himself without a witness, and to you, dear breth- 
ren, we can say in the language of holy writ, (ii. Peter, 1. 19:) We 
have also a more sure word of prophecy, whereunto ye do well that 
ye take heed: for the prophecy came not of old time, by the will of 
man, but holy men spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost. 

And there have been and still are men that deny the nativity of 
our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, although the scripture says, 
"The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee and the power of the high- 
est shall overshadow thee, therefore also that holy thing which shall 
be born of thee shall be called the Son of God." Likewise there 
are still, as have been before, men that profess a universal salvation — 
that all will finally be happy in eternity, the scripture to the con- 
trary notwithstanding. See Mark, 3. 89, and this passage: "And 
many of them that sleep in the dust of the earth, shall awake, some 
to everlasting life and some to everlasting shame and contempt. 
As well as many other scriptures, if we had space to quote them. 



" v 



Still we have great cause to rejoice in the Rock of our Salvation, and 
to thank and adore him for one more privilege of meeting together 
in this our Association, in the land of liberty, and worshipping him 
in the way that seems right to us, consistent with his word. 

We think it fit to attend first, to some of the important truths con- 
tained in the word of God. It is declared in the scriptures of the 
Old and New Testaments, which we do believe to be the word of 
God, that in the beginning God created the heavens and the earth; 
that he created the beasts of the field, fowls of the air, fish of the sea, 
and also man. So God created man in his own image, in the image 
of God created he him, male and female created he them. Here we 
see our origin, let the infidel say what he may. We also find that 
the creator gave the creature a rule by which he was to be governed, 
or as it is better understood, a law. This law is manilested by the 
tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Thou shalt not eat of it; for 
in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die. What fol- 
lows! we find that man disobeyed, that he did eat of the forbidden 
fruit; therefore the penalty annexed to the transgression-, which was 
death, must certainly follow. Of this death it may be considered, 
that, our first parents did die to that created slate in which they stood 
before the transgression; that by the fall they brought condemnation 
on themselves and their posterity, and death of the body and soul, 
unless made alive through the efficacy of Christ's atonement. This 
is why it is said, by one man came sin, and death by sin, so death 
hath passed upon all, for all have sinned; and lurther why it is said, sin 
is the transgression of the law; for by the law is the knowledge of sin, 
so Paul says to the Romans. This is what is understood by a state 
of condemnation, born in sin: "For in sin did my mother conceive me. 
I was shapen in sin, and brought forth in iniquity," says one of old. 
And Job says, How can a clean thing come out of an unclean? 

These are some of the truths contained in the word of God, relating 
to man's fall and his present state by nature. Notwithstanding so 
much that has been and still is said to the contrary by those that try 
to place mankind, through the death and sufferings of Christ, where 
he was before the fall; that is, that Christ by his death has done 
away original sin, by his atonement has made salvation possible for 
all mankind, that man is now condemned alone for actual sin, con- 
demned alone for not believing in Jesus Christ! How does this agree 
with the word of truth? which declares that by man came sin, by th-e 
disobedience of one many were made sinners — not by the disobedi- 
ence of many. And again, was Adam condemned for not believing 
in Jesus Christ, or for transgressing God's law? What say you? 
Not being believers in Christ proves that we are in a state of con- 
demnation. Christ came not into the world to condemn the world; 
it was already condemned. And again, if not sinners, how can, or 
how do they die? For death is the punishment for sin. And again, 
if not sinners, how are they saved by Christ? For he came to save 
sinners, not the righteous. And again, if they are cleansed from 
sin, it must be by an application of the blood of Christ. Therefore, 
they cannot ever after come into condemnation; if they do, Christ's 
blood avails them nothing If once holy, they must remain ever 
holy; for his seed remaineth in them. The word of truth and daily 
experience prove the saints' everlasting holiness: for the blood of Je- 



6 

sus Christ his Son cleanses from all sin. Do we not see the earnai 
heart is enmity itself to God, not subject to the law of God, neither 
can be? 

We would direct your minds, brethren, to the time soon after the 
fall when, it is said, the seed of the woman shall bruise the serpent's 
head. Here we have the first promise of a Saviour. Also see John, 
first chapter: In the beginning was the word, and the word was with 
God, and the word was God: and the word was made flesh and 
dwelt among us. In the first of these passages, Christ is revealed; 
in the second, made manifest in the flesh. Psalms, 40. 7: So I came, 
in the volume of the. book it is written of me. And again, in the 
fulness of the time God sent his Son info the world. He came un- 
der the law to redeem them that were under the law. And here let 
us again examine the word of truth, where we will see plainly mani- 
fested, in the two first children that were born, the effect of faith 
with works, and of works without faith, which is still manifest to 
this day in the seed of the woman and the seed of the serpent. Let 
us endeavor to travel on in the good old way, the way of truth, stop- 
ping at here and there a place and taking a look at the directions. 

See the effect of faith in old Enoch: for he walked with God and 
he was not, for God took him. Let us as much as in us lies, walk 
Jikewise. See Noah: and Noah found grace in the eyes of the 
Lord, was a just man. And see at the same timeMhe wickedness of 
man in general. For God says, "Behold I will destrow them with 
the earth, saith the Lord:" For what? Was it not for their wick- 
edness? But to Noah, a just man, he saith, "make thee an ark." 
And when it was completed after the pattern which God gave him, 
the Lord said unto Noah, come thou and all thy house into the ark. 
It does not say, as some say nowadays, lake any body with you; 
the ark is large enough for all, if they would come. But we find it 
to the contrary. The call was to Noah and all his house, a definite 
number. No conditions are named. And do you not think that 
Noah and his house entered willingly? But what made the beasts, 
fowls of the air, and creeping things come in? Was it of their own 
free will and accord? or was it of the power of God? What say you? 
We think the latter. The same power that brought Us into the spi- 
ritual ark, Christ. We believe according to the working of his 
mighty power. * 

Let us go on to Abram, afterwards Abraham, and see the dealing 
of God with him. Was Abram the cause of God's calling him to 
get out of the land of his fathers to a land which God promised to 
him and his seed? Was it not God working after the council of his 
own will, as saying I have loved thee with an everlasting love, 
therefore with loving kindness have I drawn thee. We see when 
God called Abram, he heard, and believed too; and now when God 
calls a sinner, he makes him hear, arid live. Abraham believed God 
and it was accounted unto him for righteousness. Will you say, Abra- 
ham was justified by works? We say not. For if he was, he hath 
whereof to glory, but not before God; for Paul says, to him that 
worketh is the reward not reckoned of g r ace, but of debt. So we 
see that he could not be justified by works, in the sight of God as a 
sinner, but justified in believing God as a righteous act. And here 
we see the effectual call proved. A word here is sufficient. Jere- 



7 

miah, 6. 16. Read this chapter, and see if you can find any thing 
(hat agrees with the present times. Then saith the Lord, stand ye 
in the ways, and see; and ask for the old paths, where is the good 
way, and walk therein; and ye shnll find rest to your souls. But 
they said, we will not hearken. What was the consequence? Exa- 
mine for yourselves. 

We must for the present pass by many important places, omitting 
to notice Isaac, Rebecca, and others. See God's people carried loE- 
gypt, notwithstanding God's promise to Abraham of the promised 
land. And come on to God's delivering them by Moses. Here, we 
have a most striking display of God's power, in which we find some- 
thing to help the poor minister of God on. See the wonderful pre- 
servation of Moses. And when God's time came to deliver his peo- 
ple, he said, I have seen, 1 have seen the affliction of my people, and 
am come down to deliver them. No conditions; he had come down 
to deliver them, and Moses was his choice by which to effect it. 
Hear Moses' language: Who am I, ihat I should go unto Pharaoh? 
God said, certainly I will be with thee; and say to them, I AM 
hath sent me unto you. Did any thing prevent God's effecting his 
purpose? We are told in these times, they might, or could have 
come out if they would. But to the contrary, we find them under 
hard masters, and. Pharaoh at the head, who would not let them come 
out. See the same situation now of sinners: they are taken captive of 
the devil at his will. And again, Ye are of your father the devil, 
and the lusts of your father ye will do. So it would seem to be a 
bad chance for them to get out, unless by the power of God. When 
God called Moses to the work, what did Moses say? what some do 
now-a-days, pay me so much, or first send me to a theological school, 
that I may be taught what to say, and then I will go? We think 
not. Moses seems fully sensible of his inability for the work, and 
asks of God what to tell them. Now what was the effecl? Did he 
say, I will go and stay as long as they will give me $20 or $40 per 
month? We think not. He went, and Aaron with him. And 
God delivered his people out of the hands of their enemies. So he 
does yet, and will continue to t\o so. Was all the host of Pharaoh 
delivered with them? Say no: for if they had been, there would not 
have been any to follow after and pursue them; nor a mixed multi- 
tude to be with them. Sec another display of the power of God at 
the Re* Sea: the sea before, the host of Pharaoh behinc!! What was 
to be done? Destruction to all human appearance was certain. 
What does Moses say? Does he say all hope is gone; prepare for 
death! No such thing falls from the man of Goo'. Hear him saying, 
stand still and see the salvation of God. The sea divided 
— the Israelites pass through dry shod — Pharaoh's host attempt to 
follow, but are drowned. God is always w'ith his people; but many 
times they cannot see in what way, or how they are to be deliv- 
ered. 

Brethren, did you ever experience any thing like t his? If so, you 
have great reason to rejoice, as the children oi Israel' did. But re- 
member they had a wilderness to pass through, as you have; a^id re- 
member how soon and how often Ihey forgot their God by forsaking 
his law, and following other gods; by wbich'they brought sore judg- 
ments on themselves: which certainly will be our rase if we wa!i> in 



8 

tike forbidden paths. See how God displayed his power wilh Josh- 
ua, in taking possession of the promised land. 

We must hasten. We have a long journey before us, beset with 
snares and traps, still we have a prize in view, which will nut admit 
of cfelay. Next we would call your attention to the prophets, which 
God. raised up to instruct his people, and to warn them. Yet not- 
witstanding all we see, how ollen they strayed from the right way, 
and thereby brought distress on themselves. And, brethren, can we 
escape if we do the like? Let us examine the directions and endea- 
vor to keep in the way. But in all these limes we see God had 
some faithful ones to instruct and warn his people. And what should 
we do these cold and trying times, if it was not for a few faithful 
ones that stand firm on the same foundation of the prophets of oid, 
-Jfesus Christ and his apostles! 

We will pass on to the time God sees fit to speak to the world by 
his Son Jesus Christ. In the fulness of the time, Jesus Christ, God 
manifest in the flesh, makes his appearance in the world, — the long- 
looked for Saviour. What was the then state of the world? Was 
every body faithful, ready to receive him as the Christ; or were they 
mostly wicked, idol worshippers? Alas, even the Jews, that boast- 
ed of being Moses's disciples, seem only to have had a form of god- 
liness, but denying the power thereof; as Paul proves. Neverthe- 
less, God's time had come for Christ to come in the flesh. For Pe- 
ter proves it, when he says, (speaking of Christ,) "Him being deliv- 
ered by the determinate council and foreknowledge of God." And 
if delivered according to his council, certainly he came according to 
the same. For God sent his Son into the world; and he could not 
send him without first determining to do so. Now there was a cause 
for God sending his Son, and a purpose to be effected by it. The 
cause was Ged's eternal love; the purpose was man's salvation. 
The law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus 
Christ. It is one thing to be justified by the law, and another to be 
justified by Jesus Christ. For if there had been a law that could 
have given life, then verily righteousness would have come by the 
law. Then Christ would have died in vain. But Christ is the end 
of the law for righteousness unto every one that believeth. There- 
fore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our 
Lord Jesus Christ. 

Let us stop, for a moment, to contemplate the advent of our Lord 
and Saviour Jesus Christ into this woi Id, to the few and faithful that 
were looking for him agreeable to the prophecies, and contrast it 
with the feelings of those self righteous pharisees and idol worship- 
pers, who were expecting righteousness by the law. Let us have it 
in the language of the angel sent for that purpose: Fear not, for be- 
hold I bring you good tidings of great joy which shall be to all peo- 
ple. For unto you is horn this day, in the city of David, a Saviour 
which is Christ the Lord. A Saviour! what a precious word that is, 
to a poor, lost, trembling sinner, that sees no way for his escape, — 
condemned and justly so, — a sinner against heaven and in his own 
sight, —lost and undone for ever- We say how often have these 
words'been balm to his sin sick soul, and good tidings of great joy; 
a Saviour, able and willing to save; a Saviour, able to save his peo- 
ple from their sins. His people. Now here arises an inquiry, who 



9 

are his people? Some will tell us that the people here contemplated 
are all and every hody that may, if they will believe; they may and 
can be saved. But we do not believe so; for the text does not say 
so. It says, he shall, in the positive, save his people from their sins, 
Again, it is said, they are his people when they believe. The text 
don't read so; it says, he shall save his people. We will admit all 
are his people by creation and preservation. Further it is contend- 
ed by some, that all are his by4redemption: which we cannot admit. 
For if so, then he must save all; or he cannot see the travel of his 
soul and be satisfied — which would lead to an universal salvation, to 
which we cannot give our assent; as the word of truth is so plain on 
the point. Well then, what are we to understand the people contem- 
plated in the text? We believe they are the same people contempla- 
ted in the passage where it is said, God was in Christ reconciling *he 
world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unlo them. We 
believe Jt to be the same people, whose sins he bore in his own hody 
on die tree. We believe it to be the same people mentioned in Eph- 
esosians: According as he hath chosen us in him before the founda- 
tion of the world, that we should be holy, and without blame before 
him in love. Not chosen, as some say, because they were holy, but 
we say because they were unholy, and that they might be made ho- 
ly; which agrees with the text that says, not by works of righteous- 
ness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved u^, by 
the washing of regeneration and the renewing of the Holy Ghost. 
We believe it to be the same people given to him in covenant, which 
is proven by many scriptures. See Hebrews, for one: Through the 
blood of the everlasting covenant. We believe them to be the same 
people given to him by the Father: For thine they were, and thou 
gavest them me. Now if he has bargained for them, and paid the 
price, (for it is said, bought with a price, redeemed not with corrup- 
tible things as silver and gold, but his own precious blood;) and if 
he has all power in heaven and in earth, do you not think, breth- 
ren, he will save his people from their sins? To conclude this part: 
we say, Christ has paid the debt, died in the stead of his people; and 
now it only remains for them to he brought to a knowledge of the 
same to be saved from their sins, born again, brought into the ark of 
safety, brought into the promised laud, saved from condemnation, 
saved from the power and dominion of sin, saved from the love of it, 
killed to the love of it; for how can they that are dead to sin, live 
any longer in it. 

We now speak of the effect of the Holy Ghost upon the hearts of 
sinners. God says, behold the days come, when ] will make a new 
covenant with the house of Israel, and with the house of Judah; not 
according to the one made with their fathers when they were bro't 
out of the land of Egypt. But it is after this way: I wllj put my 
law in their mind, aud write them in their hearts; and I will be to 
them a God, and they shall be my people. And again, the hour is 
coming, and how is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son 
of God, and they that hear shall live. We believe this is (he office 
or work of the Holy Spirit. For it is said, as many as are lead by 
the Spirit of God, they are the sons of God. And again, born of 
the Spirit. And now, brethren, for the evidences in your own 
breast. Have you ever felt any of the operations of the Holy Spirit 



10 



fn your own souls? Such as, being born again, born of the Spirit, 
dead to sin, striving against sin, warring against it? Have you died 
to it, and been made alive to holiness; and felt love to God; and love 
to sainis? For love is the fulfilment of the law; and an evidence 
that you have passed from death unto life, and have the witness in 
your own heart. If so, you are an heir of God and a joint heir with 
Jesus Christ; kept by the power of Qod through faith unto salva- 
tion. And if God be for you, who can be against you? Is not this 
enough? We think we hear some of you saying, I once thought I 
fe.lt and knew something of these things; but now it seems to be all 
gone: it is so dead and cold with me. Suppose you were to let us 
make some enquiry of you. Perhaps you are like Israel of old, 
strayed from the covenant, from the right way; and too much in 
love with the things of the world. Is this world a friend to us, "to 
help us on to God?" you must say not. Perhaps you may feel and 
say, I can hardly contain myself reading a chapter in the good book, 
rather read almost any thing else. I find I can read, or take much 
more time in reading newspapers, or other works of the day, than 
the scriptures of truth. It might be said of these, that it is well 
enough at times; but be sure not to neglect the more important mat- 
ter. Search the scriptures, for in them ye think ye have eternal life 
and they are they that testify of me. Brethren in the ministry, is 
this the case with any of you? Is there any neglect in reading the 
word of God? If so, no wonder that you are often so much at a loss 
for a text to prove the doctrine you are striving to maintain; not be- 
cause there is not a text to prove it, but because you cannot recollect 
it. But perhaps the poor preacher will say, this is not the worst. 
It seems I have no life even to sing, or hardly return God thanks 
for the blessings which I daily enjoy, have no spirit of prayer; yea, 
and when it comes time to go to preaching, it seems that from some 
cause I hardly want to go; and if I go, it seems that I can't preach, 
and that every body wants me to quit; and in fact it seems that I 
had as well quit. Brethren in the ministry, remember Moses. God 
told him to go. And go you must, if God has sent you. Examine 
the old way spoken of, and see if you cannot find some circumstance 
or case that suits yours. Perhaps you have gone in forbidden paths, 
lusting after the things of the world too much. 

Brethren? one and all, we find we are swelling this epistle too far, 
and must come to a close. We, of this Contentnea Association, pro- 
fess to be a people taught of the Lord. If so, the scripture will re- 
cognize us as Christians. The disciples were first called Christians 
at Antioch. We shall examine the word Christian in a two-fold 
sense: first, the term, Christian, is applied generally, to all those na- 
tions and people that profess Christ. Secondly, and as we would be 
understood to mean, to those, and those alone, that are born again, 
born of the Spirit of God; those that walk in newness of life, that 
are really and truly believers in Jesus Christ, that are dead to sin. 
These we consider and no others are Christians and fit subjects for 
baptism, and that by immersion; and for members of Christ's church 
here on earth. Such we consider were the first Christians contem- 
plated in the text. 

Now, brethren, let us see what were their characters. We find 
them, Chri$t-like } always doing good; and although in the world, 



11 

the world possessing but little of them. See them as ministers of 
Christ, earnestly contending for his truth even to death. Hear the 
Saviour to Peter: Feed my lambs — feed my sheep. Hear Paul, 
Acts, 20. 21 — -28: I go bound in the spirit to Jerusalem, not know- 
ing the things that shall befal me there. And to the brethren in the 
ministry: Take heed therefore unto yourselves, and to all the flock, 
over the which the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers, to feed the 
church of God, which he hath purchased with his own blood. Mark 
that, brethren, the Holy Ghost, not men, or boards of men, but the 
Holy Ghost hath made you overseers; to feed the church of God. If 
these were the only preachers among us, do you not think we should 
be better off. Hear Paul further in this same chapter: Knowing 
this, that after my departure shall grievous wolves enter in among 
you, not sparing the flock. Of these wolves, Christ also warns us to 
beware. And now, brethren of the Contentnea Association, we by 
profession have protested, as we think, against the work of these 
wolves; for we think we have seen their tracks, notwithstanding they 
have the sheepskin on; and have felt some of the effects of their 
teeth. The church in the scriptures is compared to many things — a 
woman, a garden, a city, and many others, among which sheep is 
one. See Christ to Peter, feed my sheep. Contemplate for a mo- 
ment the difference in sheep and wolves. What a striking difference. 
In the character of sheep, we would be glad to comfort you a little 
before we leave you; and in doing so, what can we say more and 
better for your consolation, than to refer you to Christ's own words : 
See John 10: I am the good shepherd, the good shepherd giveth 
his life for the sheep. Contrast this with the hireling. See the differ- 
ence. The hireling fleeth, because he is an hireling, and careih not 
for the sheep. Christ : I am the good shepherd, and know my sheep, 
and am known of mine. Contemplate for a moment what we once 
were, and what we hope we now are. Once dead in trespasses and 
in sin, now dead to sin : Once out of the fold, now received into the 
fold: once enemies to God, now friends to God : once unreconciled 
to God, now reconciled to him by the death of his Son. See the 
everlasting love of God. I have loved thee with an everlasting love, 
therefore with loving kindness have I drawn thee. God is love; we 
love him, God, because he first loved us. God so loved the world, 
that he gave his only begotten Son; Christ so loved sinners, that he 
gave himself — he gave himself for us, that he might purify unto him- 
self a peculiar people, zealous of good works. See the love of Christ, 
he that was rich became poor, that we through his poverty might be 
rich. John says, love one another. Brethren, we ought to love one 
another, and Christians under a right exercise of faith, do love one 
another. Once more, the character and nature of sheep: they are harm- 
less, inoffensive animals, feeding on green pastures in the spring and 
summer, have a natural disposition to be together, but are subject to 
many diseases; often get their fleece torn with briers, thorns; are 
easily scattered by wolves and dogs, and often killed; and very often 
get so much frightened, that they run from the shepherd himself; but 
in due time, by right management, they get back again. We notice 
that sheep chew the cud. We often see them, after feeding on the 



12 

pasture for a while, lying under the shade apparently happy, were 
it not for the flies, chewing the cud, or food again, in the winter 
we see them feeding on buds, and the old dead straw of the pas- 
ture; and when they can get it, on grain from the hand of the shep- 
herd. So Christians like to be together, unless torn apart by wolves 
and dogs, they in spiritual springs feed on green pastures, heaveuly 
frames, and on the sincere milli of the world, but are often beset with 
difficulties, torn with briers; and evil thoughts like flies, when they are 
or meditating on a good sermon which they have heard or are hearing; 
meditating on the dealings of God with their souls. But in a spiritual 
winter, all seems cold and lifeless with l hem; if they walk over the 
pasture and attempt to teed thereon, it all seems as dry straw; no sub- 
stance 1 in it. But when they can shelter under some of the precious 
promises, get a grain or so from the shepherd of the bread of life, that 
came down from God, that giveth life to the church, they revive a lit- 
tle. Now if we have an evidence that we are sheep, let us endea- 
vour to live as such, be always ready to give a reason >>f the 
hope that is in us; endeavouring to be like our blessed Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ, as much as we can; for we are a city set upon 
a hill that cannot be hid. Let us endeavor to keep the unity of the 
spirit in the bond of peace. Let us always, as much as in us lies, 
abound in the work of the Lord, showing our faith by our works; and 
with {he words of Paul we for the present leave you: And now, 
brethren, we commend you to God, and to the word of his grace; 
which is able to build you up, and to give you an inheritance among 
a!! them which are sanctified. Farewell. 



Tardoro' Press 



- 






■INCHES OF UtS EIGHTH AhJSSMa session of 

Contentuea Baptist Association, 

Held at Beaver Bam, Lenoir County, 26, 27, 2S, Oct. 1838. 

FRIDAY, Oct. 26. 

The Introductory Sermon was delivered by Mark Bennett, from i Cor, 
xv. 55, 56, 57: O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy vic- 
tory? The sting of death is sin, and the strength of sin is the law. But 
thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory thro' onr Lord Jesus Christ. 

The delegates assembled for business, and chose Elder Thomas Du- 
pree Moderator, Mark Bennett Clerk, and brethren S. Tison and A. 
Jones, a committee of finance. 

Corresponding messengers and ministers from corresponding Associa- 
tions were invited to sit with us. Elder S.I. Chandler and brother Eli- 
jah O'Bryan from Country Line, bearing a file of their minutes; brethren 
L. Hardison and P. Pucket from the White Oak, bringing minutes; 
brethren John Joiner and Henry Hamilton from Little River, with min- 
utes; brother 11. E. Rieves from Kehukee, with minutes, came forward 
and took seats. 

1. Letters from the churches were read, in which they reported their 
condition as follows: 



Churches and Counties 
wherein situated. 



Jhitrey's Creek, Edgecombe, 
Beaver Dam,, Lenoir, 
Black Creek, Wayne^ 
Galloway' 's, Pitt, 
Hancock's, Pitt* 
Meadow, Greene, 
Memorial, Wayne, 
Nauhunty, W ayne, 
Pleasant Hill. Edgecombe, 
Pleasant Plains, Wayne, 
Red Banks, Pitt, 
Sandy Bottom, Lenoir, 
Tison\<>, Pitt, 
Town Creek, Edgecombe, 
Union, Edgecombe, 
White Oak, Edgecombe, 



NAMES OF DELEGATES, 



Amansel Crisp, John R. Moore S. Wooten, 
! Aretas .lones, L. Neathercut, L. Williams, 
Not represented, 

Noah Buck, Samuel C orb in,* Ji Ftaddock 
Johu Smith, Jas. Wilson,* Enoch Dudley* 
Benj. Bynum, Josi Bynum, Aafon Joiner 
Not represented. 

Miles Radford, Shadrach Pate, Silas Pate, 
Jacob Proctor, Fred. Proctor, S. Bras well, 
Joel Hines, Wright Smith, Alfred Ellis, 
James Griffin, Ci Nelson,* G. McGown, 
Richard Rouse, - 

Sam'l Moore, Sh. Tison, L. P. Beardsley, 
Thb's-. Dupree, J. C, Knight, M. Bennett, 
M, Whitehead,* Jona. Bailey, D. Land,* 
J, B. Woodard,* J. Ellis,* Icha'd Moore, 

*Not present. 



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2. Petitionary letters were enquired for, 

3. Correspondence from sister Associations was called for. Letters from 
iheWhiteOak & LittleRiver Associations were received by their messengers. 

4. The Circular Letter was called for, and referred to a committee, 
consisting of Elders Stephen I. Chandler, Thomas Dupree, and Ichabod 
Moore; and agreed that they and the committee of finance make their re- 
ports to-morrow. 

5. Read the Constitution and Rules of Decorum. 

6. Appointed messengers to corresponding Associations: M. Bennett 
and James Griffin to Country Line and Abbot's Creek Union; Ichabod 
Moore and Bhadrach Pate to Little River; T. Dupree, 8. Ti«on. and 



% 
Mark Bennett, to Kehukee; Alfred Ellis and James Griffin to White 
Oak, Associations; and with them 40 copies minutes to Kehukee; 20 to 
Abbot's Creek; 20 to Country Line; 20 to Little River; 15 to White Oak. 

7. Agreed that we appoint brethren Dupree, I. Moore, and Bennett, to. 
visit Toisnot church and enquire of her the reason of her failing to repre- 
sent herself the last three years, and that we tender her 20 copies of 
our Minutes: and that said brethren report to our next session. 

Adjourned by prayer, to Saturday 10 o'clock. 

SATURDAY, Oct. 27. 
Met according to adjournment, and opened by prayer. 

8. The committee on the Circular Letter reported: That they approve 
the Circular, and recommend it to the consideration of the Association. 
It was read, and ordered to be attached to these Minutes; also ordered^ 
that our Constitution and Rules of Decorum be annexed thereto. 

9. The commiUee of finance reported as follows: 
The bdance remaining in the Treasury last year was 
Contributions at this Association, 

Paid for Printing the Minutes last year, 
Paid Clerk for his services, - 

Now in the Treasury, - 

October 23d, 1S3S. SHERROD TISON, , 

ARETAS JONES, \ Com ' 

10. The list was called, and absentees marked. 

Elected Eiders Dupree and S. 1. Chandler to preach on Sunday, wor- 
ship to begin at 10i o'clock, A. M. 

11. Appointed our next meeting to be held with the church at Red 
Banks, Fitt county, to commence Friday before the fourth Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1839. 1 Eider Thomas Dupree to preach the Introductory Sermon, or El- 
der Ichabod Moore, if he should fail: worship to begin at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

12. Appointed M. Bennett to prepare the minutes for the press, to have 
400 copies printed, and distributed as heretofore, and record one copy on 
the Association book. 

13. Ilequested Elder James Griffin to prepare a Circular Letter to be 
attached to our next year's minutes. 

- 14. The minutes were read and subscribed by the Moderator and Clerk. 
Adjourned to the time and place above named. 

Makk Bennett, Clerk. THOMAS DUPREE, Mod'r. 

CIRCULAR LETTER. 



- 


$9 38 


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$33 SS 


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'I he saints of God by hope, composing 
the eighthannn.nl session of theContentnea 
Baptist Association, to the churches of that 
body . and to all them that have obtained like 
precious faith with us through the righteous- 
ness of God and our Saviour Jesus Christ: 
Grace aria" peace be multiplied unto you 
through the knowledge of God, and of Je- 
sus our Lord. 
^ We are bound to give thanks always to 
God for you, brethren beloved of the Lord; 



fication of the Spirit and belief of the truth, 
but likewise because he hath spared your 
lives, and has not removed your candle- 
si icks out of their places; and has granted 
unto us to hear of your peace with each oth- 
er, and, amidst the many winds of doctrine, 
and sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, 
that you arc enabled to stand fast in one spi- 
rit, with one mind, striving together lor the 
faith of the gospel. And we thank God that 
he has brought a number of us to one more 
not only because God hath from the begin- mutual sight, which has refreshed and -com- 
aing chosen you to salvation through sancti- forted our spirits ; and caused us to sit togeth- 



3 



e,r in tranquility and brotherly love. And believe they consist chiefly, if not altogeth- 



for your furtherance and joy of faith, we 
will lay before you a few thoughts on the 
subject of 

ANTINOMIANISM. 



er, in giving meat to the hungry, drink to 
the thirsty, shelter to the stronger, and 
clothing to the naked, and to visit and min- 
ister to the sick and the prisoner. (Matt. 



As we are not certain that the sense of xxv. 35 — 46:) These arc enjoined upon all 
this term has remained fixed and settled men in thai command, Thou shalt love 
.since the time of Agricola, we deem it ne- thy neighbor as thyself. If the antinomi- 
eessary to use some care in defining it. The ans intended to say that* it was not indis- 
simplest meaning of antinumian, is, one pensable for these, or any other good works, 

so called, to pr -cede salvation, and that, 
too, as the means of salvation or grace, 
they were surely right. For, by the deeds 
of the law there shall no flesh be justified : 
A man is justified by faith without the 

til. 



who is o])nos o d to law. fn a religious 
sense, its true import is, one who is oppo- 
sed to the law of God. When used in ei- 
ther of these senses, it at once attaches odi- 
um to the person to whom it is applied. It 

bespaks the citizen to be selfish, turbulent, deeds of the law. (Rom. iii. 20 — 28:) 
and an enemy to good order and to men; and But if they meant to say that these works 
denotes the professor of Christianity to be do not accompany salvation, as the product 
destitute of reverence for the divine charac- of grace or faith, and that invariably, they 

were mistaken Come, ye blessed of my 
Father, inherit the kingdom, &c, For I 



tor, and more daringly wicked than an optm 
infidel. A more extended signification, 



me : I was in prison, and ye came unto 
me. Inasmuch as ye have done it 



and the general acceptation of the term, is was hungry, and ye gave me meat : I was 

one who denies that the law of God, o?\ thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a 

Moral Law, is in force, and obligatory : stranrger, and ye took me in : Naked, and 

on men under the gospel dispensation It ye clothed me : I was sick, and ye visited 

is defined by Charles Buck: one who 

maintains that the law is of no use, or j 

obligation under the gospel dispensa-i unto one of the least of these my brethren, 

Hon, or who holds doctrines that clearly j ye have done it unto me. But 

supersede the necessity of good works, now being made free from sin, and be- 
Buck continues : Some of them [antino- come servants to God, ye have your fruit 
means'] it is said, maintained, that if, unto holiness, and the em] everlasting life. 
they should commit any kind of sin, it (Matt. xxv. 35, 36,40: Rom. vi. 22:) If 
mould do them no hurl, nor in the least by saying, the "committing of any kind of 
affect their eternal state; and that it is! sin would do them no hurt, nor in the least 
one of the characters of the elect that they \ affect their eternal state, they simply meant 
cannot do any thing displeasing to God. j that, the soul of the christian will not be, 
Theol. Diet. Art. Antinomiaus. 

If we are not mistaken, the term has of late 
been used improperly, and almost without ( elect can do nothing displeasing to God, 
signification, as when it is applied to those j they on I v mean that, the soul partakes not 
whoviewthemissionarveffortsoflhepresent i at all of the guilt of the outward man, then 
age as being unscriptural and vainglorious, j is no fault to be found with them on this 
The account given by Buck appears not ' point. But if they would be understood 
to be in the words of Agricola, nor of those; that, the soul might possibly sin wilfully, 
identified with him. but in the Lmguage of or contract guilt from the sins of the flesh, 
those who denied their doctrine; gnd it can- ! or even feel theworkings of sin in the flesh, 
not be fully relied upon as a true copy of I and not be grieved orany otherwise disturb- 
their creed, inasmuch as it is difficult for ; ed or injured thereby, but stand clear before 
one sect or denomination to describe the God, their doctrine was condemnable. But 



in the general judgment, accountable for 
the sins of the flesh; and by saying th< 



faith of another without some coloring or 
slight inaccuracy. The notions ascribed 
to them, however, are certainly in our 
opinion, if we understand them, unsupport- 
ed by the scriptures. If by the law, is 
meant, the moral law, and if they intend- 
ed to say that, this was no longer binding 
on saints or sinners after the gospel age 
commenced, they ran right foul of the 



that the mind or soul cannot sin, nor contract 
guilt from the sinning of the flesh, am 1 , 
consequently, under all possible circumstan- 
ces, cannot displease God, is a truth abun- 
dantly, set forth in the scriptures; and af- 
fords the only ground upon which the final 
perseverance of the saints, or even the pos- 
sible salvation of any soul can be built. 
Upon the whole, if either good works, 
doctrine of the apostles. As it regards 1 which consist chiefly, or altogether, in acts 
"ood works, either of saints x>r sinners, we of kindness to our fellow men, or forms of 



worship, such as reading 'he scriptures, 
prayer, singing, hearing preaching, medi- 
tation, and abstaining from wicked actions, 
he plead as means of obtaining salvation or 
grace, or as means of keeping ourselves in 
divine favor, then, inevitably, the reward 
is not reckoned of grace, but of debt: 
(Rom. iv. 4:) whereas, grace comes thro' 
faith, and is not the reward of any ihing, 
but is a free gift. (Rom. v. 16:) And i) 
the antimonians of 1538 only meant that, 
the law does not require of men, nor bind 
them to, gospel exercises, as a life giving 
covenant; nor execute its severest penalty 
upon the saints for every sinful act of the 
flesh, then are they not worthy of the 
name of antinominns, but arc establishers 
of the law; and their accusers are them- 
selves antinomians, as we shall proceed to 
show. In order to do this, we shall prom- 
ise that, the Moral Law of God, under the 
gospel dispensation, is obligatory and bind- 
ing, both in its precepts and penalty on the 
unbeliever; and in its precepts on the be- 
liever. Moreover, that the whole duty of 
man to God,- as Creator, Lawgiver, and 
Judge, is embraced in that Law. And 
whoever adds to, substitutes, abrogates, re- 
peals, derogates from, or diminish.es, that 
Law, is, according to the above definition 
and scriptures, an antinomian. Further- 
more, all who do not believe that every 
gospel blessing is a free gift; and that they 
who are saved by grace thro' faith, and no 
more liable to eternal death, are antinomi- 
ans. 

To carry out and establish the above 
propositions, we will have recourse to the 
Epistle to the Romans. The writer of this 
epistle, it seems, had been charged by cer- 
tain people about Rome, [professors of reli- 
gion we should judge,] with being what, in 
our tongue, would be called an antinomian. 
To acquit, himself in this matter, he lays 
down in his epistle, with the positive and 
absolute certainty of divine as;-eveiation, 
the continued and strict obligation of the 
law; and shows how perfectly the doctrine 
of salvation by grace harmonizes with the 
obligations of that law. 

lie shows them first, tint the law was 
binding even on the Gentiles, who had not. 
received a dispensation of it sifter the man- 
ner of the Jews; and that the Gentiles were 
guilty of its violation, and by it stood con- 
demned. The invisible things of him from 
the creation of the world are clearly seen, 
being understood by the things that are 
nfcide, even his eternal power and God- 
head : so that they are without excuse. — 
— As many as have sinned without law, 



shall also perish without law. (Rom. i. 
20. ii. 12.) 

Secondly : that it was binding upon the 
Jews who had received it, and condemned 
them for the least breach or deviation. As 
many as have sinned in ihe law shill be 
judged by the law. For not the hearers of 
the law are just before God, but the doers 
of the law shall be justified. For when 
the Gentiles, which have not the law, do 
by nature the things contained in the law, 
these, having not the lav/, are a law unto 
themselves: Which show the work of the 
law written in their hearts, their conscience 
also bearing witness 1 , and their thoughts the 
mean while accusing, or el^e excusing one 
another, ii. 12, 13, 14, 15. 

Thirdly: that it was in such force that 
its friends who approved it, and pleaded 
for its being obeyed, were condemned by 
it to suffer its penalty, if they departed in 
the smallest degree from one of its precepts. 
Behold, thou art called a Jew, and restest 
in the law, and makest thy boast of God : 
Thou that makest thy boast, of the law, 
through breaking the law dishonorest thou 
God? Thou that preachest, A man should 
not steal, dost thou steal? And triinkest 
thou this, man, that judgest them which 
do such ihings, and doest the same, that 
thou shalt escape the judgment of God? ii. 
17, 23,21, 3. 

Fourthly : That under all circumstan- 
ces, it was obligatory on Jews, Gentiles, 
and all men, so that all stood guilty by its 
transgression, and condemned by its sen- 
tence. For we have before proved both 
Jews and Gentiles that they are all under 
sin. What things soever the law saith, it 
saithtothem who are under the law, that 
every mouth may be stopped, and all the 
world may become guilty before God. iii. 
9, 19. 

Fifthly : That such was its force and 
firmness, that it relaxed and relinquished 
hoiking from its requirements, and aba- 
ted and remitted nothing horn its penalty ; 
so that man's justification by its deeds was, 
to all intents, and forever, impossible. — 
Yea, let God be true, but every man a liar; 
asii is written, That thou mightcst be jus- 
tified in thy sayings, and mightest over- 
come when thou art judged. By the deeds 
of the law there shall no flesh be justified 
in his sight, iii. 4, 20. 

Sixthly : That, so unalterably binding- 
were its precepts, and so inflexibly just was 
its penalty, that, sooner than excuse or jus- 
tify a single transgressor against it, God 
would magnify it by the obedience and 
death of his own Son, — would wound 



him, and bruise him, and deliver him up to the creature's part is a work, (for he can 



death, even the death of the cross. Being; 
justified freely by his grace, through the 
redemption that is in Jesus Christ : Whom 
God hath set forth to be a propitiation 
through faith in his blood, to declare his 
righteousness for the remission of sins that 
are past, through the forbearance of God; 
;o declare, 1 say, his righteousness, that he 



perform nothing but what is a work,) and 
the law is satisfied with no payment but in 
Christ: it is resolved upon having either 
Christ's obedience, or man's death. — 
Every debt punishable with, or to be dis- 
charged by, death, is due to the law : and 
if it be paid to the gospel, the law is wrong- 
ed out of its right. Every claim of this 
might be just, and the unjustifier of him I kind upon sinners as due to the gospel, is 



which believeth in Jesus. He that spared 
not his own Son, but delivered him up for 
us all. iii. 24,25, 26. viii. 32. 



a contempt and trespass upon the rights of 
the law. Now to him that worketh is the 
reward not reckoned of grace, but of debt. 



Seventhly: That so intensely binding But to him that worketh not, but believeth 
was the law, that it could not but punish j on him that justificth the ungodly, his faith 
him who was found in human nature, with j is counted for righteousness. (Rom. ty. 
only the imputation of our offences upon 14,5:) This is the reason why help is. laid 
him. For in that he died, he died unto j upon one that is mighty, and without sin;- 
sin once : bul in that he liveth, he liveth I and to him alone the law looks for tlTe 
unto God. God sending his own Son in debts of all his people. Much more then, 
the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, I being now justified by his blood, we shall 
condemned sin in the flesh. Who was de- I be saved from wrath through him. For if, 
livered for our offences, and was raised again ! when we were enemies, we were reconcil- 
for our justification, vi. 10. viii. 3. iv.25. | ed to God thro' the death of his Son, much 

In the foregoing view of the subject, the | more, being reconciled, we shall be saved 
accusers of the apostle could no longer rea- by his life. By the obedience of one shall 
sonably consider him an antinomian. But I many be made righteous, v. 9, 10, 19: 
in the apostle's view of it, we must set : Conditional salvation places it in the hands 



CiOvvn as antinomians. 

First : All who hold the doctrine, that, 
Christ by his obedience and death, released 
all men from their obligation to the law, 



of man to buy up the decrees of the law, 
by some little turn or shift of his own; 
whereas, the law holds its decrees too sa- 
cred to be bartered or sold, too firm 

and required their obedience to the gospel I to be suspended upon the willing, or run- 
as the condition of their salvation. For ! ning, or working, of its offenders. I will 
this doctrine takes from the law its right I have mercy on whom I will have mercy, 
in judgment, and gives it to another power, ! and I will have compassion on whom I 
that is, the gospel, to judge offenders against will have compassion. So then it is not of 
the law. In doing this, it robs the law of: him that willeth nor of him that runneth, 
its strength, or power to punish; for the | but of God that sheweth mercy, ix. 15, 16. 
strength of sin is the law, and not the gos- j Thirdly : Those who hold the doctrine 
pel. By this doctrine loo, the righteous- j of free will, self-sufficiency, or indepen- 
uessof the law fails to be fulfilled in us j dent control of the will. For this is to af- 
who walk not after the flesh, but after the i firm that, man may at any moment, dis- 
Spirit. For it leaves us still upon the plan charge himself from the law's sentence, by 



of our obedience for salvation; but it robs 
the law of that obedience, and transfers it, 
without fulfilment in us, to the claims of 
the gospel. This doctrine likewise, in 
effect, destroys the law, inasmuch as it is 
of no more use, and cannot speak in time 
nor eternity to any man, but must give 
back for the gospel to command and, to 
punish. Think not that I am come to de- 
stroy the law or the prophets : I am not 
come to destroy, but fulfil. (Matt. v. 17.) 
Secondly : Those who hold that, salva- 
tion is suspended upon any effort or condi- 
tion on the creature's part, such as repent- 
ing and believing, as the means of grace or 
salvation. Because, that doctrine makes 



a new direction of his own will; so that the 
law turns him loose if he has a mind to go, 
with no other satisfaction than the crimi- 
nal's own choice. Whereas the truth says, 
Being justified by faith, we have peace 
with God, through our Lord Jesus Christ. 
It is not of him that willeth. v. 1. ix. 16: 
The law therefore will still hold its grasp, 
until faith comes, and offers it an obedient 
and punished Christ. 

Fourthly : Those who hold the doctrine 
that faith, repentance, &c. are duties, and 
obligatory upon the impenitent and unbe- 
lieving. " Now hearken to Paul : For when 
ye were the servants of sin, ye were free 
from righteousness, vi. 20: While men 



salvation by debt; since every condition on are under the law, no gospcJ obligation rests 



upon them. To hold the graces ano< £'ft s 
of faith and repentance to be the duty of 
unawakened sinners, is to maintain that 
man did not owe all Ids duty and service to 
the law, hut reserved a part to be discharg- 
ed when the gospel should come, or else 
that the law, when the gospel came, made 
a compromise, and surrendered part of its 
claims, and agreed that, if the sinner would 
pay certain duties, not specified in the law, 
that it would yield all its proper claims. 
We may add, if these gospel gifts be duties, 
then upon failing to repent and believe, the 
gospel must usurp the law's seat, and pass j 
sentence itself on the offender: whereas, 
the law cannot punish a man for offences 
committed against the gospel, nor vice 
versa. Else the gospel becomes the minis- 
tration of death, and cheats the law of its 
demands. It likewise ascribes to the law j 
demands which it never made, and cheats 
the gospel of its free gift. It is the old 
leaven of the pharisees, do andlive : where- 
as all who do, must do for the law; and all 
who do for the law, must die; for this the 
law requires. It is true, without repent- 
ance, men must perish; without faith, they 
shall be damned. But these are the gifts 
of God, and are the path along which the 
sinner is led from condemnation and 
perishing. In repentance he is pleased to 
make known the claims of Justice in man's 
condemnation and death; in faith, to make 
known the satisfaction of those claims ren- 
dered by the Lord Redeemer, and the pro- 
priety of his discharge from the law, and 
his title to eternal life. 

Fifthly : 'Those who maintain that the 
prayers, efforts, and wealth of men, would 
be instrumental in saving souls, which for 
lack of such things are lost, must also be 
set down as antinomians. For this doc- 
trine declares that the law punishes those of 
whom it has received satisfaction. For if 
heathen or any others were not atoned for 
by Christ, the money and efforts of men | 
could avail no more for them, than the tears | 
of Esau could towards recovering his birth- | 
right. The law could not surrender them 
into the hands of the money, efforts, and 
prayers of men, without satisfaction. And 
to all who are atoned for by Christ, the gift 
of faith will make the atonement known. 
Therefore it. is of faith, that it might be by 
grace; to the end the promise might be 
sure to all the seed. iv. 10: The law lets 
none go without the uttermost farthing. 
And if the law received satisfaction for 
them so that it could make a tender of 
"many precious souls" to the meausof the 
jewelry, ^c. of American ladies., then none 



but antinomians believe that the law is now 
executing its wrath upon them in "the 
quenchless fires of hell." 

The law acknowledges, the e'ect are jus- 
tified by God, and is pleased to hear Jeho- 
vah defy all beings and all things to lay any 
thing to their charge. Who shall lay any 
thing to the charge of Cod's elect? It is 
God that justifieth. Who is he that con- 
demned? viii. 33. 3 4. But the doctrine 
that money and effort would save many 
who are otherwise lost denies the doctrine 
of election, makes money and effort a sa- 
viour to men and leaves the law to seek its 
satisfaction long after Christ's death, hi 
works which it never required, or to go 
forever unsatisfied. This the law cannot 
do, if God be just; and ail the benevolent 
institutions which are manifestly the off- 
spring of antinomiauism and antichristian- 
ism, are now mocking the law, shaming the 
gospel, and deluding tens of thousands of 
people with their plausible appearance. 

Seeing that it is proved from the whole- 
epistle to the Romans that, he who believes 
the law will abate aught from its precepts 
or penalty, save for the obedience and 
death of Christ, is an antinomian; because 
he is opposed to the immutability and in- 
flexible justice of the law: and seeing like- 
wise that the saints of God do, thro' faith, 
establish the law, by being able to receive 
and offer Christ a complete answer to the 
law's demands, and by which faith, as the 
law written in their hearts, and working by 
love, they are led to choose and delight in 
the law of God after the inward man, and 
serve it with their mind: Do we then make 
void the law through faith? God forbid: 
yea, we establish the law. Fori delight 
in the law of God after the inward man. 
So then, with the mind, I myself serve 
the law of God. iii. 31. vii. 22,25. And 
seeing moreover, that those who depart 
from it, are antinomians; it is clearly 
shown that the New School Baptists 
amongst others, are such. And while they 
have departed from the written word of 
God, and thereby treated the law of God 
with contempt, and the gospel of Christ 
with reproach; they have added to their 
list, the sin of charging the Old School Bap- 
tists with their own errors. And now, un- 
til they shal3 have changed in their faith 
and practice, they must stand, whether 
they confess it or deny it, as antinomians. 
— The Lord teach them, as well as us, the 
good and the right way. 

These thoughts, beloved of the Lord, we 
freely submit to your careful examination, 
exhorting you to compare them with the 



scriptures, and, if they agree with them, to 
receive them. But we do not consider 
ourselves infallible; nor do we now serve 
ourselves in laying these thoughts before 
you. If you find us in error, you may 
then have opportunity to be of great ser- 
vice to us, with but little trouble to your- 
selves, by evincing to us our error. But 
-should you discover us to be wrong, and 
not apprise u^ of it, you could not be con- 
side, ed faithful to God, to us, nor to your- 
selves. We would be strictly dealt with 
by our brethren, and even sharply, rather 
than remain in error. And we exhort you 
to remember that, he is neither a faithful 
Christian nor a faithful minister, who is 
unwilling to have his thoughts and opinions 
examined, controverted, and refuted too, 
when erroneous. And be assured that Old 
School Baptists have to make another ad- 
vance before they reach the standard of pri- 
mitive and apostolic candor and faithfulness, 
if they would countenance error for the sake 
of avoiding controversy. Discussions of 
disputed and opposite opinions, should be 
conducted in a christianlike manner; and 
they are so conducted when we act for 
Christ: but if you would hazard the truth 
in preference to discussion, you are not 
worthy of the name of Christ. 

The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be 
with you all. Amen. 

29th October, 1838. 

-<^£>* 

THE CONSTITUTION, 

Or, Form oj Government of t he Content- 

nea Baptist ^Association. 

From a long series of experience, We, 
the churches of Jesus Christ, being regular- 
ly baptized upon the profession of our faith 
in Christ, are convinced of the necessity of 
a combination of churches, in order to per- 
petuate a union and communion amongst 
us, and preserve and maintain a correspon- 
dence with each other in our union: We 
therefore propose to maintain and keep the 
order and rules of an Association, accord- 
ing to the following Plan or Form of Gov- 
ernment, viz: 

Art. 1. The Association shall be com- 
posed of members chosen by the different 
churches in our union, and duly sent to re- 
present them in the Association, who shall 
be members, whom they judge best quali- 
fied for that purpose, and producing letters 
from their respective churches, certifying 
their appointment, shall be entitled to a 
seat: Provided, they shall not violate the 
rules further laid down in this constitution. 

Art. 2. In the letters from the different 



. churches, shall be expressed, their number 

i in full fellowship, those baptized, received 

| by letter, dismissed by letter, excommuni- 

1 cated, and dead, since our last Association. 

Art. 3. The members thus chosen and 

convened, shall have no power to lord it 

over God's heritage — nor shall thev have 

any ecclesiastical power ov(#the churches; 

nor shall they infringe any of the internal 

rights of any church in the union. 

Art. 4. The Association when convened^ 
shall be governed and ruled by a regular 
and proper decorum. 

Art. 5. The Association shall have a 
Moderator and Clerk, who shall be chosen 
by the suffrage of the members present. 

Art. 6. New churches may be admitted 
into this union, who shall petition by letter 
| and delegates — and upon examination, (if 
j found orthodox and orderly,) shall be re- 
I ceived by the Association, and manifested 
j by the Moderator, giving the delegates the 
i right hand of fellowship. 
| Art. 7. Every church in the union shall 
; be entitled to representation in this Associ- 
| ation, but shall have only three members 
j from each church. 

Art. 8. Every query presented by any 
! member in the Association shall be twice 
read: and before it be debated, the Mode- 
rator shall put it to vote ; and if there be a 
majority for its being debated, it shall be 
taken into consideration, and be delibera- 
ted; but if there be a majority against it, 
it shall be withdrawn. 

Art. 9. Every motion made and second- 
ed, shall come under the consideration of 
the Association, except it be withdrawn 
by the member who made it. 
! Art 10. The Association shall endea- 
vor to furnish the churches with the Min- 
utes of the Association. The best method 
for effecting that purpose shall be at the dis- 
■ cretion of the Associations. 
I Art. 11. We think it absolutely neces- 
sary that we should have an Association 
fund, for defraying the expenses of the 
same; for the raising and supporting of 
I which, we think it the duty of each church, 
in the union, to contribute voluntarily such 
sums as they shall think proper, and send 
by the hands of their delegates to the As- 
sociation; and those monies thus contribu- 
ted by the churches and received by the 
Association, shall be deposited in the hands 
j of a Treasurer, by the Association, who 
j shall be accountable to the Association for 
ali monies by him received, and paid out 
according to the direction of the Association, 
Art. 12. The Minutes of the Associa- 



8 
lion, when printed, shall be regularly filed 
by the Clerk, and the book by him shall 
be kept for the use of the Association, and 
he shall endeavor to have said book pre- 
sent at each Association. 

Art. 13. The Minutes of the Associa- 
tion shall be read, (and corrected, if need 
be,) and sigi^d by the Moderator and 
Clerk before the Association arises. 

Art. 14. Amendments to this Plan or 
Form, of Government, may be made at any 
time by the majority of the union, when 
they may deem it necessary. 

Art. 15. The Association shall have 
power — i 

1 . To provide for the general union of the 
churches-. 

2. To preserve inviolably a chain of com- 
munion amongst the churches. 

3. To give the churches all necessary ad- 
vice in matters of difficulty. 

4. To inquire into the cause why the 
churches fail to represent themselves at ; 
any time in the Association. j 

5. To appropriate those monies by the j 
churches contributed for an Association ] 
fund, to any purpose strictly connected j 
with the business of this Association. j 

6. To appoint any 'member or members, 
by and with his or their consent, to j 
transact any business which they may 
see necessary. 

7. The Association shall have power to 
withdraw from any church in this union, 
which violate the rules of this Associa- 
tion, or deviate from the orthodox prin- 
ciples of religion. 

S. To admit any of the distant brethren in 
the ministry as assistants, who may be 
present at the time of their sitting, 
whom they shall judge necessary. 
9. The Association shall have power to 
adjourn themselves to any future time or 
place they may think most convenient 
to the churches' in the union. 
Art. 16. We wUl not hold in our chur- 
ches any member who is in the practice of 
visiting the Masonic Lodges; or who, on 
any occasion, conforms to their custom of 
parades; nor will we countenance any 
such individual, who may reside or come 
among us, in the character of a prea- 
cher. 

Art. 17. We will not countenance any 
preacher who shall travel within the 
bounds of our Association, establishing so- 
cieties for the collection of money, or who 
may himself be collecting money to -sup- 
port any institution whatever. We will 
not fellowship any member or members of 



Missionary, Bible, Tract, or Sunday School 
Union, Societies, nor advocates of Theolo- 
gical Schools, nor any person who does 
fellowship them, nor will we hold any 
such in our churches. 

femjLMa OF DECORUM. 

Art. 1. The Association shall be open- 
ed and closed by prayer. 

Art. 2. The Moderator and Clerk shall 
be chosen by the suffrages of the members 
present. 

Art. 3. Only one person shall speak at 
a time, who shall rise from his seat and 
address the Moderator, when he is about 
to make his speech. 

Art. 4. The person thus speaking shall 
not be interrupted in his speech by any ex- 
cept the Moderator, till he is done speaking. 

Art. 5. He shall strictly adhere to the 
subject, and in no wise reflect on the per- 
son who spoke before, so as to make re- 
marks on his slips, failings or imperfec- 
tions, but shall fairly state the case and 
matter as near as he can, so as to convey 
his light or ideas. 

Art. 6. No person shall abruptly break 
off or absent himself from the Association 
without liberty obtained from it. 

Art. 7. No person shall rise and speak 
more than three times to one subject, with- 
out liberty from the Association. 

Art. 8. No member of the Association 
shall have liberty of laughing during the 
sitting of the same, nor of whispering in 
the time of a public speech. 

Art. 9. No member of the Association 
shall address another in an}^ other terms or 
appellations than that of brother. 

Art. 10. The Moderator shall not inter- 
rupt any member in, or prohibit him from, 
speaking, till he gives his light on the sub- 
ject except he break the rules of this deco- 
rum. 

A rt. 11. The names of the several mem- 
bers of the Association shall be enrolled by 
the Clerk and called over as often as the As- 
sociation requires. 

Art. 12. The Moderator shall be the last 
person who shall speak to the subject, who 
may give his opinion if he please before he 
puts the matter to a vote; but shall have no 
vote himself, unless the Association be 
equally divided. 

Art. 13. Any member who shall will- 
ingly and knowingly break any of these 
rules, shall be reproved by the Association 
as they may think proper. 

Tar bur 6* Press. 



mNtr$S$ OF Tim WMTH ANNUAL §E§§IOr¥ ©2? TME 

Conteatnca Baptist Association, 

Held at Red Banks, Pitt County, N. C. on the 25, 26, and 27 Oct. 1839. 



FRIDAY, Oct. 25. 

The Introductory Sermon was preach- 
ed by Elder Thomas Dupree, from Heb. ii. 
2. 3. For if the word spoken by angels was 
steadfast, and every transgression and dis- 
obedience received a just recompense of re- 
ward; how shall we escape if we neglect 
so great salvation. 

The delegates assembled for business, and 
chose Elders, Thomas Dupree Moderator, 
Mark Bennett Clerk, brother Beardsley As- 
sistant Clerk; and brethren S. Tison & J.C. 
Knight a committee of finance; and reques- 
ted said committee to report on Saturday. 

Corresponding messengers, and ministers 
from corresponding Associations, were in- 



vited to sit with us: Elders, Humphrey 
Stallings, from Kehukee, bearing a letter 
and a file of their Minutes; Robert McKee 
from Country Line, with a file of theirs; 
Jesse Adams and Burwell Temple from 
Little River, bringing a letter and Minutes 
from theirs; Parham Pucket from White 
Oak, having a letter and a file from their 
body; and Ashley Swaim and brother Ai- 
red, from Abbott's Creek Union, with 
Minutes of theirs for '38 and ; 39, were re- 
ceived, and took seats with us. 
v Letters from the churches were read, 
in which they stated their delegation, 
numbers and contribution, as in the fol- 
lowing table: 



Churches and Counties 
wherein situated. 



NAMES OF DELEGATES. 



Autrey's Creek, Edgecombe, r tl. Reasons,f J. R. Moore, W. Crisp, 



Beaver Dam, Lenoir, 
Black Creek, Wayne, 
Galloway's, Pitt, 
Hancock's, do% 
Meadow, Greene, 
Memorial, Wayne, 
Nauhunty, do. 
Pleasant Hill, Edgecombe, 
Pleasant Plains, Wayne, 
Red Banks, Pitt, 
Sandy Bottom, Lenoir, 
Tison's, Pitt, 
Toisnot, Edgecombe, 
Town Creek, do. 
Union, dot 

White Oak, do. 



A. Jones, L. Neathercut, L. Williams, 
Wm. Bass, Isham Lamm,f A. Barden,f 
N. Buck, J. Haddock, S. Corbin, 

H. Smith, T. Wilson, A. Gardner, 

B. Bynum, W. Williams, A. Joyner, 
W. Bass, E. Holland, T. Jones, 
W.. Taylor, S. Pate, S. Pate, 

J. Proctor, W T . Proctor,f Si Bras well, 
VV, Smith, J. Mines, A Ellis, 
J. Griffin, C. Nelson, J. McGowns, 
R. Rouse, E. Whaley,f 
S. Moore, S. Tison, B, Briley, 
W. Rountree,f M« Farmer, VV. Woodard, 
T. Dupree, J. C. Knight, M. Bennett, 
M. Whitehead, A. Whitehead, J. Bailey, 
J. Ellis, J. B. Woodard, I. Moore, 
f affixed denotes absent* 



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Inquired if there were any church peti- 
tioning for membership. 

Read the letters - from corresponding As- 
sociations. 

The Circular Letter was called for, 
handed forward, and referred to a commit- 
tee, consisting of Elders, Dupree, I. 
Moore, Temple, Bynum, and Bennett, for 
examination; and they were requested to 
report on it the next day. 

Appointed messengers to sister Associa- 



tions: Elders, M. Bennett and B. Bynum 
to Country Line and Abbott's Creek Uni- 
on; Bynum, I Moore, and Bennett to Lit- 
tle River; I. Moore, J. Griffin, and Ben- 
nett to Kehukee; and brethren A. E lis 
and J. R. Moore to White Oak: and direc- 
ted to ha sent, 40 copies of our Minutes to 
Kehukee; 20 to Country Line, Abbott's 
Creek Union, and Little River each, and 
15 to White Oak. 
The brethren appointed last year tovist't 



the church at Toisnot, reported, that as 
that church is now represented, they ask 
leave of the Association to be discharged 
without further report thereon; which was 
granted. 

The next session was appointed to he at 
Pleasant Hill, Edgecombe county, to com- 
mence Friday before the fourth Sunday in 
Ociober, 1840: Elder J. Griffin was ap- 
pointed to preach an Introductory Sermon; 
but if he faij. Eider Bynum: worship to 
begin at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

Appointed Elder Bynum to write a 
Circular to be attached to our next Minutes. 

Adjourned to Saturday, 10 o'clock, A. M. 

SATURDAY, Oct. 26. 

Met pursuant to adjournment. 

The Constitution and Rules of decorum 
were read. 

The list was called, and absent delegates 
noted. 

Eiders, Adams and Temple were ap- 
pointed to preach on Sunday; and worship 
to begin at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

The committee on the Circular reported 
favorably to its adoption: it was read, and 
the report concurred in. 

The committee of finance reported: 
Balance irTthe treasurypast year, $8 88 

Contributions at this session, S3 00 



Paid for printing Minutes last year, $15 00 





$41 


88 


115 


00 




15 


00 






— 30 


00 



rnui iur pruning iyihiuico last _y< 

Paid for printing these Minutes 



Now femainlng'in treasury, $11 88 

Oct, 26, 1839. SHERROD TISON, I r : 
J, C. KNIGHT, 5^o^' 

Inquiry by the church at Black Creek: 
Is it right that the Association should pay 
her corresponding messengers for attend- 
ing sister Associations? Answer by the 
Association: We consider that, It is not 
right. 

Appointed Elder Bennett to prepare 
these Minutes for press, to have 400 
copies printed, and distributed as hereto- 
fore; and to transcribe one copy into the 
Association book. 

The Minutes were read, and assigned 
by the Moderator and Clerk. 

Adjourned to the time and place of next 
session. 

THOMAS DUPREE, M'd. 

Mark ^Bennett. 

SUNDAY, Oct. 27. 

Elders, Adams and Temple preached, the 
former from the gospel by John sv. 5. J 



-\m the Vine, ye are the branches: the lat- 
ter from the vision of bones, Ezek. xxxvii. 
The word was preached with fervor and 
faithfulness, and heard with attention, and 
we hope with lasting effect by many. 



— '<•►»© © ©*w~ 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 

Dearly beloved Brethren: After 
enjoying the high privilege granted to us 
at our ninth annual Association, (by our 
heavenly Father,) we think proper to ad- 
dress you as our usual custom is, by way 
of a circular; and in searching Cora subject, 
we can find none impressed upon our 
minds with more force ti an thai of the 
support of the gospel ministry. But, 
brethren, by calling your attention to the 
support of the ministry, we do not attempt 
to teach you any thing more than you are 
already taught; but to stir up your pure 
minds, by way of remembrance. And, 
brethren, when you read this, do not as wa 
fear a goodly number do, that is, lay it 
down and think no more about it; but if it 
is according to the scripture, endeavor 
as much as in you lieth to put it into prac- 
tice. 

First, we will call your attention to the 
gospel minister, in a short way, and then 
endeavor to point out the means of his sup- 
port. And in doing this, you will no 
doubt wish us to bring forth some proof 
for our assertion. Weil, brethren, that 
we think to do. First, then, the gospel 
minister is a man that is made alive, as all 
other saints, by the Holy Ghost; as Paul 
says, Ephesians, 2 c. 1 v. And you hath he 
quickened, who were dead in trespasses 
and sins; 2 verse, Wherein in time pist ye 
walked according to the course of this 
world, according to the prince of the pow- 
er of the air, the spirit that now worketh 
in the children of disobedience: 3 v. A- 
mong whom also we all had our conversa- 
tion in times past, in the lusts of our flesh, 
fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the 
mind; and were by nature the children of 
wrath, even as others. 

Secondly, he has a call to the work of 
the- ministry J and this call also is of the Ho- 
ly Ghost, impressing his mind with the 
worth of souls in such away that he can 
take no rest with all the excuses he can 
make, with all the complainings of weak- 
ness, littleness, nothingness, ignorance, 
inability, &c. Nothing will do but a con- 
tinual wo on his mind, and to preaching 
j he must go. Yes, brethren, and to preach- 



ing he does go, (in the strength of the 
Lord,) and he will preach Jesus, and why? f 
because it is from Christ he gets his educa- 
tion, and we believe he is prepared for the 
work of the ministry when he is taught in 
the school of Christ, without going to 
any earthly seminary of learning to be 
better prepared for the work of the minis- 
try. For instead of this better preparing 
him, we believe it unfits him. For when 
we hear one that is taught in those earthly 
schools, he speaks in such high swelling 
words it is unto us as an unknown tongue^ 
Bu? we will leave them and pass along, 
knowing that our limits is in the bounds of 
a Circular. 

You know, brethren, that we said 
above, the gospel minister, had a call and 
that of the Holy Ghost; and we have 
said, he was taught in the school of Christ. 
Well, if we say God, or Christ, or the Ho- 
ly Ghost, we are right, according to the 
Gospel recorded by saint John, 1 c. I v. In 
the beginning was the Word, and the 
Word was with God, and the Word was 
God. And first epistle of John, 5 c. 7 v. 
For there are three that bare record in 
heaven, toe Father, the Word, and the 
Holy Ghost: and thes ci three are one. 
Much more might here be said about the 
call of the gospel minister, and the work 
assigned for him to do; but we promised 
to be short, as such ue will leave their 
call, and wok, at present, and go on to 
the subject proposed, that is, the means of 
their support. 

And here", brethren, do not be surpri- 
sed when we treat on this delicate subject, 
knowing that we have lately gotten out of 
a war of difficulties, believing that there 
were too many money hunters among us. 
Bui we will endeavor to keep good reason 
ami scripture close along with us, as . we 
go on. First.then, we know that his great 
support is from God; for when Christ was 
here on the earth, he called his apostles or 
ministers, and sent them forth, telling 
them, Matthew 10 c. 7 — 10 v. And, as ye 
go, preach, saying, The kingdom of 
heaven is at hand. Heal the sick, cleanse 
the lepers, raise the dead, east out devils: 
freely ye have received, freely give. Pro- 
vide neither gold, nor stiver, nor brass, 
in your purses: Nor scrip for your jour- 
ney, neither two coats, neither shoes, nor 
yet staves: for the workman is worthy of 
h'S meat. Again, the same thing, Mark 
6 c. 7 — 9 v. And he calleth unto him the 
twelve, and began to send them forth by 



two and two; and gave them power over 
unclean spirits; and commanded them that 
they should take nothing for their journey, 
save a staff only; no scrip, no bread, no 
money in their purse: But be shod with 
sandals; and not put on two coats. And 
again, Luke 9 c. 2, 3 v. And he sent 
them to preach the kingdom of God, and 
to heal the sick. And he said unto them, 
Take nothing for your journey, neither 
staves, nor scrip, neither bread, neither 
money; neither have too coats apiece. 
Luke 10 c. 7 v. And in the same house 
remain, eating and drinking such things as 
they give: for the laborer is worthy of 
his hire. Go not from house to house. 

Here, brethren, mark this:. Christ was 
here with his first gospel ministers, and 
limits them in their first commission, tel- 
ling them, Matthew 10 c. 5. 6 v. These 
twelve Jesus sent forth, and commanded 
them, saying: Go not into the way of the 
Gentiles, and into any city of the Samari- 
tans enter ye not; But go rather to the 
lost sheep of the house of Israel. Telling 
them further to take nothing, &c. as you 
have already seen. But when he is about 
to leave them, we find that he telleth them, 
Luke 22 c. 35, 36 v. And he said unto 
them, When I sent you without purse, 
and scrip, and shoes, lacked ye any thing? 
And they said, Nothing. Then said he 
unto them, But now, he that hath a purse 
let him take it, and likewise his scrip: and 
he that hath no sword, let him sell his gar* 
meut and buy" one. 

Do not think, brethren, that we mean 
that gospel ministers do not receive their 
support from God now; no, brethren, we 
believe it is by him we live and have our 
being, and all our blessings come from him 
with whom there is no variableness. And 
God is ever with his ministers, for saith 
he, Mathew 2S c. 20 v «Lo, 1 am with 
3<ou always, even unto the end of the 
world. But this is not ail we find in the 
scriptures of truth, for in them we find, 
that God has made it the duty of others to 
administer to their necessities. But before 
we bring forth our proof from the good 
Book, we will reason upon it a while; for 
you recollect, we said something about 
good reason being with us. Paul reason- 
ed, "and why not we? Well, say all hands, 
agreed. Well, then, we will suppose a 
case. We will say here is a poor preach- 
er, as to this world's goods, and he has a fa- 
mily that lies near his heart, and it appears 
from the nature of things it requires all 



his attention at home to support him and his 
family. Does not reason say'that, that man 
should have something to help him along? 
verily, yes. Well, here is this same man, 
sometimes lays all down with the love of 
God constraining him. bids farewell to a 
loving, w epi n% wife, & ten le'r little babes, 
trnsing rheaaj in the bauds of his Father-, 
which ' is in have a, no* knovsMngthat hi 
ever sh 1! sec them again on erinh, leaves 
th *iri all b 'hind and g es from one to 'bur 
we$fes and some ^\m * mor , preaching as 
he g. e^ Chri t and him cm ifi.:l: here rea- 
son says, this man ought to have .something 
to lis e upon. 

Bui an objector wou'd say, he has, for 
he lives noon ihe best; very true, but what 
becomes of his poor wife and children? 
This the objector must answer, and clear 
Ids own conscience before his God. But 
suppose he on'y goes to the churches 
around him every Saturday and Sunday, 
which Sunday you know is noi counted as 
a day to labor for the flesh, you know thaf 
this takes up a considerable time in a year. 
For you ail know that the year has fifty- 
two weeks in it, and it is commonly said 
that twenty-six working days are a month; 
here then are two whole months in one 
year spent to the use of the community at 
large; fn* the one half of fifty-two is twen- 
ty-six. Ex'end it to twelve years, and we 
see that one whole year is spent for the 
benefit of the churches, and the glory of 
God, and the worih of souls, while all of 
his attention is lost al home. 

Does not reason speak loud here and 
say, this preacher should have something 
given to him? Yes. But, brethren, we 
must stop reason, for here we might fill 
pages aud not tell you all the difficulties 
that lie in the paih of ihe preacher of 
God, and say in the language of holy writ: 
if in this life only we have hope in Christ, 
we are of all men most miserable (the 
preacher. ) 

Well, brethren, we have left reason, 
and are now going to search for them whose 
duty it is to support the gospel minister; 
and the first place that we shal] go is, Ro- 
man*, 12 c. 13 v. Distributing to the ne- 
cessity of saints: given to hospitality. 
Here we discover that Paul was exhorting 
the church at Rome to several duties, 
and among the rest fiat of distributing to 
the necessity of saints. Oljjec ion. We 
know that, but not a word is said about the 
gospel minister (hut to the saints) in that 
text. Answer. This is Strang that a 



gospel minister is not a saint; for if he is 
not. a saint, he is not fit to be a prea« her 
for Christ, and cannot feed the saints with 
the sincere milk of ( he word Wed, as 
long as you object to this, we will look out 
ac.ain; and the next pi ace is, 1 Corinthi? 
ansj 9 c. 7 — 14 v. Who go^th a war- 
fire any time at his 6 wia charges? Who 
plan.tetti a vineyard, and eateth not of 
the fruit thereof-? Or. wh > feed th $ flock, 
a id e at :th not of the milk of the flock? 
Say [ these things as a man, or saith not 
the h.vt'i: saVite also? For it is written in 
the la v of Moses, thou shalt not muzzle, the 
mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn. 
Doth God take core for oxen? Or, saith he 
it altogether for our sakes? For our sakes, 
no doubt, this is written: that he that 
plougheth should plough in hope; and that 
he that thresheth in hope, should be parta- 
ker of his hope. If we have sown unto 
you spiritual 'things, is it a great thing 
if we shall reap your carnal things? If oth- 
ers be partakers of this power over you, are 
not- we rather? Nevertheless, we have not 
used this power; but suffer all things lest 
we should hinder the gospel of Christ. 
Do not ye know, that they which minister 
about holy things, live of things of the tem- 
ple? and they which wait at the altar, are 
partakers- with the altar? Even so hath the 
Lord ordained that they which preach the 
gospel, should live of ihe gospel. 

Here Paul notices several things, and as- 
ked eleven questions, such as, who goeth a 
warfare any time at his own charges? Who 
planteth a vineyard, &c. First, then, they 
are compared to soldiers, and justly too; 
for it is the duty of the soldier for the love 
he has to his country, to go and undergo 
all the difficulties of a soldier, whether he 
ever gets any tiling or not; and that not at 
his own charges. Second, the vineyard is 
to be p'anted, whether it ever gives fruit 
to the planter or not. Third, the flock is 
to be fed, if they never give the feeder 
one drop of milk. We cannot answer all 
these questions at this time, knowing we 
are sending you a letter and wish to be 
short as possible. Mark this, the soldier 
must first go to war, before be can expect 
a reward. And the planter must first 
plant, before he can expect fruit. And the 
feeder must feed his flock, before he eateth 
the milk of the flock. 

Even so, brethren, it. is the duty of the 
gospel minister to go into the spiritual 
war, taking the shield of faith, knowing 
that the weapons of his warfare are not 



9 



carnal. Also to go inlo the vineyard of 
God and labor, if he gets none of the fruit 
of the vineyard. And to feed the spiritual 
flock, if the flock never skives him no milk to 
e.it. Yes, brethren, they recollect the solemn 
charge in 1 Peter 5. c. 2, 3 v. Feed the 



flock of God which is anions 



vou. 



taking 



the oversight thereof, not by constraint, 
but willingly; not for filthy lucre, but of a 
ready mind; Neither as being lords ever 
God's heritage, but being ensamples to 
the flock. Who then are those that should 
give unto the gospel ministry? Why 
those that have been fed by him in spirit- 
ual things. See here 11 verse, If we have 
sown unto you spiritual things, is it. a great 
thing if tee (Paul and others) shall reap 
)'our carnal things? Again, In Galatians, 
6. c. 2 — 6 v. Bear ye one another's bur- 
dens, and so fulfil the law of Christ. For, 
if a man think himself to he something 
when he is nothing, he deceiveth himself. 
But let every man prove his own work, 
and then shall he have rejoicing in him- 
self alone, and not in another. For every 
man shall bear his own burden. Let him 
that is taught, in the word communicate un- 
to him that teacheth in all good things. 
Thessalonians, 5 c. 12,13 v. And we be- 



that labor among you: you are to esteem 
them very highly. And the elders and es- 
pecially those that labor in word and doc- 
trine, be counted worthy of double honor. 
And those that speak to you the word of 
God you should remember. Behold how 
nice all this works with reason: For in 
eyery place where any thing is required 
to be given to the preacher, there must 
first be some benefit received of him, such 
as spiritual things, word and doctrine, la- 
bor, &c. Yes, brethren, they will bestow 
this benefit of spiritual things n you, 
whether you ever bestow your carnal 
things or not. 

Very different is this from the modern 
missionaries, for they must first have their 
charge, before they go on a warfare; they 
must have the fruit, before they plant the 
vineyard; they must drink the milk, be- 
fore they feed the flock. And if one 
comes along, and you do not not give him 
your carnal things, and that in a great 
plenty too, he will not let you have much 
of what he may call spiritual things. 
You may think this is judging, but the 
tree is to be known by its fruit. 

Brethren, we have here brought to your 
remembrance those who should receive, 



seech you, brethren, to know them which and those who should give. We will now 
labor among you, and are over you in the : say how much the giver should give. 
Lord, and admonish you; & to esteem them ' What, say some, is the amount laid down? 
very highly in love for their work's sake. I Yes, brethren, to a fraction, if you will 
And be at peace among yourselves. 1 Tim- look. 2 Corinthians, 9 c. 7 v. Every man 
othy, 5. e. 17, 18 v. Let the elders that according as he purposeth in his heart, 
rule well, be counted worthy of double so let him give; not grudingly, or of ne- 
honor, especially they who labor in the cessity: for God lovelh a cheerful giver, 
word and doctrine. For the scripture But, say some, suppose he never purposeth 
saith, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox that to give any thing, what then? Answer, 
treadeth out the corn: and, the laborer Let him alone, to his own master he stand- 
is worthy o his reward. Hebrews, 13. ' eth or falleth. But the apostle seems to be 
c. 7, 8 v Remember them which have the doubtful whether the love of God dwellelh 
rule over you, who have spoken unto you 10 such a man or not. 1 John, 3 c. 17 v. 
the word of God: whose faith follow, con- But whoso hath this world's good, and seeth 
sidering the end of their conversation, Je- his brother have need, and shulteth up 
sus Christ the game ye terday, and to day, his bowels of compassion from him, how 
and forever. , dwelleth the love of God in him? 18 

Brethren, we think- we have brought verse. My little children, let us not love 
forth texts enough to prove who are those in word, neither in tongue; but indeed and 
that should support the gospel minister. I in truth. Do you not say or think some- 
And if you will not hear these, we feel per- j times, such or such a brother should have 
suaded that you would not hear if we | something given to him, for he is a poor 
were to bring forth more. And if you j man, and do you do it? If not, here is 
will bear with us a little we will tell you how faith without works. And what does the 
you are to support them. First, he that ' apostle say about it? See James, 2 c. 14 — 
sows spiritual things to you, you should 17 v. What doth it profit, my brethren, 
let him reap your B carnal things. Second, though a man say he hath faith and have 
he that teacheth you: you should communi- 



cate to him in all good things. And those 



not works? Can faith save him? If a 
brother or sister be naked, and destitute of 



daily food, and one of you say unto them, 
depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled; 
notwithstanding ye give them not those 
things which are needful to the body ; what 
doth ir profit? Even so faith, if it hath 
not works, is dead, being alone. And 
the 26 verse reads, For as the body wit out 
th j spirit is dead, so faith without works 
is dead aiso, 

A >ui, bjethren, these good things are to 
be laid by] ready for the time when they 
should b needed, K.'onn hinns, 1 c. 1,2 v. 
Nov concerning the collection for the 
sakits, as I have given order to the churches 
at Gailatia even s6 do ye. Ujon the- first 
dav o! she weeks let every one of you la\ 
by him in store, as God hath prospered 
him, that there be no gatherings when 1 
come. And what, says the giver, shall I 
receive for all my laying up and bestowing 
my goods to the preacher? Answer, 
We have already told von that you have his 
(spiritual things, &c. But this is not all you 
will have. See Uorin hians, S c. 2 v. How 
that in a great trial of affliction the abundance 
of their joy and their deep poverty abound- 
ed unto the riches of their liberality. You 
see that Christians in apostolic days receiv- 
ed joy. Yes, brethren, ye will feel a kind 
of joy springing up in the -heart, when 
ye do those things that are commanded you 
•by God. 

We will now bring forth some examples 
of Christians in japostolic days, and come 
to a close as soon as possible; for we fear 
We are making our letter too long. The 
first place we shal-1 go is Acts, 4 c. 34, 35 v. 
Neither was there any among them that 
Jacked; for as many as were possessed of 
lands or houses, sold them, and brought 
the prices of the things that were sold, and 
laid Ihem down at the apostles' feet: & dis- 
tribution was made unto every man accor- 
ding as he had need. Acts, 1 1 c. 29, 30 v. 
Then the disciples, every man according to 
his ability, determined to send relief unto 
the brethren which dwelt in Judea, which 
also they did, and sent it to the Elders by 
the hand of Barnabas and Saul. Romans 
15 c. 26 27 v. For it hath pleased them 
of Macedonia and Achaia to make a certain 
contribution for the poor saints which are 
at Jerusalem. It hath pieased them verily; 
and their debtors they are. For if the 
Gentiles have been made partakers of their 
spiritual things, their duty is also to 
minister unto them in carnal things. 

Here are examples enough; go thou 
then, brethren, and do likewise. And when 



you see your brother has need, do as tha 
primitive Christians, send it to him, accor- 
ding to yourability, and do not say, brother, 
if you will come to my house 1 will give 
you thus and thus; for if he does not go, you 
will not like it so well, and will be ready to 
^ay, i fit was not worth coming after, it is not 
worth having. And withal he feels a deli- 
cacy in going, &c. So the better way is to 
send it to him according to the pattern above 
written. Hut vou will here be ready to 
-ay, 1 know no p >or saint that does not 
have food and raiment, and v is written in 
! Timothy, 6 c. 7. ^ v. Fo>" we brought 
nothing into this world, and ft is certain 
we can carry nothing out. And having 
food and raiment, let us be therewith 
content. Very true, brethren, but strictly 
speaking we cannot say that, thai pre acher 
who works hard to support his family, and 
then cannot do it without always being in 
debt does have food and raiment. Think 
on it, brethren, to see if these things be 
so. 

The minister of God, brethren, will 
preach without all this; but this do^s not 
discharge your duty towards him. Yes, 
brethren, the ministers of God are governed 
be the sune rule as the apostles, see Acis, 
20 c. 33, 34 v. I have coveted no man's 
silver, or gold, or apparel. Yea, you 
yourselves know, that these hands have 
ministered unto my necessities, and to them 
that were with me. We see that the apos- 
tle Paul did not covet these tilings, al- 
though he writes to the churches and tells 
them their duty to their preachers; and 
we have snid and now say, he will 
preach whether he gets them or not. 
And the reason is r a dispensation of the 
gospel is committed to iheir charge, see 1 
Corinthians, 9 c. 16, 17 v. For though I 
preach the gospel, I have nothing to glory 
of: for necessity is laid upon me; yea wo 
is unto me it I preach not the gospel. For 
if 1 do this thing willingly, I have a reward; 
but if against my will, a dispensation of 
the gospel is committed unto me. Here 
we see that they preach, and that 1o get 
clear of a wo, and willingly too; and look 
in the same chapter and you will see it is 
without charge. 

We are again reminded of the limits of 
our letter, and we will close in the language 
of holy writ. Philippians, 4 c. 8 v. 
Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are 
true, whatsoever things are honest, 
whatsoever things are just, whatsoev- 
er things are pure, whatsoever things 



are lovely, whatsoever things are of good 
report; if there be any virtue, and if 
there be any praise, think on these things. 
2 Peter, 3 c. 17, 18 v. Ye, therefore, be- 
loved, seeing ye know these things before, 
beware lest ye also, being lead away with 



the error of the wicked, fall from your 
steadfastness. But grow in grace, and in 
the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour 
Jesus Christ. To him be glory, both now 
and forever. Amen. 

Tarburo J Press,, 



MlftUTES OF THE TEffTH A JXVAJL §E8SION QW T2EE 

Contcntnea Baptist Association, 

leld at Pleasant Hill m. h. Edgecombe, county, N C 23, 24, and 25 OcPr, 1S40. 



FRIDAY, Oct. 23. 

The introductory discourse was deliver- 
ed, according to appointment, by Elder 
James Griffin, from Gal. iii. 29: And if ye 
be Christ's, then are ye Abraham's seed, 
and heirs according to the promise. 

The delegate* assembled, and after pray- 
er, chose Eiders, Thomas Dupree, .Mode- 
rator; Mark Bennett, Clerk; and Benja- 
min Bynum, Assistant Clerk: and breth- 
ren Sherrod Tison and Turner Bynum a 
committee on finance, to report on Satur- 
day. 

Corresponding messengers, and minis- 
ters from corresponding Associations, were 
invited to sit with us. Elder Stephen I. 



Chandler, brethren, Lewis Daniel, arid A«a 
Brooks, from the Country Line, bearing a 
file of their Minutes; Elder James K. Bar- 
bour and brother Moore Stephenson, from 
the Little River, bearing Minutes from 
their body; Eiders, John H. Daniel and 
Biount Cooper, and brethren, Richard 
Harrison, John Bryan, and Wm. Thigpen, 
from Kehukee, bearing Minutes; and El- 
der Samuel Hoult from White Oak, bring- 
ing a certificate of his appointment, and 
Minutes; came forward and took seats 
with us. 

Letters from the churches were received 
and read, and their contents, as far as re- 
quired, marked as in the following tabic: 



» 



Churches and counties 
wherein situatedi 



NAMES OF THE DELEGATES. 



Autrey's Creek, Edgecombe, 
Beaver Dam, Lenoir,* 
Black Creek, Wayne. 
Galloway's, Pitt. 
Hancock's, Pith 
Meadow, Greene, 
Memorial, Wayne* 
Nauhunty, Wayne, 
Pleasant Hill, Edgecombe, 
Pleasant Plains, Way net 
Red Banks, Pitt. 
Sandy Bottom, Lenoir, 
Tison's, Pith 
Toisnot, Edgecombe, 
Town Creek, Edgecombe. 
Union, Edgecombe, 
White Oak, Edgecombe, 



John R. Moore, Wm. M.Crisp, S. Wooten, 

J* A. Barnes,* I. Lamb,* Arthur Barden, 
Noah Buck,* J. Haddock,* S, Corbin,* 
Jno- Smith,* D. Wilson, Ji McGermau, 
Benj. Bymum, Jos. Bynum, Wm. Williams 
W, Bass, Elisha Holland,* 
Shad, Pate, W. Taylor, Silas Pate, 
Jacob Proctor, Fr. Proctor, Sol. Braswell, 
Joel Hines,* W. Smith, Alfred Ellis,* 
Jasi Griffin, Laneir Griffin, Caleb Nelson, 
Richard Rouse, Evans Whaley, 
Samuel Moore, L. P. Beardsley,*S. Tison, 
Moses Farmer, Wm. Woodard, L. Dew,* 
Thosi Dupree, Turner Bynum, M. Bennett, 
Ai Whitehead, Mi Whitehead, Jona. Bailey, 
Ichabod Moore, A. Eason, Jona. Ellis, 
* Not represented: butmarked as last year. 
* Those marked * were absent. 



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2 


00 


1 


00 


I 


00 


1 


5l> 


o 


50 


o 


00 


i 


50 



22 40 



Petitionary letters were enquired for. 

The Circular Letter was handed in, read, 
and referred to a committee, consisting of 
S. I. Chandler, B. Cooper, and M. Ben- 
nett, and that they report on Saturday. 

The next session is appointed to be 
at TISON'S MEETING KOUSE, Pitt 
county, to commence Friday before the 
fourth Sunday in Oct. 1841. Elder Ben- 
jamin Bynum is appointed to preach the 
introductory sermon; and upon his failing 
to do so, Elder Ichabod Moore. Worship 
to begin at 1 1 o'clock, A. M. 



Appointed Elder Mark Bennett to write 
a Circular Letter to accompany the Min- 
utes of the next session. 

Adjourned to 10 o'clock, A. M. on Sat- 
urday. 

SATURDAY, Oct. 24. 

Met pursuant to adjournment. 

The list was called, and absent delegates 
noted. 

The Constitution and Rules of Decorum 
were read. 

Elders, Chandler and Lawrence, and in 
case of failure, Elder Cooner, were an- 



poinded to preach on the Sabbath; to begin 
'worship at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

Appointed messengers to attend sister 
Associations, To Kehukee, Elders, Icha- 
bod Moore; Samuel Moore, and bro- 
tSier Sherrod Tison, and by them 
40 copies of these Minutes. To White 
Oak, Elder Benjamin Bynum, brethren 
Wright Smith, and John R. Moore, with 
15 copies Minutes. To Little River, El- 
ders, Benjamin Bynum & Ichabod Moore, 
with 20 copies. To Country Line and Ab- 
bott's Creek Union, Elders, James Griffin, 
Benjamin Bynum. and brethren, Jonathan 
Ellis and Sherrod Tison, with 20 copies to 
each. 

The committee on finance reported: 

Balance remaining in Treasury, Octi 1839, $11 88 
Contributions at this Association, 22 40 

$34 28 
Paid for printing this year's Minutes, 15 00 

Now remaining in Treasury, Oct. 1840, $19 28 
SHERROD TISON,? r 
TURNER BYNUM, 5 m ' 

The committee on the Circular Letter 
reported favorably to its publication. The 
report was concurred in. 

Appointed Elder Mark Bennett to pre- 
pare these Minutes for the press; to hove 
400 copies printed and distributed as usual; 
and to transcribe one copy into the Asso- 
ciation book. 

The Minutes were rend, and subscribed 
by the Moderator and Clerk. 

Adjourned to the time and place of next 
annual session. 

THOMAS DUPREE, Md. 

Mark Bennett, Clk. 

SUNDAY, Oct. 5. 

A large assembly met, and Elder Blount 
Cooper preached from Rev. xxii. 17: The 
Spirit and the bride say, Come. And lot 
him that heart th say, Come. And let him 
that is athirst, come: and whosoever will, 
let him take the water of life freely. Ei- 
der Stephen I. Chandler preached from 
Rev. xxi. and lat'er clause of 9 verse: 
Come hither, I will show thee the bride, 
the Lamb's wife. Elder VV 



concluded by 



singing, 



exhortation and 



prayer. 'The word spoken was as the ora- 
cles of God; strict attention was .given; 
saints were edified; and we can only hope 
and pray that it may prove to have been 
seed sown in a goad soil. Sovereign of 
grace, thy kingdom come. 



CIRCULAR tiEJPTTEIk 
To the Churches we represent. 

Beloved Brethren: We shall lay be- 
fore you some remarks on 

CHURCH DISCIPLINE. 

1st, If thy brother shall trespass against 
thee, go and tell him his fault between thee 
& him aione; if he shall hear thee, thou hast 
gained thy brother, (the matter is to be at 
an end.) But if he will not hear thee, 
then take with thee one or two more, that 
in the mouth of two or three witnesses ev- 
ery word may be established; (if he hears 
them thedifficulty is settled. And if he shall 
negieet to hear them, (then ready for the 
church,) tell itunto the church: but if he 
neglect to hear the church, let him be un- 
to thee as a heathen man and a publican. 
(Matt. IS c. 15, 16 and 17 vs.) This is the 
sacred criterion; but how often is it the case, 
that the scriptures are forgotten or unatten- 
ded to; a difficulty takes place, or is dug up, 
between brethren and in many instances in- 
stead of taking the scripture rule, the broth- 
er that a fault is lodged against by his broth- 
er, the pretended aggrieved brother goes 
and tells it to the known enemies of the 
brother first, and then to the world, or to 
his party among the world, and from such 
procedure the thing is magnified until, if it 
ends at all, it is in expulsion from the 
church, (if not almost in the church's 
overthrow,) while malicious feelings ap- 
pear to be cherished in many. Do not be 
surprised, brethren, at our making use ot 
the word party above, for there were par- 
ty religionists before the year 1S40. 

But as the limits of a Circular will nof 
admit of our bringing forward all the tes- 
timony we could, to prove our assertions 
on this point, we will give you one or two 
from the New Testament. GalatianSj 
3rd and 1st: 0, foolish Galatians, whe 
hath bewitched you that ye should not 
obey the truth, before whose eyes Jesus 
Christ hath been evidently set forth crucr 
tied among you. In consequence of those 
teachers that had come among those breth- 
ren with something like another gospel, 
(though Paul told them there be not anoth- 
er,) it had the tendency to make a party, 
as you may see from the same epistle, iv. 
15, 16: For I bear you record, that if it 
had ieen possible ye would have plucked 
out "ft ur own eyes, and have given them 
to me. Am 1 therefore become youi 
enemy, because I tell you the truth? It 



3 



is plain to be seen, that these had Deen the 
friends or pretended friends of the apostle; 
but inasmuch as he strictly adhered to the 
truth, this made it manifest that they now 
looked upon him, (or would have it so 
understood,) as their enemy. The same 
spirit, brethren, is yet in the world. And 
we know that in many instances where the 
missionaries have gone with their other 
gospel, it has made its party, and this tribe 
won't have the scriptures for their guide in 
doctrine nor discipline; notwithstanding 
for the most part they are the most offi- 
cious in hunting up allegations against those 
they claim as their brethren, and then 
to work they go. How? not to the scrip- 
tures for their guide, but to almost every 
body with a bright side for them, and a 
dark one on the side of the pretended ag- 
grieved 

Now, brethren, having gone this far, 
suffer us to go a little further. Some 
few years ago, it appears there were but 
few churches that knew how to proceed, 
or wiiat to do, with what are called 
missionary members. And as it may be 
the case that there are some -yet laboring 
under difficulty respecting this matter, 
we will lay before you the scriptures ap- 
propriate as we conceive, together with 
some remarks. Matthew, 16, 6: Take^ 
heed and beware of the leaven of the phari- 
sees and of the sadducees. And read a 
few verses below in the same chapter, and 
it will show that Jesas alluded to their 
doctrine, which was corrupt. Now it is, 
we think, very plain to almost all Chris- 
tians and nice observers, that the mission- 
aries hold unsound doctrine; therefore, be- 
ware of them, brethren, turn the whole 
gang out of your churches. Some per- 
haps will say we are too harsh, see Luke, 
12. 1: Beware of the leaven of the phari- 
sees, which is hypocrisy. Look at that. 
Does the church want hypocrisy in it? 
Certainly not. See Corinthians, i. 5, 6, 
after rehearsing over some reported things 
against them, and saying, deliver such an 
onetosatan for the destruction of the flesh, 
he does not think proper to stop yet, but 
says: Purge out, therefore, the old leaven 
that ye may be a new lump. Then is it 
not plain, if you keep up. a right discipline 
in your churches, (which in one sense is 
the life of religion) you must get rid of ail 
such. 

Next we come to notice church mem- 
bers that fail from time to time, to attend 
their meetings: which in these days, is too 



frequently the case with many. We ask, 
what is the matter? why some would say, 
I was too busy yesterday, or I had to go to 
such a public gathering to see such persons 
that it was much to my interest to see, and 
besides I hardly expected there would be 
any preacher there. Now that it is the 
duty of church members to attend their 
meetings, certainly none will deny, and 
that too whether there is any preacher or 
not; we give you the following scriptures: 
xMalachi, 3, 16: Then they that feared the 
Lord spake often one to another, Heb, 10. 
25: Not forsaking the assembling of our- 
selves together, as the manner of some is; 
but exhorting one another: and so much 
the more as ye see the day approaching. 

We must only touch at a few more 
things. All hereticks, brethren, that 
may come among y@u after the first and 
second admonition thou shalt reject: and 
here be sure to keep a strict watch, and act 
honest with yourselves and the cause of 
God. For we conceive there is nothing 
more dangerous to the cause of God and 
happiness of Christians, than for the chur-. 
ches to keep hugged up in them Arminian 
members, and especially Arminian prea- 
chers; through such the devil is sure to 
make many inroads upon the church. 
Where brethren get in debt to one anoth- 
er, the scripture forbids their going to law 
before the world, or unjust. 1st. Cor. 6.U, 
2, &c. If any man that is called a brother 
be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolator, 
or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extor- 
tioner, with such a one no not to eat. 1st 
Cor. 5. 11. We forbear remark further 
than to say, that a man is not to be guilty 
of all those things that the apostle has 
mentioned here which he looks at as ex- 
cluding crimes before he is criminal, no 
but if guilty of any one of them you are not 
to eat with him. 

Brethren, don't forbear to try to keep up 
a good or right discipline in your chur- 
ches, because you might have fears you 
would hurt some feelings. We fear in a 
great many instances feelings have been 
consulted, especially great men's, white 
consequences that have followed have 
been distressing. Then as the Saviour said, 
on a different occasion: Go, and sin no 
more. If we have heretofore sinned, or 
not done that, that was right, to the keep- 
ing up of a right discipline in our churches, 
let us endeavor not to do so any more. 

And now, as the apostle Paul said to 
Titus, 2. 11, 12: For the grace of God, 



thatbringeth salvation, hath appeared to 
all men teaching us, that denying ungod- 
liness and worldly lust, we should live so- 
berly, righteously, and godly, in this pre- 
sent world. May we, brethren, abun- 
dantly realise that grace, while here in 



this world, that we may walk uprightly all 
the days of our life, and in the world to 
which the righteous are tending, may we 
receive a crown of glory that fadeth not 
away. 



Tarboro' Press. 



cm 



ItltftUTES OF THE ELF/VERTl! ANKtl At SESSION OF THE 

Contentnea Baptist Association, 

Held at Tisons meeting house, Pitt county, N.C. 22, 23, 24 October, 1841. 



FRIDAY, Oct. 22. 

The Introductory Sermon wis delivered 
by Elder Benj. Bynum, from i Cor. xv. 
58: Therefore, my beloved brethren, be 
ye steadfast, immoveable, always abound- 
ing in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as 
ye know that your labor is not in vain in 
the Lord. 

The delegates assembled, and after pray- 
er, chose Elders Thomas Dupree Modera- 
lor, Mark Bennett Clerk, and Ber.j. By- 
num Assistant Clerk; and brethren Tur- 
ner Bynum and Wright Smith a commit 
tee on finance, to report on Saturday. 

Corresponding messengers and ministers 



from corresponding Associations were in- 
vited to seats with us. Eiders Wnt. Hy- 
man, Humphrey Stalliugs } Richard Rives, 
and Blount Cooper, from the Kehukee, 
wiih Minutes; P. Puckett from White 
Oak, with Minutes; R. Hensley from 
Country Line, bearing Minutes from his 
body, and two files from Abbott's Creek 
Union for 1S40, and 1841; and brother 
John Jones from Little River, came for- 
ward and took seats. 

Letters from the churches of our body 
Were called for, received, and read, and 
their contents, as required, marked as in 
the following table. 



Churches and counties 
wherein situated. 



NAMES 0£ THE DELEGATES. 



Autrey's Creek, Edgecombe, j 
Beaver Dam, Lenoir, 
Black Creek, Wayne, 
Galloway's, Pitt, 
Hancock's, Pitt, 
Meadow, Greene, 
Memorial, Wayne, 
Nauhunty, Wayne, 
Pleasant Hill, Edgecombe, 
Pleasant Plains, Wayne, 
Red Bank, Pitt, 
Sandy Bottom, Lenoir, 
Tison's, Pitt, 
Toisnot, Edgecombe, 
Town Creek, Edgecombe, 
Union, Edgecombe, 
White Oak, Edgecombe, 



a « a i «■?. ij r o> , £ ^ 
§ ■ R ■ k 1 ?; 3 9 , fc= § 



SU H F-l s 



John R. Moore, Stephen Wooten, JiOobbj* 
A.Jones,* Lofton Neathercut, J« Heath 
Wm. Bass, Isham Lamm,* A. Barden,' 

Henry Smith, John Smith,. Tames Wilson,* 

Benj. Bynum, Wm. Williams, A. Joyner 

Wright Bass, Elisha Holland, 

Wi Taylor, Shadrach Pate, isilas Pate,* 

Jacob Proctor, Fred. Proctor, S. Bras well,' 

Wright Smith, Joel Fines,* 

James Gritfia, C. Nelson, G. McGowns 

Richard Rouse, Evans Whaley,* 

Sam'l Moore, Benj Briley,ISherrodTison, 

Moses Farmer, L. Dew,* Wm. vVoodard,* 

Thos, Dupree,Turner Bynum, M.Bennett, 

M. Whitehead, A. Whitehead Jona. Bailey, 

Ichabod Moore, Sol'u Barnes, E.Howard, 

*Those marked thus * were absenti 



S-"* 

^'3' 



U? 



40; 

33 
44 

17 
18 
18 
39 
15 
11 
56 
14 
15 
41 
66 
48 
25 



1 00 
1 00 
1 50 

1 00 
I 50 
1 00 
1 00 
50 
50 
i 00 

50 

1 00 

1 50 

2 50 
1 50 
1 50 

18 50 



Petitionary letters were cailed for. 



Circular Letter to accompany the Minutei 



Called for the Circular Letter. It was | of the session of 1S43 



presented, and referred to a committee, 
consisting of Elders P. Puckett, Benj. By- 
num, Wm. Hyman, and Thomas Dupree, 
with request that they report to-morrow. 

The next session is appointed to be at 
Memorial, to commence F riday before the 
fourth Sabbath in October, 1S42. Eider 
Thomas Dupree is appointed to preach the 
Introductory Sermon; and Elder Mark 
Bennett, as an alternate: worship to begin 
at 11 o'clock, A. M. 



Requested Elder I, Moore to writs a clock, A. M. 



Adjourned to Saturday, 9£ o'clock, A. 

M. 

SATURDAY, Oct. 23. 

Met pursuant to adjournment. 

The list was called, and absent delegate 
noted. 

The Constitution and Rules of Decorum 
were read. 

Elders Hyman and P. Puckett, (Elder 
B. Cooper an alternate,) were appointed to 
preach on the Sabbath; to begin ftt 10 o% 



Appointed messenger! to attend sister 
Associations. Elders Duprce and Bennett 
and brother Jacob Proctor to Kehukee, 
with 40 copies of our Minutes present ses- 
sion j Elders B. Bynum, I. Moore, and 
Bennett & brethren Richard Rouse & Loft- 
on Neathercut to* White Oak with 15 copies 
these minutes; Elders I. Moore & Bennett 
and brother Wright Smith to Little River 
with 20 copies; Eiders B. Bynurn, J. Grif- 
fin and Bennett to Country Line and Ab 
bott's Creek Onion with 20 copies the»e 
Minutes to each. 

The committee on finance reported: 
Balance remaining in Treasury, Oct. 184i,$19 28 



Paid Clerk for last year's services* 



Contributions at this Association, 



fVid for printing this year's Minutes, $15 
Paid Clerk for this year's services, 6 



6 00 



SU&bAt, Oct. 24'. 
The Elders appointed to preach attended* 
and preached to a large assembly the gos- 
pel of Christ. Eider Hyman from i Tim. 
iv. 16: Take heed unto thyself, and unto 
the doctrine; continue in them: for in do- 
ing this thou shall both save thyself, and 
them that hear thee. The weather was fa- 
vorable, being clear and Calm, and people 
appeared to be attentive. 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 



18 50 



78 



Balance remaining in Treasury, Oct. 1841, $10 78 
WRIGHT SMITH, 



WRIGHT SMITH, } n 
TURNER BYNUM, 5 om " 
The committee on Circular Letter repor- 
ted, that they recommend the reading 
thereof, and also its publication with these 
Minutes. The report was concurred in. 

Quere. If the deacon of one church re- 
move his membership to another church, 
is he qualified to exercise the deacon's of- 



Selovsd Brethren: 

Our churches have been permitted to 
meet by representation the eleventh time' 
$13 28 since our present union was formed, and 
| to enjoy a comfortable and refreshing in- 
terview and a pleasant session; and to af- 
j ford us this one more evidence that the 
Lord has not yet removed the candle sticks 
oo I oul of their places. 

Although the almond tree is flourishing 
with by far the greater part of our Asso- 
ciation, and they soon will go to their long 
home, it is yet needful to exhort one an- 
other, and so much the more as we see 
that day approaching. And as the present 



$31 
00 
00 
— 21 



age of God's house must soon be removed 
to heaven, and be succeeded by our chil- 
dren and acquaintances who may derive 
great assistance and comfort from us it we 
leave in good order; for their sakes and the 



fice in the latter, provided she should mmual peace both of you and us, we will 
choose him for that purpose, without reor- 1 offer a few words on the subject of 
dination? Answer: Yes. n ^ 



Because the church and his own consent 
appointed him toaparticular church; but the 
Presbytery ordain him to the office at large. 

Resolved, that the name of the church 
Galloway's, be taken from the list of chur- 
ches in our body. 

Appointed Elder Bennett Treasurer; 
and also, to prepare these Minutes for the 
press, to have 400 copies printed and dis- 
tributed as usual; and to transcribe one co- 
py into the Association book. 

Resolved, that we appoint (he Saturday 
before third Sabbath in December to be 
set apart and observed as a day for fasting 
and prayer to our Heavenly Father, for a 
revival of religion, and for a supply of 
faithful ministers of the gospel. 

The Minutes were read and subscribed 
by the Moderator and Clerk. 

Adjourned to the time and place of the 
next annual session. 

THOMAS DUPREE, Moderator. 
MARK BENNETT, Clerk. 



Practical Godliness. 

Christians can, and do, err. If we sa;$r 
that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, 
and the truth is not in us. i John i. 3. How 
easily they are drawn into sin, the sacred 
scriptures and their own experience largely 
show, but neither the Lord's word nor past 
experience demonstrate the lengths and 
depths to which a saint may go, that is, 
how far he may step aside from gospel 
track; nor how many thousand causes are 
constantly in operation to divert his feet 
from the path of rectitude. 
®*'liy practical godliness, we mean, carry- 
ing out in our lives and deportment, ac- 
cording to their just sense, the ordinances 
and commandments of the Lord. And al- 
though it may seem at first view, difficult 
to divide properly between faith and prac- 
tice, yet by attention to the word of God it 
will be found both possible and necessary. 
What doth it profit, my brethren, though 
a man say be hath faith, and hath not works? 



s 



Can faith save him? James ii. 14. In this 
1ext the apostle makes a distinction, call 
ing the one faith, and the other works. 
The same apostle says, For as the hody 
without the spirit is dead, so faith without 
works is dead abo. James ii. 26. Ac- 
cording to this testimony it is worse than 
vain for us to advocate a living faith with- 
out 'correspondent works. And he is at 
best a foolish virgin whose conduct does 
not exhibit in the main a counterpart to 
the gospel of Jesus. Against the error of 
holding and defending a living and saving 
faith without its fruit and sure concomitant, 
practical piety, James has warned usagain: 
Yea, a man may say, Thou hast faith and 
I have works: show me thy faith without 
thy works, and I will show thee my faith 
by my works. But wilt thou know, 
vain man, that faith without works is dead? 
James ii. IS, 20. 

But possibly, some of us may feel con- 
tented with barely good works enough to 
evince a change oi' heart; and from neglect 
of duty we may have declined into world- 
ly mindedness, and from that into sinful 
indulgences, until our warmest zeal goes 
no farther than just to keep clear of such 
acts as would, if known, bring us under 
church censure. If so, we ought to piuse, \ 
reflect and read. Suppose we have faith: 
should any thing be added? Hearken! 
And besides this, giving all diligence, add 
to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowl- 
edge; and to knowledge temperance; and 
to temperance patience; and to patience 
godliness; and to godliness brotherly kind 
ness; and to brotherly kindness charity, ii. 
Pet. i. 5, 6, 7. Add virtue: to do unto all 
men as ye would they should do unto you, 
dealing justly in commerce, prudently in 
behaviour, cautiously in indulging, and 
blamelessly in enjoying. Add knowledge; 
grow in it as well as in grace; learn from 
the scriptures, — read them till you can re- 
member them, and remember till you can 
understand them. Do we know but little 
of that book of books? Can we read, 
and yet neither tell nor understand but lit- 
tle that is in it. Is it the strangest of all 
books to us, and to lie in the house merely 
to say we have a bible? Are we ignorant 
of its commands and of the duties it en- 
joins? And if so, is it not because that af- 
ter we have said in our public profession, 1 
go sir, we went not? Search the scrip- 
tures, is one of his commands, and do we 
gay we love him, and yet keep not his 
commandments? Add temperance: What 



large room, brethren, to add this grace! 
Add temperance, in speaking, in thinking, 
in judging, in acting, in laboring, in sleep- 
ing, in eating, and in drinking; and more 
particularly in the last named. The in- 
temperate use of spiritous liquors ha3 
done, and is vet doing, great evil; and it 
would he criminal to deny the mischievous 
effects of it among the churches at the pre- 
sent moment, and sinful in us not to speak 
plainly on the subject. There is no doubt 
of its benefits as a medicine to the sick, 
and sometimes to feeble constitutions; but 
it evidently was introduced into general 
and constant use as a luxury, — not as a ne- 
cessary artiele of subsistence, — but for 
pleasure altogether; and baptists or the 
saints of God should be cautious how they 
tamper with pleasure. It is only when 
we yield to the force of habit or the crav- 
ings of appetite, we insist that it was sent 
for a blessing; and we know that this argu- 
ment is used almost without exception by 
the intempeiate. Few need it only from 
habit; and whenever it becomes a necessa- 
ry article from habit, we have then got in- 
to a bad place, and we may not get out as 
well as we got in. Remember that he 
who uses it for pleasure can never tell 
where his pleasure will end. If when the 
usual hour of drinking arrives, we feel rest- 
less and uneasy till we get it, we have then 
passed the point of safety: and if once we 
venture to take it at an irregular hour, for 
fear we shall not get it at the stated period, 
or take a little larger drink because we 
think it the last opportunity we have then 
lost the only government, that can save us, 
humanly speaking: and if we can scarcely 
wait with patience at our churches till 
worship closes, or in conference till ad- 
journment, on account of thirst or craving 
for our grog, we then, in all probability 
shall never contribute farther in advancing 
the interests of the church or the glory of 
God. And if we would, before we leave 
the meeting ground, join the swearer and 
the openly profane, the vicious, the gam- 
bler, in taking a drink, either the church 
will relax the reins of discipline, or else, 
if that man lives long who thus acts, he 
will be expelled for excessive drinking. 
The light that is in the intemperate profes- 
sor cannot but be darkness. He is unpre- 
pared to iili any station well, or to glorify 
God declaratively in his body or spirit. 
He will prove himself the cross and ua» 
kind husband, the unnatural and unfeeling 
Cather, the cruel awl oppress!? • *s*ttr| ha 



W untMt tabt*g*ad neighbor or • good |ent, thy, cool and distant, or careless con 
citizen; he trill be irregular in his ittend 
ance at preaching, and drowsy and ind lifer- 
ent when present, wishing often the servi- 
ces were at an end. Should any of you 
admit the truth of what we here say, while 
you are sensible of having been excessive, 
tr fearful of becoming so, and yet feel that 
vou cannot forsake the use entirely, (which 
is the only remedy in all such qases ? ) you 
are already prepared to become a vic- 
tim to this Withering vice. We affection 
ately exhort you, brethren, to escape 
while you can; and count yourselves con- 
querors and happy when beyond its reach 
Count it or the use of it as the harpy of 
practical religion, and think not that you 
can see your danger so long a^ you use it. 
Learn from those who have been expelied 
or died iri misery and disgrace. They once 
thought as you now do, that they couid 
Use it without danger. For the sake of 
religion, and the happiness of many living 
and of many yet unborn, who will think 
What their fathers do is right, do not say to 
one another, brethren, drink on. 

Add patience. This is great'y needed 
wbth for happiness to ourselves, and light 
or example to others. Resl^essness and 
iletfuiness. murmuring ami repining, dis 



content, complaining, hastiness,, rashness, 
and disobedience aii follow impatience; 
and are contrary to the spirit of Chris"' and 
the gospel; b;id f«uit for a saint, and bod ex- 
amplt t > unbeliever?. If we submit pa- 
tiently »o no disagreeable providences, bus 
manifest Uneasiness and OppOsrnon o^spirit, 
we greatly mar the beauty of cftristiani'y. 
If we submit to no wrongs and injuries 
from the world nor b.e nren, but seek re- 
venge in ajl case*, we violate our Lord's 
commands, and conceal one of the most 
beautiful ornaments* of thegospei Ifyou 
are smitten on one cheek, lose )our cant a* 
law, or are compelled io go a mile with any 
onej suffer the injury to be repealed r-a'SVer 
than seek revenge. Bui if you are hasty 
to be ang y, inclined to deputation, or 
contention, give w*y to quarrel, indulge 
in abusing one, yield lo threatening 1 , ready 
to adopt » he wo Id's sense of honor, and 
even to fight, you exhibit little or none of 
the spirit of Christ or the gospel! 

Add godliness: Holiness of life in every 
shape but especially to discharge your obli- 
gations to God and to one another. iVLske 
it manifest that you love God, by rever- 
encing and obeying him. 

AaM brotherly kindness, ' "By '!q differ* 



duct to each other, brethren dampen affec- 
tion, weaken the bonds of union, excite 
Jealousies, suspicions, evil surmisings, and 
evil speakings, but by uniform kindness all 
the opposiles. 

Add charity. The principle of which 
is strict union in the affection of the heart 
to God, and a correspondent feeling for 
men. Its fruit embraces all the train of 
kind offices which we perform for. the com- 
fort, assistance, relief, and, in a word, the 
happiness of our fellow creatures. It is 
greater than faith or hope; for the two lat- 
ter only affect ourselves this side the grave, 
but charity extends from us to others, and 
lives beyond lime. It edifies ourselves 
and others, is the end of the commandment, 
is to be follovyed after, suffereth long, is 
kind, envieth not, vaunteth not itself, is 
not puffed up, does not behave unseemly, 
covers the multitude of sins, seeks not her 
own, is not easily provoked, thinks no evil, 
rejoices not in iniquity, but rejoices in the 
truih; beareth all things, believeth all 
things, hopeth all things, endurethallthings; 
never faileth. Look to it, brethren; we 
profess td be the people. It is a principle 
ov a grace not likely to be possessed with- 
out showing i self in all the above forms; 
and if we do no! exhibit the true character 
drawn by inspiration, we had better never 
professed it, — perhaps, had better never 
heard of it. Without this grace we are 
but doomed to repeat ihe cry, Our lamps 
are gone out. Examine your vessels; if 
your course of lite generally is that of char- 
ity, your vessels are supplied. 

Ifyou have young ministers of the gos- 
pel, who may eir hi knowledge or doctrine, 
faithfully expound unto them the way of 
ttie Lord more perfectly': and when either 
old or young are faithful to their trust, 
•himk it not a hardship lo esteem them 
highly for their work's sake; and be care-? 
fui to discharge your duty as churches to 
them. And you who are pastors or 
preachers think il not a small charge which 
is eommiited lo your trust. And remeni- 
ber that a dozen teai ful exhortations from 
you may not he sufficient to repair the mis- 
chief done by one Dad .example. Take no, 
active' pari in politics; it will hobble your 
feet, and detract from the sacredness of 
your holy office, weaken the bands of 
broiherhood, and risk circumscribing your 
usefulness. 

Be sure to keep up s'rict and scriptural 
discipline, in aii the churches. Let no 



personal and individual variances or dis- 
putes come into the church, until the par- 
ties may have taken the steps prescribed in 
Matt, xviii. 15 — 17. And let no public 
offence or abomination committed by a 
member, pa?s unnoticed; and be sure to 
specify charges, and specify truly and cor- 
rectly. If the member of one church see 
this in the member of another, take the ear- 
liest opportunity to inform his respective 
church. If you neglect to do so from fear 
of creating prejudice against yourself, you 
then become partaker of his offence, and 
aid in injuring the cause of religion. The 
sooner you, take hold of disorder to correct 
it, the better it. will be. Be punctual in 
attending your slated meetings, whether 
you have a preacher or not; and talk and 
sing and pray together. Are any of you 
without a pastor, pray ye the Lord of the 
harvest that he will send forth laborers in- 
to his harvest. Should a member of the 
church craye a letter of dismission, and 
the church know the reason thereof to be a 
want of fellowship with the said church, or 
with any member thereof, it would not be 
orderly to grant the petitioner a letter in 
fyll fellowship; neither to grant such letter 
to a member or person for whom the church 
baa not fellowship. And for as much as 
no member should leave the fellowship of 
the church to be from among disorder, but 
Stay to the last and try to keep disorder 
out of the church, therefore any person so 
getting a letter is guilty of disorder. And 
bear it constantly in mind that a member 
holding a letter under such circumstances 
has not in any wise transferred nor removed 
hjs membership, but stands in all respects 
a member of the church whence he obtain- 
ed bis letter, and is as much bound to attend 
conference and discharge all other duties to 
t^e churchy as if he had no letter, until he 
shall have handed it to another church and 
have been received and acknovyledged a 
member of the latter. Hence, the church 
who grants a letter of dismission is as much 
bound to watch over the ciismissed mem- 
ber for good, and to call him to account be- 
fore her for any disorder, as though she 
had given no dismission. If one member 
bring a charge against another, give a pa- 
tient investigation of such charge, before 
you take up any thing else. If the charge 
fail to be established, then lake up the case 
of the accuser, if he be thought worthy of 
censure. In the event that two or more 
members should be expelled for disagree- 
ment between themselves, either one may 



be restored to fe-llowship'Upon such confea 
sion as will satisfy all the church, even 
though the expelled members should not 
be reconciled with each other. If a mem- 
ber abruptly withdraw himself from the 
fellowship of any church without a letter of 
dismission, and through disaffection to the 
church, the sentence of expulsion should 
he pronounced against him by said church. 
If she does not so act, she must stand as 
worthy of his censure, and guilty of such 
disorder as he may have charged her with 
having committed. We would recom- 
mend the churches throughout, at every 
meeting to have the proceedings of each 
preceding conference reacj. Treat excorn-; 
municated persons with kindness. 

One of the highest duties and best tests 
of true Christianity is good orderly conduct 
at home among one's own family. The 
kind husband or wife, the tender father or 
mother, the affectionate brother or sister, 
the feeling and reasonable master or mis* 
tress, the peaceable and friendly neighbor, 
the quiet and loyal citizen, the constant, 
faithful, pious, meek and humble worship- 
er, is the character of a christian at home; 
and such should we all unceasingly endea- 
vor to fill, or else scarcely claim the name. 
It is not enough to confess our remissness; 
and short comings, and carelessly continue 
in our sloth and neglect; this is shamefully 
wrong: but we should cease to do evil, and 
learn to do well; to live to him who died 
for us, and to glorify him in our body and 
spirit, which are his. 

Be punctual in your promises, true to 
your word, cautious in speaking, humble 
in your walk, meek in behaviour, and 
modest and unassuming in all your deport- 
ment. — Keep the sabbath very sacred; it 
is feared that this day is too much unhal- 
lowed and violated by professors of reli- 
gion. The profaning of it has a demoraliz- 
ing effect on civil as well as religious socie- 
ty. — All by-words and light speeches have 
a bad effect, and taking the Lord's name in 
vain does much harm. — Coyetousness too 
vyill deaden every christian virtue. — Evil 
speaking will eat like a cancer. — Ridicul- 
ing, reproaching, and abusing people, eith- 
er your neighbors or others, will change 
all your greenness as trees of righteousness. 
— Neglect not to pray in your families. — 
Go to meeting or to preaching on every 
sabbath if you can. And when you go, if 
you sit out of doors, eagerly talking about 
the world's affairs till the minute worship 
begins, or, after going into the house, in- 



treduce such topics there you will pour 
cold water on your preacher's head, and 
deadness into your own feelings. — It is not 
right to let our children ramble and fish or 
hunt on the sabbath: this is not biinging 
them up in the nurture and admonition of 
the Lord. — As much as in you lieth, live 
in peace with all men. — Pray for the pros- 
perity of Zion. Pray without ceasing. 



and give thanks in every thing. — Quench 
not the spirit. — We hope a refreshing lime 
from the Lord's presence is not far off. Be 
as those who wait for their Lord's coming. 
Finally, Brethren, farewell. Live in 
peace; and the God of peace shall he with 
vou. To him be glory now and ever. 
Amen, 

Tarborq' fr&Si 









rUTHwri <iji 'iijKiHi 



"•.•.'• 



i 






f si 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



TWELFTH JUrJVUJlIi SESSION 



OF THE 

Contentnea Baptist Association, 

RELD AT 

Memorial, Wayne County, JY. €« 

21, 22, 23 Oct. 1842. 



FRIDAY, Oct. 21. quested them to report in the afternoon, 
Pursuant to adjournment of 1841, the same day 



introductory sermon was deliverer! by E! 
der Thomas Dupree. from Matthew 1 21 
Thou shall call his name JESUS: for 
he shall save his people from their 
sins. 

The delegates assembled, and after praise 

and prayer, chose Elder Thomas Dupree 

Moderator; Mark Bennett '!erk;and Ben 

jamin Bynum clerk assistant 

Oho^e brethren. Wright. Smith and Lnr- 

ry Dew, a committee of finance, and re 



Corresponding messengers and ministers 
from sister Associations were invited to sit 
with us. Elders. Wm. Burns from Coun- 
try Line; George Nance, Eli Holland, 
James Sasser, and brother Robert Gully* 
from Little River; Elder Parham Pucketr^ 
from White Oak; and brother Robert D. 
Hart, from Kehukee took seats. 

The list of churches was called, and let- 
ters handed in, showing the state of the 
churches as follows: 



Names of churches, and 

counties wherein 

situated. 



NAMES OF THE DELEGATES. 



If 



Autrey's Creek, Edgecombe, 
Beaver Dam, Lenoir. 
Black Creek, Wayne, 
Hancock's, Pitt, 
Meadow, Greene, 
Memorial, Wayne, 
Nauhunty, Wayne, 



Red Banks, Pitt, 
Sandy Bottom, Lenoir, 
Tison's. Pitt, 
Toisnot, Edgecombe, 
Town Creek, Edgecombe, 
Union. Edgxombe, 
White Oak, Edgecombe, 



S. Wooten, J. R, Moore, Wm. M. Crisp, j 
L. Williams, L, Nethercut, Aretas Jones,: 
Wm. Bass, Jas, A- Barnes, Isham Lamm,; 1 
H'y Smith, John Smith, Joel McGermon, j 
J. Beheman, Benj. Bynum, Aaron Joyner,' 
Tobias Jones, Wright Bass, E'a Holland.; 1 1 
John Smith, Shadraeh Pate, Jos. Gardner,; \ 2 

PleasantHill, Edgecombe, j F'k Procter,* SoPn Braswell, J. Procter,* 

Pleasant Plains, Wayne, j Wright Smith, - 

'Jas. Griffin, Laneir Griffin, Caleb Nelson, 
| Richard Rou3e, Evans Whaley,* 
Samuel Moore, Benjamin Briley, 1 

Moses Farmer, Larry Dew,Wm. Woodard, 1 
Thos, Dupree, J. C. Knight,* M. Bennett,; il 1 
M. Whitehead, A* Whitehead, J. Bailey,; 2 
J. B. Woodard, W. M. Stanton, I. Moore, 2; 1 
•Absent. 



&• gl SU g- "* 



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34 
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^Petitionary letters were inquired For. 

The Circular letter was called for, pre- 
sented, and referred to a committee consist- 
ing of brethren, Wright Smith, Benjamin 
Bynum, Thomas Dupree, Robert D. Hart, 
and Mark Bennett, with request that they 
report on Saturday. 

The next annual session of our body is 
appointed to be held at Meadow, Greene 
County; to commence Friday before the 
fourth" Sabbath in October, 1843; Elder 
John Smith to preach an introductory dis- 
course, or Elder James Griffin as alternate; 
worship to begin at tl o'clock, A. M. 

Correspondence from sister Associations 
was inquired for. Files of minutes and a 
letter were received from Kehukee; and 
minutes from White Oak, Little River and 
Abbots Creek Union. 

Messengers to attend sister Associations 
were appointed as follows: Elders, Thom- 
as Dupree, William Bass, James Griffin, 
M. Bennett to Kehukee, with 40 copies of 
our minutes: James Griffin, Benjamin By- 
num, John Smith and M. Bennett to White 
Oak, with 15 copies; B. Bynum, John 
Smith, and M Bennett to Little River, 
and the same to Country Line, Abbots 
Creek Union, with 20 copies minutes to 
each of the three latter bodies. 

The Committee of finance reported as 
follows: 

Balance in treasury, Oct. 1841, $10 78 
Paid Clerk for this year's services, 6 00 



Contributions at this session, 

In treasury, Oct. 1842, 

Paid for printing these Minutes, 



Balance in Treasury, 22 Oct. 1842, Si 7 OS 
Wright Smith*. 
Larry Dew, 

Appointed Elder M. Bennett Treasurer; 
ffnd also, to prepare these minutes for 
press, — to have 400 copies printed, and 
distributed as usual, and record one copy 
On the manuscript book. 

Adjourned with prayer to Saturday, 10 
o'clock A. M. 



4 


78 


20 


30 


25 


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8 


00 



Com. Fin 



SATURDAY, Oct. 22 

Met pursuant to adjournment, and open- 
ed with prayer. 

A letter from the White Oak Associa- 
tion was read and received. 

Elder D. J. Mott from the same body 
appeared, was invited, and took his seat 
with us. 

The list was called, and absentees mark- 
ed. 

The Committee on the circular reported, 
that, they thought it best not to publish it 

Elders. Burns and Nance, were appoint- 
ed to preach on Sabbath, Elder Puckett, as 
an alternate 

The minutes were read, assigned by the 
Moderator, and countersigned by the Clerk. 

Adjourned with prayer to the time and 
place above named 

THOMAS DUPREE, Moderator. 
Mark Bennett, Clerk. 

SABBATH, Oct. 23. 
Met at the stage at 10 o'clock. Elder 
Nance was confined with palpitation or 
fluttering at the heart, at the place where 
he lodged the night preceding. Elder 
Burns introduced the services by prayer 
and singing; and preached from Psalm 
xxxvii 39. But the salvation of the 
righteous is of the Lord; he is their 
strength in the time of trouble. Elder 
John Daniel, from Georgia, being present, 
was invited to preach, but he being fatig- 
ued and hoarse, declined the invitation; 
and Elder Pucket joined the congregation 
in a hymn, and preceded from Rom. L 16. 
For I am not ashamed of the gospel of 
Christ: for it is the power of God unto 
salvation to every one that believe tk; to 
the Jew first, and also to the Greek. 
Elder Mott joined the congregation in a 
hymn, and dismissed the assembly. Good 
order was preserved, and close attention 
given to the word. The services of that 
day, with all other true devotion, we earn- 
estly commend to him who alone can 
crown the planter and the waterer with in- 
crease; praying, with great desire, that he 
may grant us more spiritual mindedness 
and diligence^ and a revival of true reli- 
gion. Tarboro' Pressi~~ 



■ •■*. 



\* 



MINUTES 



--•.,-,...-- 



OF THE 



tHIRTEEWTH AJWrUJiZ, SESSION 



OF THE 



Contentn ea Baptist Jlssociation, 

Held at JfKvi&ow, Greene County, JY. C. 

On the 20, 21, 22 Oct. 1843. 



FRIDAY, October 20 and Ichabod Moore, Clerk; and Jesse C. 
The Introductory Sermon was deliv-j Knight, Assistant Clerk 
ered bv Rider Jame^ O^bourn, from Haiti j Chose Wright Smiih and Turner By* 
more, from Isaiah. 27 c 13 v.: And it jnum, a committpe of finance, 
shall come to pass in that day, that the! Corresponding messenger* and ministers 
great trumpet shall be blown; and they i from sister Associations, were invited to 
shall t'orap which were ready to perish intake seats with us, viz: Elders, lames Os- 
the land of Assyria, and the outcast in the j bourn, from Baltimore; losiah Smith, Par- 



land of Egypt, and shall worship the Lord 
in the holy mount, at Jerusalem. 

After which the delegates assembled and 
the A.«socistion wans opened by prayer. 
Chose Elder Thomas Dupree, Moderator; 



ham Pucke't, and John K. Bender, from 
White Oak; Ely Holland, James K 3ar- 
bee, and Justus Parish, from Little River. 
The list of churches was called, ami let- 
ters handed in, showing the state of the 
churches as follows: 



Names of churches, and 
counties wherein 
situated 



Autrey's Creek, Edgecombe, 
Beaver Dam, Lenoir, 
Black Creek, Wayne, 
Hancock's, Pitt, 
Meadow, Greene, 
Memorial, Wayne, 
Nauhunty, Wayne, 
Pleasant Hill, Edgecombe, 
Pleasant Plains, Wayne, 
Bed Banks, Pitt, 
Sandy Bottom, Lenoir, 
Tison's, Pitt, 
Toisnot, Edgecombe, 
Town Creek, Edgecombe, 
Union, Edgecombe, 
White Oak, Edgecombe, 
New Chapel, Wayne, 



NAMES OF THE DELEGATES, 



S. Wooten, J. R. Moore,* Wm. M. Crisp, 
Ai Jones, L. Williams,* L. Neathercut,* 
Wm. Bass, Linsy Bell, Abraham Lamb, 
Henry Smith,* John Smith,* Jas, Wilson, 
Benj. Bynum, Jos. Rasberry, W.Turnage, 
Wright Bass,* Washington Hooks,* 
Shad'h Pate, John Smith, Wright Taylor, 
Jacob Proctor, Fred. Proctor, Si Brasweil, 
Wright Smith, 

Jas. Griffin, Laneir Griffin, G. Magounds, 
Richard Rouse, Jesse Croom, Alex.Rouse, 
Samuel Moere, Benji Briley, W. Jones, 
Moses Farmer,* Wm.Woodard,*L. Dew,* 
Thos. Dupree, T. Bynum, J. C. Knight, 
M. Whitehead, J. Bailey, N. Taylor, 
S. Barnes, W. M. Stanton, Ichabod Moore, 
Hamilton Howel, 

•Absent. 



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Petitionary letters were caTled for. Bro 
ther Hamilton Ho-vel handed in one from 
Nev p rrt, Waj ne. After examination, 
they were found orthodox, and the Mode 
rator gave them the light hand of fellow- 
ship, in token of reception into our Asso 
ciat<on 

Appointed our next annual meeting to 
be held with the church at Beaver Dam, 
Lenoir county, to commenre Friday before 
the4sh Lord's d;>y in October. 1844, at 
11 o'clock. Elder James Griffin to preach 
the Introductory Sermon, and if he tail, 
Elder John Smith. 

Appointed brother Ichabod Moore to 
write a Circular Letter, to be printed with 
our next Minutes. 

Then adjourned till to-mbrrow 10 o' 
clock. 

SATURDAY, Oct 21st 

Met pursuant to adjournment from yes- 
terday, and the Association was openeo 
with prayer and praise by Elder Griffin; 
after which, Mark Bennett, the former 
Clerk came forward and handed in the As- 
sociation books; and brethren Turner By- 
num and Wright Smith, were appointed to 
settle with him- 

Called for Corresponding Letters from 
sister Associations. Brother J. K. Ben- 
der handed in one from white Oak, with a 
file of their Minutes; bro Ely Holland, 
from Little River, also handed in a tetter 
with a file of their Minutes Received a 
file of Minutes from the Country Line As 
sociation, also aeceived a file of Minutes 
with a letter from the Kehukee Associa- 
tion. 

The list was called & absentees marked. 

Appointed messengers to sister Associa- 
tions, Brethren, Jesse C, Knight, Jacob 
Proctor, and Elder Ichabod Moore, to Ke 
hukee: brethren, Elder John Smith Are- 
tas Jones and Richard Rr>use. to While 
O^k; brethren, Elder Benjamin Bynum 
Elder William Bass, and Shadrach Pate, to 
Li'tle River; brethren. Elder Benjamin 
Bynum and Wright Smith, to the Country 
Line and Abbott's Creek Union, Associa- 
tions. 

Appointed Elder Ichabod Moore, Trea- 
surer; also, to prepare the Minutes for the 
press, to have 400 copies printed and dis 
tribmed as usual, and record one copy on 
the manuscript book. 

Treasury Report-^ 



RecM front on* former Treasurer, 
Contributions this year,. 



Paid Mark Bennett for a book for 
the use of this Association, 



$17 
18 



OS 

SO 



$35 SS 



ss 



Balance in Treasury, Oct. 21 1843, $35 50 
Paid for printing these Minutes, 10 00 



Now in the Treasury, $25 50 

Appoinfe I ministers to preach to-mor- 
row: brethren, Parham Puckett and James 
Osbourn; and if either fail, JosiahSmftr*. 

Agreed to print with theee Minutes, the 
Constitution, or Form of Government; and 
Rules of Decorum. 

The Minutes were then read and ass ; gn« 
ed by order of the Moderator, and coun- 
tersigned by the Clerk. 

Adjourned with prayer to the time and 
place above named. 

THOMAS DUPREE, Moderator. 
ICHABOD MOORE. Clerk 

SUNDAY, Oct. 22nd. 
Met at the stage at 10 o'clock. Eider 
Puckett introduced the worship of ihe day 
from Eph siansthe 3rd and 8 v.: Unto me 
who am less than the least 'of all saints is 
this grace given, that I should preach 
among the Gentiles the unsearchable rich- 
er of Christ Brother James O&bourn fol- 
lowed from Solomon's Songs. 4 c 12 v,: 
A garden enclosed is my sister, my spouse; 
a spring shut up, a fountain sealed The 
meeting w 7 as then dismissed in good order, 
and (we hope) the brethren preached as of 
the ability that God givetb; and we also 
hope he will crown the meeting with a di- 
vine blessing. 

THE CONSTITUTION, 
Or, Form ojf Government of the Con* 

tentnea Baptist •Association- 
From a long series of experience, We, 
the churches of Jesus Christ, being regular- 
ly baptized upon the profession of our faith 
in i hrist, are convinced of the necessity of 
a combination of churches, in order to per- 
petuate a union and communion amongst 
us, and preserve and maintain a correspon- 
dence with each other in our union: Wo 
therefore propose to maintain and keep the 
order and rules of an Association, accord- 
ing to the following Plan, or Form .>f Gov- 
ernment, viz: 



Article I. The Association shall be com 
posed of members chosen bv the^/Kffere/nt 
ehurehes in our union, and duly sent to re 
present them in the Association, who shall 
be members, whom they judge best quali- 
fies fortha' purpose, and. producing letters 
from their respective churches, certifying 
their appointment, shall be entitled to a 
seat: Provided, they shall not violate the 
tule* further laid down in this Constitution. 

Art 2 In the letters from the different 
churches, shall be expressed, their number 
In full fellowship, those baptized, received 
by !e;ie»\ dismissed by letter, excommuni- 
cate-!, and de?d, si ce our las* Association 

Art. 3 The members thus chosen. and 
convened, shall have no pow er to lord* it 
over f^d's heritage — nor shall they have 
any ecclesiastical power over (he churches; 
nor shall they infringe any of the internal 
rights of any church in the union. 

Art. 4. The Association when convened, 
shall be governed and ruled by a regular 
and proper decorum. 

Ari 5. The Association shall have a 
Moderator and Clerk, who shall be chosen 
by the suffrage of the members present. 

Art. 6 New churches may be admitted 
into this union, who shall petition by letter 
vtm\ delegates — a^d upon examination, (if 
found orthodox efad orderly,") shall be re- 
ceived by 'he Association, and manifested 
by the Moderator, giving the delegates the 
right hand of fellowship. 

Art 7 Every church in the union shall 
be entitled to representation in this Associ- 
ation, but. shall have only three members 
from each church. 

Art. 8. Every query presented by any 
member in the Association shall be twice 
read: and before it be debated, the Mode 
rator shall put it to vote; and if there be a 
majority for its being debated, it shall be 
taken into consideration, and be delibera- 
ted; but if there be a majority against it, 
it shall be withdrawn. 

Art 9 Every motion made and second- 
ed, shall come under the consideration of 
the Association, except it be withdrawn 
by the member who made it 

An io The Association shall endea- 
vor to turnish the churches with the Min 
utFS of the Association. The best method 
for effecting that purpose shall be at the dis- 
cretion of the Association. 

Art H, We think it absolutely neces- 
sary hat we should have an Association 
fund, for defraying the expenses of the 
Same; for the raising and supporting of 



vhich, we think it the duty of each church 
in die union, tri contribute voluntarijv such 
sums as they shaii think proper, and send 
by 'he hands of their delegates <o the As- 
sociation; and those monies thus contribu- 
ted by the churches and received by the 
Association, shall be deposited in the ha>ds 
of a Treasurer, by the Association who 
shall be accountable to the Association for 
all monies by him received, and paid oul 
according to the direction of the Associa- 
tion 

Art \%. The Minutes of the Associa- 
tion, vvhen printed, shall be regular I v filed 
by the Clerk, and the book by h<m shall 
be kept for the usr of she Association, and 
he shall endeavor to have said boo(< pre- 
sent at each Association. 

Art 13. The Minutes of the Associa- 
tion shall be read, (and corrected, if need 
be,) and signed by the Moderator and 
Clerk before the Association rises. 

Art. 14. Amendments to this Plan, or 
Form of Government, may be made a? any 
time by the majority of the union, when 
they may deem it necessary. 

Art. 15. The Association shall have 
power — 

1. To provide for the general union of the 

churches. 

2. To preserve inviolably a chain of com- 

munion amongst the churches. 

3 To give the churches all necessary ad- 
vice in matters of difficulty. 

4 To inquire into the cause why the 
churches fail to represent themselves at 
any time in the Association. 

5. To appropriate those monies by the 
churches contributed for an Association 
fund, to any purpose strictly connected 
with the business of this Association. 

6. To appoint any member or members, 
by and with his or their consent, to 
transact any business which they may 
see necessary. 

7 The Association shall have power to 
withdraw from any church in this union, 
which violate the rules of this Associa- 
tion, or deviate from the orthodox prin- 
ciples of religion. 

8. To admit any of the distant brethren in 
the ministry as assistants, who may be 
present at. the time of their sitting, 
whom they shall judge necessary. 

9. The Association shall have power to 
adjourn themselves to any future time or 

„phce they may think most convenient 
to thu churches in the union. 
Art. 16. We will not hold in our chur- 



ifoes any member who is in the practice of 
visiting the Masonic Lodges; or who, on 
.any occasion, conforms to their custom of 
parade; nor will we countenance any 
such individual, who may reside or come 
among us, in the character of a preacher. 

Art 17. We will not countenance any 
preacher who shall travel within the 
bounds of our Association, establishing so 
cieties for the collection of money, or who 
may himself be collecting money to sup- 
port any institution whatever. We will 
not fellowship any member or members of 
Missionary, Bible, Tract, or Sunday School 
Union, Societies, nor advocates of Theolo- 
gical Schools, nor any person who does 
fellowship them, nor will we hold any 
fuch in our churches. 



RULES OF DECORUM. 

Art I. The Association shall be opened 
and closed by prayer. 

Art 2. The Moderator and Clerk shall 
be chosen by the suffrages of the members 
present 

Art 3. Only one person shall speak at 
a time, who shall rise from his seat and ad- 
dress the Moderator, when he is about to 
make his speech. 

Art 4. The person thus speaking shall 
not be interrupted in his speech by any ex- 
cept the Moderator, till he is done speaking. 

Art. 5 He shall strictly adhere to the 
flubject, and in no »#ise reflect on th^ pe - 
son who spoke before, so as to make re- 
marks on his slips, failings, or imperfect 



lions, but shall fairly state the cane and 
matter as near as he can, so as to convey 
his Sight or ideas 

Art. 6. No person shall abruptly hreak 
off or absent, himself from the Association 
without liberty obtained from it. 

Art, 7. No person shall rise and speak 
more than three times to one subject, with* 
out liberty from the Association. 

Art. 8. No member of the Association 
shall have liberty of laughing during the 
sitting of the same,- nor of whispering in. 
the time of a public ipeech. 

Art. 9. No member of the Association 
shall address another in any other terms of 
appellations than that of brother. 

Art 10. The Moderator shall not inter* 
rupt any member in, or prohibit him from, 
speaking, till he gives his light on the sub* 
ject, except he break the Rules of this De- 
corum. 

Art. 11. The names of the several mem- 
bers of the Association shall be enrolled by 
the Clerk, and called over as often as the 
Association requires. 

Art. 12. The Moderator shall be the last 
person who shall speak to the subject, who 
may give his opinion if he please before he 
puts the matter to a vote; but shall have no 
vote himself, unless the Association be 
equally divided 

Art, 13 Any member who shall will- 
ingly and knowingly break any of these 
rules, shall be reproved by the Association 
as they may think proper 

Tarboro 1 WeS 



MINUTES 

OF THE 
OF THE 

Conteninea Baptist Association j 

Held at Beaver Basil, Lenoir Coimf y, IV. C 

On ilk 25, 26, mid 27 days of October, 1844/ 



FRIDAY, October 25. 
( Pursuant to adjournment from last year, 
Elder James Griffin preached the Intro- 
ductory Sermon from Solomon's Songs, 
4 c. 12 v.: "A: garden enclosed is my sis- 
ter, my spouse: A spring shut up, a foun- 
tain sealed." 

The delegates met together and the As- 
sociation was opened by prayer; after 
which, they chose Elder Benjamin By- 
num. Moderator, and Ichabod Moore, 
Clerk, and Jesse C. Knight, Assistant 
Clerk. Chose brethren John Smith and 
Wright Smith a committee on finance. 



Corresponding ministers and messen- 
gers from sister Associations were inyited 
to. take seats with us. Brother William 
Thigpen from Kehnkee, with a, file of their 
Minutes; also, brethren from White Oai£ ? 
Josiah Smith, Edward Cox, and William 
Harper, with a file of their Minutes; .aispg 
brother Kimmons Barber, from the Little 
River, with a file of their Minutes; and 
brother James Osbourn, from Baltimore, 
took seats with us. 

The letters from the churches were 
called for and their contents inserted in 
the following table. 



Names of Churches, 
counties wherein 
situated i 



and 



Autrey's Cieek, Edgecombe, 
Beaver Dam, Lenoir ; 
Black Creek, Wayne, 
Hancock's,,^/, 
Meadow, Greene, 
Memorial, Wayne, 
Nauhunta, Wayne, 
Newport Chapel, Wayne, 
Pleasant Hill, Edgecombe, 
Pleasant Plains, Wayne, 
Red Banks, Pitt, 
Sandy Bottom, Lenoir, 
Tison's, Pitt, 
Toisnot, Edgecombe, 
Town Creek, Edgecombe, 
Union, Edgecombe, 
White Oak, Edgecombe, 



NAMES OF THE DELEGATES. 



John R Moore, S Wooten,* M M Crisp,* 
Parham. Pucket, John Heath, S M Turner, 
Wm Bass, Linsy Bell, Abraham Lamb," 
John Smith, Joel McCerman, D Wilson,* 
Benj Bynnm, Jas Beeman, Win Williams,* 
Wash'n Hooks, W right. Bass,. M Radford,* 
John Smith, Shadrach Pate,* Leonard Pate* 
Thomas Price,* Saunders P. Cox,* 
WmPearce,* Elzy Taylor, SoPnBraswell,* 
Wright Smith, 

JamesGriffin, Geo McGownds,* C Nelson, 
Jos R Cronm, Evans Whaley, A S Rouse, 
Samuel Moore,* Benjamin Corey,* 
Moses Farmer, WmWoodard,* LarryDew* 
Jesse C Knight, ThoDupree,* W Fleming* 
Newton Taylor, K Edwards, Ely Robbins, 
Ichabod Moore, W M Stanton, D Daniel, 
*Absent. 



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41 
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26 
21 


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17 

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A 



Petitionary letters called for. None 
present 

Appointed our next Association to be 
held with the church at Nauhunta, Wayne 
county, N. C, to commence Friday be- 
fore the fourth Lord's day in October, 
1845, at 11 o'clock. Brother Parham 
Puckett to preach the Introductory Ser- 
mon, and if he fail, bro. Ichabod Moore. 

Called for Corresponding Letters from 
sister Associations, when the delegates' 
from White Oak, handed in their letter, 
which was read and received. 

The Committee on finance reported as 
follows: 

Balance in hand last year, $25 50 

Contributions this yearj 15 50 



$41 00 



Paid brother Ichabod Moore, 
for transcribing, superinten- 
ding, and distributing the 
, kjFt year's Minutes, $6 00 

Paid for printing these Min- 
utes, 10 00 



16 00 



Balance in our treasury, $25 00 

Appointed brother Ichabod Moore our 
Treasurer. 

Called for the Circular Letter, and ap- 
pointed brethren Wm. Thigpen, Jesse C. 
Knight, Benjamin Bynum, James Griffin, 
and Josiah Smith, a committee to examine 
the same and report to-morrow. 

A question arose in the Association re- 
lative to exchanging times- of- holding 
meetings with white Oak Association, 
and after some debate it was dropped. 

Then adjourned till to-morrow 10' o'- 
clock. 

SATURDAY morning, met pursuant 
t6 adjournment from yesterday. 

The Association was opened by prayer 
and praise. ' 

Called the list and noted the absentees. 

The committee appointed yesterday to 
examine the Circular Letter, reported that 
they had done so, and spoke favorable to 
its reception; after which it was read in 
the Association, and it was ordered to be 
printed with these Minutes. 

Took up the correspondence with sister 



I Associations, and appointed the following 
brethren: To White Oak, James Griffin^ 
( John Smith, and Wright Smith; to Kehii- 
j kee, James Griffin, Parham Puckett, and 
I Jesse C. Knight; to Little River, Ichabod 
Moore, Benjamin Bynum, and Parham 
Puckett; to Country Line, and Abbott's 
Creek Union, Parham Puckett and Benja- 
min Bynum. 

Appointed brother James Griffin to 
write a Circular Letter to be printed witH 
our next Minutes. 

Appointed ministers to preach to-mor- 
row — Elders, Josiah Smith and James Os- 
bourn — i& commence it 10 o'clock, A. M. 

Appointed brother Ichabod Moore to" 
transcribe and superintend the printing of 
these Minutes, and to have 400 copies 
printed and distribute them as usual. 

The Minutes were read, and assigned by 
the Moderator arid Clerk. Then adjourn- 
ed to time and place above named. 

BENJAMIN BYNUM, Mo. 
ICHABOD MOORE, Clerk. 

SABBATH morning, October 27thv— 
Met at the stage at 10 o'clock. Elder Jo- 
siah Smith introduced the worship of the' 
day from Isaiah, 27 c. and- 13 v.: "And it 
shall come to pass in that day, that the 
great trumpet shall be blown, and they 
shall come which were ready to perish m 
the land of Assyria, and the outcasts in the 
land of Egypt, and shall worship the Lord 
in the holy mo&nt at Jerusalem." Elder 
James Osbourn followed front Revela- 
tion, 22 c. and 1 v.: "And he shewed me a 
pure river of water of life, clear as crystal, 
proceeding out of the throne of God, and of 
the Lamb." Good behaviour was the or- 
der of the day, and< the brethren (We hope) 
parted in union. And may God grant a 
divine blessing for Christ's sake. Amen. 

CIRCULAR LETTS K, 

The Ministers and Delegates thai com- 
jjose the 14th Annual Session of the 
Contentnea Baptist Association, to 
the churches which they represent. 
Beloved Brethren: We have been 

thinking of many subjects since our last 



n 



meeting; but, there is none on our minds, 
at present, that may be of more use to 
God's people, than to call their pure minds 
to the high obligations we owe. to our 
heavenly Father, and some of the many 
duties we owe to Him; and in doing this, 
we feel bound to make a few passing re- 
marks relative to His divine character, 
and infinite goodness? 

1st. God is a spirit and does not have 
flesh and bones as you see men have, and 
no worshipper of Him should draw any 
picture of any likeness of things an this 
globe, or in any other region whatever as 
a resemblance of the living God, as also 
sayeth the, law. 

2nd. He eternally existed of himself, 
& does not borrow leave to be, nor claims 
aid from any source, whatever, for he is 
omnipotent in power, his love is eternal, 
he is allwise, and was perfectly acquaint- 
ed with all things, before he pushed them 
into existence, as. he is, now or will be in 
any time whatever. His goodness fills 
the heavens and extends, to all generations 
on earth. His mercy is forever. and ever. 
He is. also omnipotent, everywhere at the 
same time, and where he is not is no- 
where, and at one single glance, he sees 
every thing in heaven and on earth. He. 
is a God of truth, and never varies one 
single shade for great nor small. He. also 
is a G;o_d of justice, and never. will deviate 
one hair's breadth from it for friend or foe; 
for justice, and judgment are the habita- 
tions of his, throne, he is perfection of ho- 
liness and never can deviate from it one 
shade, for he is of oneness of mind and 
none can, turn him. He is also a God of 
life and does not confer .the power to bes- 
tow life to any other, and always makes 
Christians himself, for he is God and there 
is none else. His purpose is eternal, and 
has not met with an}* change since the 
creation of the world, nor never, will un- 
til it will end; and all his works are car- 
ried on according to his eternal purpose. 
And in creation he displayed his goodness 
and power, and pronounced all the work- 
manship of his hands to be good. Also, 
[rod the Son possesses all the divine 



qualities of his Father, for he was there 
antecedent to the world in his Father's bo- 
som or as one brought up with him; and 
his delight was with the sons of men, and 
even at the creation of the world was with 
the father, for it is said: All things were 
made by him, and without him was not 
any thing- made that was made. But 
those that subscribe to the Unitarian prin- 
ciple, and deny his divinity, need not up- 
on their plan ever anticipate entering the 
kingdom of heaven. But we state to you 
that God the Father was creator, lawgiv- 
er and Judge. He, therefore, issued the 
law to our fore-parents in righteousness, 
and after they transgressed that law, he 
passed the sentence of condemnation upon 
them and their posterity in a just or righ- 
teous manner; under which law they must 
have remained eternally, but for his great 
love, wherewith he loved us in Christ, and 
according to his eternal purpose chose us 
in him before the world began; for God 
so loved the world, &c. And Christ is the 
effect of God's love to the world. Be- 
hold, behold what manner of love the Fa- 
ther hath bestowed upon us, &c. More- 
over, sinners were objects of his eternal 
complacency, and when we come to view 
his great love wherewith he loved us even 
when we were dead in sins, we call on ev^ 
ery power of our souls to praise his holy 
name. 

And again, when we see that our ingra- 
titude did not change his mind to us, but 
when we were enemies sent his Son in our 
stead to die the just for the unjust, and pur- 
chase eternal redemption for us, it brings 
to our view some of the many obligations 
we are under to him. But for his good- 
ness he might have passed us by, and have 
executed his wrath upon us; and our fate 
might have been with devils and damned 
spirits forever and ever. 

Once more, when we come to view 
God perfectly happy in and of himself, 
and all. the heavenly bodies fall down be- 
fore his exalted throne, and the elders cast 
their glittering crowns in humble reve- 
rence at his feet, and at the same time see 
him hold up heaven, earth, and all their 



fcontents at his pleasure, and yet .have re- 
spect to poor, helpless, lost sinners in their 
low diversified state, and sends his spirit 
to bring them from death unto life, it 
.brings to view the many, yea, the very 
many obligations we are under to praise 
and adore him. 

Having remarked thus far, we proceed 
to take up another part of our subject, that 
is, love to God. We love him because he 
first loved us. Again, love God and keep 
liis commandmonts, for this is the whole 
duty of man. But we ask, can the impeni- 
tent sinner love him? The answer is ob- 
vious to every Christian; they cannot, for 
they are enemies to him and are not sub- 
ject to his laws, neither indeed can be. 
Consequently, their natures are averse to 
jhis, and will be until grace interposes and 
changes their nature. 1st. We got our 
carnal nature by birthright from our earth- 
ly parents, and never can by this change 
the current of our minds to love God. But 
no doubt there are thousands anticipating 
happiness from human agency, and we 
would do well to examine ourselves whe- 
ther we be in the faith. 2nd. If we love 
jGod we got that nature from our heavenly 
parent in the second birth, for in that birth 
the life of God is set up in the soul, which 
is a holy life averse to sin in every shape 
or form, let it appear as it may. And that 
man that calls himself a Christian and 
don't hate sin, don't love God; and if he 
does not love him, it proves at once he has 
not passed the new birth. 

So, brethren, we know the first Christian 
(Juty we owe to God is to love him; and if 
so, we will keep his commandments, for it 
is congenial with that nature. And, 
brethren, when we see his great love and 
goodness toward us, in ransoming our 
souls from the pit, how charming and 
how lovely is his name. 3rd. If any man 
love not our Lord Jesus Christ, let him be 
accurst. And it is in vain for any to tell 
us they love him, without they have seen 
something of the great debt they owe to 
him. For when we were helpless and 
without strength in the original mass, or 
before our visible appearance in time, he 



left his Father's courts above and came un- 
der the law to redeem them that were .un- 
der the law. And although we were dor- 
mant, he gave his life a ransom for us and 
paid the debt we owed to his Father's law: 
which debt must have sunk us down to the 
chambers of eternal death. And seeing 
this was our case, we never can tell how 
many obligations we are under to him, nor 
how great a debt we owe. And moreover, 
when we see he has conferred on us alj 
temporal blessings, as well as all the trea- 
sures of grace, it must still increase pur 
love to him; and not only this, but sent 
the Holy Spirit into the world to convince 
us of sin, and of righteousness, and of 
judgment; and gave us an experimental 
knowledge of our own weak and helpless 
state, and showed us, that we could not 
save ourselves in part nor in whole, and 
set our sins before our faces in such a clear 
manner, as to make us pass judgment 
against ourselves, for some men's sins are 
open before going to judgment, and some 
follow after and again convince us of the 

| insufficiency of our own righteousness, 
and pointed us to that blessed robe that 

i the son of God wrought out, for he shal) 

take of mine and shall shew it unto yoij, 

saith the good Book. 

Brethren, when we take a view of what 

is written above, and the riches of divine 

grace, and the many other things not >yrit* 

ten in this letter which present themselves 

i . . . - 3 

to our view, it is certainly enough to 

I bring to our remembrance, that Christ is a 
lawgiver and a judge, and we are bound 
to obey him in all his sayings, for the 
law of Christ is the law the church should 
keep to the end of the world. And we 
say, the man that does not love God is not 
willing to keep his commandments, and 
if so, it proves clear that he does not ex^ 
perimentally know him. 

4th. And if we experimentally know 
him, the next obligation we are under is, 
to love one another; for by it, it is to be 
known that we have passed from death un- 
to life. So, brethren examine yourselves 
and sec whether or not, you love your 
brethren in this cold dark time of religion, 



and see whether your conduct proves it. 
Do you meet often together as Christians 
did in days past? do you love to go up to 
the house of God and converse about the 
lovely Jesus, and speak of the glory of his 
kingdom, and talk of his power? and do 
we love to be in each other's company as 
,pften as convenient and hear tell of the 
prosperity of the church of God? and are 
[we often found praying for our brethren, 
that God would keep them from evil and 
preserve them to his heavenly kingdom? 
: in a word, do we crave their welfare in 
this world and in the world to come? and 
•if so, it is a true manifest token that we 
are taught of God to love one another, and 
.this is the commandment of God that we 
should love one another, and a true evi- 
dence of our eternal happiness after we 
leave this world. 

Now, brethren, if we have the above 
evidences of Christianity, it is our unboun- 
ded duty to follow the footsteps of Christ, 
our leader, and his people of all ages. 1st. 
The pillar of cloud, that went before the 
children of Israel to the promised land, was 
a figure of Christ, and you notice they 
followed it all their journey through, and 
when the cloud stood still, they stood still; 
and when the cloud went on, they went 
on. Therefore? the first Christian duty, af- 
er the above evidences, is to be baptised, 
we say by immersion; that, like as Christ 
died and was raised from the dead by the 
glory of the Father, even so, also we 
should walk in newness of life; and if we 
have followed him, and obeyed him, thus 
far, the next thing is to prove our religion 
by keeping the commandments of Christ; 
we are not to forsake the assembling of 
ourselves together as the manner of some 
(now) is. 

Brethren, is not this commandment de- 
viated from too much? Yes. And at the 
time pf our own meetings. These things 
pught not so to be, but, let every Chris- 
tian possess his vessel in the house of God, 
in sanctification and in honor: you are 
not to turn-about after every wind of doc- 
trine; but to be steadfast, immoveable, al- 
ways abounding in the. work of the Lord. 



But, brethren, we see some 'dissenting 
from us and preaching, we can't tell how 
| many professions to please, and w T ear a 
J coat to fit them all. 

Brethren, judge ye, whether this is ac- 
cording to the pattern of Christ or not; the 
Book says, it is not. Take not with you 
two coats; but some think it is to their ad- 
vantage to wear a coat to fit every one. 
They meet and say, at the same time to a 
missionary Baptist, howd'ye brother; and 
if they meet a freewill Baptist, how d'ye, 
brother; and if a Methodist, how d'ye, 
brother; and to the non-professor, how 
d'ye, brother; and who they can't brother 
we know not. Now, brethren, is this ac- 
cording to apostolic practice? No: for they 
went to their own company; again, be not 
carried about by every wind of doctrine. 
Watch and pray that you enter not into 
temptation. 

Brethren, this duty is too much neglec- 
ted among us, for there are some that don't 
watch and perhaps stumble and get out of 
| the way, and almost forget to pray, and 
| pierce themselves through with many sor r 
| rows, and look as if they were gone back 
to the world. Again, watch and be so- 
ber, and abstain from every appearance of 
evil. But, brethren, there are some, that 
have forgot what they should abstain from. 
They should abstain from pollutions of 
idols, from fornication, from things stran r 
gled and from blood. Lastly, brethren, it 
is said, by some of our opponents, tfiat 
there will not be one of the Old Side Bap^ 
tist, in some ten or twenty years to be 
found. Who believes that? very few; but 
those, that are enemies of the cross of 
Christ. 

But, brethren, we are persuaded better 
things of you, and things that accompany 
■salvation, tho' we thus speak, for God will 
surely visit you, for the promise runs thus: 
I at the time appointed I will come and Sa- 
1 rah shall have a son; and if we are not de- 
ceived, we see sqme symptoms of his near 
approach; and our combined prayer to 
God is, that he may, before our next an- 
nual meeting, mount the white horse of 
the gospel and ride through every one of 



Qur churches and saye our families, ^ur 
neighbors, or, at least, such as are ordain- 
ed unto eternal life. 

Brethren, keep the commandment?? o£ 



God blameless,; be of one mind; live in, 
peace and the God of love and peace s 
be 'vyith you. 



printed at the Office of; the Primitive Baptist, I'urburQ*, N. Q. 



W^*£flfcs*.-' 



Minutes 



OP THE 



JFMFTEE.YTH Jl i J%Vrt^K, SESSION 



OF THH 



Contentnea Baptist Association, 

miiM at 
itahunta m. ti., Wayne couiity. UL C. 

0/i M* 24M, 25th, and 2Qth days of October, 1845. 

/ . £■ t : § : t * 

ry FRIDAY, October 24. I Corresponding ministers and messen- 

n Pursuant to adjournment from last year, gers from sister Associations were invited 
Elder Ichabod Moore preached the Intro- to take seats with us; when brethren Wm. 
ductory Sermon, from 1st general epistle Hyman, John H. Daniel and John Bryan, 
of Peter, 5 c. and 2nd, 3rd, an J 4th ver- from Kehukee, took, seats with us and 
*es: "Feed the flock of God which is handed in a letter with a file of their Mi n- 
among you, taking the oversight thereof, utes; also, from White Oak, brethren Josi- 
ijot by constraint, but willingly; not for ah Smith and Samuel Holt, wifh .a letter 
filthy lucre, but of a ready mind;— neither and a file of their Minutes; also, from Lit- 
as being lords over God's heritage, but j tie River, brethren John Canaday and 
being ensamples to the flock. And when ! James Wilson, with a file o( their, Min-~ 
the chief shepherd shall appear, ye shall utes: also, brother Parham Pucket handed" 
receive a crown ot glory that fadeth not, in a file of Minutes from Abbott's Creek 
away." Union, of last year. Brother Wilder. also 

% The delegates met together, and the handed in a file of Minutes from tfie Coun- 
Association was opened by prayer; af- try Line Association, and one from the 
ter which', they chose Elder Efenjamin Abbott's Creek* Union. The above na- 
Bynum, Moderator; and IchaSbd Moore, ' med brethren were gladly received, and 
Clerk; and Jesse C. Knight, Assistant took seats with us. 

Clerk. Chose brethren Wright Smith and I The letters from the churches were call- 
Allen W. Wooten, a Committee on Fi- ed for, and their contents inserted in t&i 
nancfc. fellewirig fable/ 



* 



JSJames of Ch arches, "and 

.counties wherein 

situated i 



A u trey's Creek, Edgecombe, 
Beaver Dam, Lenoi'-, 
s J3lac,k jOreek, Wayne, 
jijancqck's, Pit/, 
Meadow, irreene. 
Memorial, Wuyne, 
N a h u 1 1 ta , Way ne, 
Newport Chapel, Wayne, 
Pleasant Hill, Edgecombe, 
Pleasant Plains, Wayne, 
^ed Banks, Pitt, 
JSandy Bottom, Lenoir, 
Ti son's, Pitt, 
Tqisnot, Edgecombe, 
Town Ore<-k, E/gecntnbe, 
f J ii ion, Edicecom be, « 
Wh to 0,i k, Edgecombe, 
Friendship, t- "■yne, 



NAMES OF THE DELEGATES. 



John \\ Moore, Stephen Wooteri,* 
Paxham Purke.t L Williams .1 Heath,* 
Wm Bass,* Linsy Bell, Jshara Lamb,* 
John Smit l i, Win Mumfonl, L Griffin,* 
Benj By,nnm, Win Williams Willie Jones 
Wasli-'n Hooks, VV Hollands Wright Bass 
Leonard Pate, Shadrach Pate, W T Taylor, 
Saunders P Cox, WmR<>use, Thomas Price 
V\ m Pearee,* Elzy Taylor,* Jacob Proctor 
Wright Smith, 

JamesGriffin.* Geo McGownds,* A Stocks. 
J R Groom, AW Woolen, Richard Rouse, 
Snmuei Moore. B Briley, Benjamin Corey,* 
Wm Wijodard,* W ilountree,* L Dew,* 
Jesse C Knight, Th Dupree,* VYLFIeming 
J H Armstrong, N Taylor,* Ely Bobbins, 
Ichaborl Moore, VV M Siarilon,* 1 BVVoodard, 
Jas.il Parker,.lacoiv Herring, Beiijljerrifig, 
* Absent. 




''V\"! fgr petitionary letters. One was follows: to IJehukee, brethren Iehabod 
handed in from the church at Friendship, Moore, Jesse 0. J£nigbt, John Smith, Ja- 
pnd after examination she was found to be cob Proctor, Wright Smith, Willis L. 
of our faith and order, and was recei- Fleming, and Parham Packet; to Country 
ved a member in our body, by the Mode- Line and Abbot's Creek Union, Benjamin 
rator giving' her delegates the right hand Bvnum, John Smith and Parham Pucket; 



$25 



of fellowship. 

The Committee on Finance reported — 

Balance in hand last year, 

Paid Jehabod Moore for iranscti. 
bing, superintending and dis- 
tributing la?t year's Mioiites, 

Paid for printing these Minu'eV 

1 3 



Balance in the hands of tb 

Circular letter called for. None pre- 
sented. 



to the Little River, Jacob Herring, John 
Smith, Shadrach Fate, Parham Pucket 
and John Ii. Moore; to White Oak, Ben- 
jamin Bynum, John Smith, Shadrach 
Pate, John R. Moore, Washington M. 
Stanton and Wright Smith. 

Appointed brother Benjamin Bynum, 

-to write a Circular Letter tp be printed 
IVeasurer, $\2 W^ 0Uf nextMinuteSe 



$6 
7 



Called the list ami noted the absentees 
thus *. 

Appointed our next Association to be! A question arose in the Association, 
held with the church at Autrey's Creek, from the letter from the church at Plea? 
Edgecombe county, N. C, to commence sunt Plains; and after some preliminary 
Friday before the fourth Lord 1 ® day in remarks, it was reduced to a query in the 
October, 1846, at 11 o'clock, A. M., bro- following manner: Is it right to give to 
ther Parham Pucket to prea@h the Intro- 'fit her denominations the appellation of 
ductory Sermon, and if he fail, brother, brother and sister, or what advice will the 
John Smith. ! Association give? Answer. Not right, 

. Then adjourned till to-morrow 10 o'- and we advise the brethren and sisters to 
clock. quit the practice. 

SATURDAY, October 25. Called for Corresponding Letters from 

Met pursuant to adjournment from yes- sister Associations, when the delegates 

terday,and after prayer and praise, appoin-' from Kehukee handed in their letter, 

Um .our deleptc$ to bister Asyoiiiutioniji, ae> ivlHch was read and received; also, the. 



delegates from White Oak handed in their 
letter, which was read and received. 

Appointed ministers to preach to-mp,r- 
ro,w; hrethren Wm. Hyman, Wilder and 
jfosia^ Smith. Worship to commence aj, 
\0 o'clock. 

Appointed brother Ichabod Moore our 
Treasurer, and instructed him to l)aye 400 
popies of these Minutes printed, and to 
(Jistribute them as usual; al§o tQ transcribe 
and superintend the printing the same. 

The Minutes were read and assigned by 
the Moderator and Clerk. Then adjourn- 
ecj to time and place above named. 

BENJAMIN 3YNUM, Mod. 
ICHABOD MOOSE, Clk. 



SABBATH MORNING, Oct. 26. 

Met at the stage at 10 o'clock. Elder 
Wm. Jiyman introduced the worship of the 



day from 2nd Timothy, 2nd c. and 15th 
v.: "Study to shew thyself approved unto 
Go4> 3 workman that needeth not to be 
ashamed, rightly dividing t\\e. word of 
truth- Elder Wilder followed from 
Psalms, 37 p. and 3 v.: ''Trust in the 
Lord, and do goqd: so shall thou dwell in 
the land, and verily thou shalt be fed." 
Elder Josiah §mith foJloYyed frqm Psalms, 
33 e. and 12 v.: "Blessed is the nation 
whose God is the Lord; and the people 
whom he hath chosen, for his own inherit- 
ance. We hope the I^ord will add a bless-' 
ing to the word preached through the 
round of this meeting; and may it have 
been as seed fallen into good ground that 
may bring forth fruit some thirty, some 
sixty, & some an hundred fold; & may the 
Lord preserve us and keep us unto his hea- 
venly kingdom for Christ's sake. Amen, 



• 



" .•■^sfiS? ... - 

^^nS -^ ^ ,?**,:/• 

.95?'''' ■ ; # a «*N«^ 



mi 



MINUTES 



HI 



OF THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 

Gohtentnea Baptist Association,- 



HELD AT 



fiu trey's Creek m. h«, Bdgecornbe county, North Carolina, on the 23rd, 24th/ 
and 25th days of October, 184 6. 



FRIDAY, October S3rd. sister Associations, were invited to take 

1st. Pursuant to adjournment from last seats with us; when brethren William 
year, Elder John Smith preached the In- 1 Thigpen and John H.Daniel, from the 
Iroductbry Sermon from 1st Timothy, 4 Jtehukee, handed in a file of their Minute! 
c. and 16 v.: "Take heed unto thyself, and and took seats with us. From Little Ri- 
unto the doctrine; continue in them: for ver, brethren Burwell Temple, John Canna- 
in doing this thou shalt bolh save thyself, dy, and Rufus Temple, took seats with us, 
ancl tfiem tiki? near tnee." land the two latter Handed in a file of thei^ 

2nd. The delegates' met together, and Minutes. From White Oak, brethren 
the Association vvas opened with prayer Robert Aman and Aaron Davis took seats 
and praise by brother Jame3 Griffin. | with us, and handed in a file of their Min- 

3rd. Appointed brother Benjamin By- utes. From Country Line, brethren Lat- 
num, Moderator'; and brother Ichabod ta and Jesse P. Parker took seats with us, 
Moore, Clerk; and brother Jesse C. and handed fri a file of their Minutes." 
Knight, Assistant Clerk; and brethren 5th. Called for the letters from the dif- 
Moses Baker and Sanders P r . Cox, acorn- ferent churches in this Association, and 
mittee on finance. t entered their contents as appears in the 

4th. Ministers, and messengers from following table. , 

m 



Names of Churches, and 

counties wherein 

situated i 



Autrey's Cieek, Edgecombe 
Beaver Dam, Lenoir, 
& lack Creek, Wayne, 
Friendship, Wayne, 
Hancock's, Pitt, 
MeWddw, Greerte,\ 
Memorial, Wayne,' 
Nahunta, Wayne, 
Newport Chapel, Wayne, 
Pleasant Hill, Edgecombe, 
Pleasant Plains, Wayne, 
Red Banks, Pitt, 
Sandy Bottom, Lenoir, 
Tison's, Pitt, 
l^isnot, Edgecombe, ' 
Town Creek, Edgecombe, 
ijnxori; Edgecombe^ 
While' Oak, Edgecombe, 



NAMES' OF THE DELEGATES/ 



co| fe fe 



II. 



»mm 






John R Mobre, Ste'n Wooten, John Cobb, 
Parham Pocket, A Jones*. L Williams,* 
VVm Bass, Linsy Bell, Abraham Lamb,* \ 
Jacob Herring-, Benj Herring,*Ja's R Parker,' 
L Griffin, John Smith, W'm Muinfurd, 
Benj Bynum, WmWilliams, Jos Rasberry, 
Woodard Holland, Washington Hooks, 
John Smith, Shadrach Pate, Leonard Pate, 
Sanders P Cox, Woi Rouse, "H Howell, 
Jacob Proctor, Elzy Taylor, Fred Proctor, 
V\ right Smith, 

James Griffin, Caleb Nelson, Allen Stocks, 
J R Croom,Rpddin Groom, A W Wooten,* 
Samnel Moore, B Briiey,Benjamin Corey,* 
Not represented. 

Moses Baker, Jesse C Knight. T Bynnm, 
J H Armstrong, N Taylor, Ely Rohbins, 
tchabod Moore, W M Stanton, J B Woodard, 
*Absent. 



I ! 



! 2 

Is 

S 



17 



2, T 8 £ 9 



35 
41 
21 
13 
21 
29 
19 
70 
47 
13 
8 
58 
17 
14 

62 

38 

28 



637 



$Ct8 

50 

50 

60 

75 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

50 

25 

1 00 
60 

1 50 
1 00 
1 00 

13 5@ 



*4 



6th. When the letter for Sandy Bottom 
Was called for, there were two letters han- 
ded in; which the Association received so 
far as to have them read. And after they 
were read, it appeared from them that a 
division had taken place in that church; 
and brethren Benj. Bynum and Jacob Her- 
ring being well acquainted! with the cir- 
cumstance, by the request of the Associa- 
tion explained the matter in a brief man- 
ner. After which several explanatory re- 
marks were made by several of the breth- 
renyarrtl the Association withdrew from- 
the church, leaving herself the privilege to 
receive one or both parties back again if 
she chose. And after a few minutes, Jo- 
seph" R. Croom petitioned for himself and 
sixteen Other members, which was receiv- 
ed into this Association in the name of the 
Sandy Bottom church, and the names of 
their delegates appears m the table of the 
churches. 

7th. Petitionary letters called for— none 
present. 

8th. Called' for a Circular Letter, and 
©rie was handed in, and a committee ap- 
pointed^ ftrexamirie the same, consisting of 
brethren Bur well Temple, John Cannady, 
John Smith, Joseph R. Croom, with the 
writer, and to report to-morrow. 

9th. Appointed our next Association to 
be held with the chnrcli at Black Creek, 
Wayne' county, to commence at 11 o'- 
clock on Friday before the fourth Lord's 
day in October, 1847. 

10th. Appointed brother James Griffin 
to preach the Introductory Sermon, and if 
he fail, brother Benjamin Bynum. 

11th. Then adjourned till to-morrow 
LO o? clonk. 

SATURDAY. October 24th. 

12th. Met pursuant to adjournment 
from yesterday, when the Association was 
opened with prayer and praise by Elder 
John Cannady. 

13th. Called the roll, and noted the ab- 
sentees thus *. 

14th. The committee appointed to exa- 
mine the Circular Letter reported favora- 
bly to its reception; after which it was 



| read, received, and ordered to be printed 
with these Minutes. 

15th. The committee oh finance report: 



I Balance in hand last year, 
i Contributions this year, 



$12 00' 
13 50 



Paid ichabod Moore for trary-. $25' 50 
sc v i b i n g , s u pe r i n t e n d rn g and' 
di'stri-Wting last year's Min- 
nas, $q oo l 

Paid for printing last year's 

Minutes, j Q0" 



13 0$ 



| Balance in the hands of the Trea'r, $1*2' 50 s 
16th. Appointed messengers to sister' 

: Associations: to Kebt*kee, brethren John 1 
Smith, James B=. Woodard, Benjamin Bri- 

| ley, $*$kh R. Moore, Jesse C. Knight, and 

| Washington M. Stanton* to W&ite Oaky 
Joseph ft. Croom, Benjamin Byjmm,- and- 
John R. Moore; to Little River, Jacob 1 

j Herring, William Bass, John Smith, Sen- 
ders P. Cox, and Joseph R. Croom; to* 

| Country Line 1 and Abbott's Creek Union^ 
Benjamin Bynum, John Smith, and IcHa« 
bod Moo^e. 

17th'. Galled for letters from sister As- 
sociations, when brethren Robert Aman 
and Aaron Davis- handed in one from 

I White Oak, which was read and reeeivedv 

18th. Appointed brother Ichabod Moore 

to write a Circular Letter to be printed 

I With our next year's Minutes. 

19th. Appointed ministers to preach to- 

■ morrow, brethren John Cannady and Bur- 
well Temple, and that preaching begin 
half after 10 o'clock, A. M. 

j 20th. Appointed brother Ichabod Mcore 
our treasurer, and to transcribe and super- 
intend the printing and distributing these 
Minutes, and have 450 copies printed, and 
distribute them as last year. 

21st. The Minutes were read and as- 
signed by the Moderator and Clerk, and 4 
then adjourned to time and place as above 
named! 

BENJAMIN BYNUM, Mod's. 
ICHABOD MOORE, Clerk. 

SABBATH, October 25th. 
Met at the stage at half past 10 o'clock, 



ft 



When brother John Cannady opened {he j from its operation. No effort of the mind, 
worship of the day and preached from 
Psalms, 127th chapter and 1st verse: "Ex 
,cept the Lord build the house, they labor 
in vain that build it: Except the Lord 
keep the city, the watchman waketh but 
in vain." Brother Burwell Temple fol- 
lowed and preached from Revelation, 21st 
-c. and latter part of the 9th verse: "Come 
ihitber, I will shew thee the bride, the 
kamb's wife." A large, respectable, and 
well behav«d auditory attended the word 
preached, and vye hope the Lord God, of his 
goodness and ^erey, will bless the same; 
jand our prayer is, that the meeting may 
•prove a blessing to the neighborhood and 
all those who are interested in the same, 
jfor £iujst's sake. Amen, 



CIRCULAR LETTER, 

The Contentnea Bap fist dissociation to 
the P /lurches of which she is joompase^, 
sendeth greeting: 

Dear Brethren: God who has been 
|n all time, the support of his church and 
solace of his people, has not withheld from 
.us in the past year, the mercies of \\\* hand. 
The enlivening sun anxl (he genial show- 
ers, the products of earth, (and perhaps as 
jTiuch as usual the blessings of health) the 
^harms of nature and the sweet converse 
pi friends, and above all the delightful in- 
terchange of Chris! ian affection, and the 
ponsplation of the gospel of Ghrist, have 
all been extended to us by a kind Provi- 
dence and an indulgent parent. And what 
have we rendered in return for all these 
benefits? Alas, brethren, nought but in- 
gratitude, which swells above our faint 
praises and feeble aspirations, and lifts its 
jirazen front on high and irreverently 
iclairns the bounties of heaven as its due. 
Nature, fallen and corrupt, knows nothing 
qf Qpd, qr Christ, or heaven. Christ is as 
a root out of dry ground to it; the carnal 
■mind is enmity to God. Self j's the idol 
upon whose altar all the powers and capa- 
bility of soul, spirit and body were offered 
uq. No age, sex or condition is exempt 



no energy of the body, no sacrifice of the 
hand can eradicate these things from the 
heart, for they constitute its being. — But, 
brethren, we have not so learnt Christ, if 
so be that we have heard him, and have 
been taught by him, as the truth is in Je- 
sus That truth has taught us to know 
something of oursekes and something of 
(Sod, and Christ, and heaven. Its first les- 
son aroused us from th,e slumber of carnal 
security in whi-h we rep »sed; we awoke 
and found ourselves undone. The spell 
which boun4 us was broken, but we were 
left weak and powerless as the feeble in- 
fant when first it sees the light. Light 
had indeed penetrated the dark recesses &f 
our hearts, and exposed to our view some 
of the pollutions there, God in his mercy 
withholding a full disclosure. Oh, who 
can know the corruption of the human 
heart, lime may furrow the cheeks and 
silver the locks of the child of God — and 
could his life be prolonged till lime should 
be no more, yet the depths of that hideousr 
ness could not be fathomed by him, for it 
is deceitful above all things and desperately 
wicked. 

Brethren, we cannot trust it; it has 
prompted us, and it will prompt us again 
to rely upon our own strength; whereas 
we are as weak and helpless now as when 
we first believed. The experience of every 
day shows us that in our weakness lies our 
strength, that in prosperity and in adver- 
sity, in sickness and in death, in trial and 
in triumph, in joy and in sorrow, in all 
the vicissitudes of this mortal life, the dust 
from whence we sprung, and to which we 
must return, js our proper piace. HumjU 
it y is the atmosphere in which the child of 
God breathes most freely, and in which 
he is enabled to do all things through 
Christ which strengthened him. But this 
lesson, engraven on our hearts by the spir- 
it of God, not only taught us our weak- 
ness and nothingness, it not only laid open 
the fountain of our pollution, but it taught 
us something of God, and Christ, mA 



4 



heaven; it directed us to the tree of lifh, 
whose leaves were for the healing of fcht 
nations. We had all our lives, like the 
rest of mankind, heard of Jesus; hut our; 
eyes had never beheld the King in his 
beauty. We ..had all our lives, heard of 
his mercy and kindness, but the half had! 
not been told us. it was when ajl self- 1 
righteousness and self-dependence failed. 
when wretched, and miserable, and poor, 
and blind, and naked, we felt pur condem- 
nation; it was then that his mercy, in all 
its richness and abundance, sheltered our 
wear}' sinking souls, and fille.i us with joy ! 
unspeakable and full of glory. But it was, 
not merely the kindness of Jesus in lifting: 
us above the ruin of fallen and depraved j 
nature; it was not alone the sense of safe- i 
ty from impending destruction that glad- ] 
dened our hearts and tuned our bopj^upftf: 
the mercy of God though extending far 
joeyond our utmost thoughts, and running; 
over in regard to our deliverance, had not! 
been exercised at the expense of justice; 
for then our cop of rejoicing could soon | 
jhave been exhausted; but mercy and truth, 
had met together, righteousness and peace, 
had kissed'each other. - Justice had reeei- 1 
ved infinite satisfaction in the surety's! 
blood, we had been introduced to thej 
privileges and immunises of the Father'sl 
house, where Jesus reigns and where there j 
)f no law but love. 

From hence the holiest duties flow, 
Of saints above and saints below, 

And now, brethren, as the object con 
templated by a ( ircujar Letter, is to ad 
dress personally each individual member 
composing all the churches of the A.-soeia 
tion, and to apply the convolutions as well 
as the precepts of the gospel to each mind 
and heart; as such, it not only become.- 
our duty to instruct and comfort the Chris- 
tian, by the solacing doctrine of the eh c 
tion of God and all its happy ronsfqoen- 
ces; but it becomes our duty also to point 
out to the Christian those duties incumbent 
on him from the relationship he sustains to 
god, and to urge upon him the import- 



ance of faithfully discharging them, where- 
by God is glorified, and the fruits of right- 
eousness abound in the, Christian life. Ac- 
cording to our views of the plan of salva- 
tion, and the economy of God's grace, all 
Christians stand upon a level in Christ ,Je= 
sus. They have al] been redeemed at the 
same expense, and are ail dr?t-ined to tjhe 
same mansions of glory. Therefore, let 
us consider what are the mutual duties of 
church members. — Every act of members, 
either in public or private, which is calcu- 
lated to inOnenee in any degree the dis- 
cipline of ihe churches, it is conceived is 
properly embraced within the compass of 
the question. 

The government of a church signifies 
something more ihaii <he business ordina- 
rily transacted on the days of meeting. It 
reaches to all thst salutary kind of ip|!#- 
ence, which the grave and more orderly 
members exen-jse over tjiose of an oppo- 
site character. The conversation and ex- 
ample of such persona create a sort of 
wholesome government over others — con- 
nected with which is tjie very important 
consideration of watch care, $'h'en the 
primitive disciples gave themselves to the 
Lord, and to one another, one of the es- 
sential benefits designee! to be secured \va| 
watch care. They did not unite to resist 
the authority of the jand, which hejd its 
sword at their bosoms, nor to enhance their, 
jemporal interest. &o, there was a high- 
er and nobler object held in anxious con- 
iemplafion, it vyas the assisting each other 
to }e&<j a life so holy and harmless, both in 
word ai.d i\e^(]^ that tjieir persecutory 
should be constrained to ackowledge they 
had been wi'h Jesus; (and such brethren, 
should be our course in the present day, 
for we are proscribed and every where 
spoken against.) Hut they were too well 
acquainted with the natural depravity of 
their hearts to expect to accomplish their 
object, without a constant and sharp sighted 
watch care. Self interest and prejudice 
blend in us, and we therefore need the im- 
partial minister, who will survey our ac- 



lions and point put our faults, destitute of 
that interest which is inseparable from 
righteous self. Hence we discover the 
necessity of brotherly rebuke, which is 
one of the great Christian duties inculea.tedf 
by tjie Saviour in the 18 c. of Matt., and if 
ijhose incipient measures there introduce^ 
,by him, were more closely adhered to in 
^he present day, no doubt but our churches 
would be more healthy and prosperous. 
There was a faithfulness in the perform- 
ance of t,his duty among the p/imhive ^dis- 
ciples of Jesus, which is a stranger in the 
church in these daysof worldly conformity. 

Their own liableness to err is urged as 
an excuse by mat;y ipr neglecting to re ; bu kg 
others. But the secret of the affair is, we 
are too unfaithful, too much afraid of the 
cross to discharge these duties, as |J be- 
comes the self-denying Christian. The 
spirit of this j) lea for neglecting to rebuke, 
when the good of wanderers requires it, 
would relax if not destroy every nerve of 
Christian discipline, fiavid remained in- 
sensible of his crime Until Nathan rebuked 
him; and Peter had no compunction of 
conscience for his profane denial of Jesus, 
till his penetrating eye called up the trans- 
action of a previous fiour. 

Vyjien the jUhrigtian errs, which all are 
liable to do, & such error is pointed out to 
him in the spirit of meekness, he is always 
ready to make suitable concession. The 
duties named are common every day du- 
ties; but there are others to he performed 



cp,ric(ucted, that each member might ex- 
press his approbation or disapprobation by 
his vote, which, if silence were to decide, 
he m,igh,t not express. 

it is the duty o/ every church to frame a 
decorum, or a rule 0/ government, predi- 
cated upon the scriptures, and each new 
member should be well acquainted with 
those rules. We are aware thai there sre 
some who are opposed to decorums or 
creeds, alleging JLha^ the Bible is a suffi- 
cient rule of faith and practice. Tfeal wp 
cheerfully admit, butil?at is no ground of 
objection. To those that thus object, we 
would say, the minister tajkes hj§ text and 
(Jedyces therefrom the doctrine inculcated 
in the scripture hy making quotations, or 
bringing up certain passages, or subsidia- 
ries or proofs of his views. Now if you ob- 
ject to the creed or decorum, the preacher 
should continue to quote scripture in suc- 
cession, tjl] proof arose to demonstration, 
and not to select pertain passages; for what 
is a creed or rules of church government 
but certain passages of scripture, pp that the 
eye may catch them at a single glance. 

We have a custom among us (anjd one of 
much importance too,) for church mem- 
bers, when speaking in debate, to rise froni 
jtheir seats and address the Moderator; 
though sometimes with regret we se$ 
members keep £heir seats while speaking 
it) conference. IJow if it is the du- 
ty of a church member, yvjien speaking in 
(|eba£e, tg rise frorn his seat and address 



by the church, as a body. Here motions the Moderator, could there be any impro- 
are to be made and seconded, subjects to piiety in havjne it so expressed jn the 
be discussed candidly and freely, and votes rules of decorum. W r e expect the tylode- 



to be given. That manner which obtains 
in some churches of allowing silence to de- 
cide a great portion of the questions for 
consideration, we conceive to be a subject 
well worthy of our deliberation; and in all 
transactions of importance, the decision 
should be known by the expressed will of 
the church; for church acts not only relate 
to our peace and happiness here, as church 
members, but they are predicated upon 
*he authority of Christ; and should be so 



ratorqf a church to have all her business 
conducted in good order, and yep there are 
no rules by which rie or the chnrch are to 
be governed. And suppose, a? fs some- 
times the case, that some member may be 
frequently absent from chureh meetings, 
until the feelings of other members become 
hurt; you have no rules by which you 
dare say to him it is his duty to attend con- 
ference. 

It is true, the scripture says, not forsa r 



6 



king the assembling of ourselves together: 
but who is more competent to determine 
the times and places of assembling, than 
the church collectively? And we all know, 
|hat it is the duty of all church members, 
without some gopcl cause of absence, to at- 
tend their church meeting". And could it 
do. any harm to say, in a rule of the church, 
that it should be the duty of each male- 
member in particular, to attend as above, 
and then in the event of such repeated ab- 
sence, it would become the duty of the 
church to notice such absence. 

But some will say, if members are not 
influenced by the love of God and a love 
for his cause to attend, it would be useless 
fo. coerce attendance by a church disci- 
pline. So say we. But we contend that 
if members, by neglecting to attend their 
church meetings reproach the cause and 
wound the feelings of other members, that 
the church should have some rule to re- 
claim them, or to cease to b,e accountable 
for their acts. For it is better for one re- 
fractory member to suffer, than for the 
wh,ole church to suffer, or the cause be 
brought into disrepute. 

To all religious bodies, there should be 
wholesome rules of government, to which 
t|]ey could at any time appeal for the ad- 
justment of all difficulties. Finally we I 
cannot terminate that portion of our sub- i 
ject, which relates tq Christian duties, 
without mentioning some others, though 
not immediately connected with the gov i 
ernment of the church Brethren, who of I 
you but have witnessed, with gratitude to ; 
God, the reformation in the churches, in I 
doctrine which has been brought about, 
within a few years, by those who have so 
ably defended the truths of the gospel, and 
by the withdrawal of the churches from 
the popular innovations that were corro- 
ding her vitals. And whereas, the dear 
children of God were deprived, to a con- 
siderable extent, of that gospel (hat dis- 
claims all human merit, and predicates the 
Salvation of the lost sinner, upon the righ- 
teousness of Jesus ; as being the result o< 



election and sovereign grace. Y( u now 
have it in the fulness of the revelation of 
God through the ministry, by which it is 
apparent that we have this treasure in 
earthen vessels, that the excellency of the 
power may be of God and not. of us. Yet, 
we have still to regret a want of rcforma* 
tion in Christian duties, tjie fnithful per- 
formance of which exert so happy an influ- 
ence over the churches, and reflects so 
hij;h a degree of praise to our heavenly 
Father. 

How many of us, in the enjoyment of 
a blessed gospel and Christian privileges, 
employ those means by which we are to 
grow in grace and in the knowledge of our; 
Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ. Who of 
us obey the injunction of the Saviour, 
"search the scriptures, for in them you 
think you have eternal life, and they are 
they that testify of me." How many of 
us call our families together at evening, or 
morning, and instruct them from the scrip? 
lures, and invoke the blessing of God up- 
on them and us; or do we forget the great 
responsibility that rests upon us as the 
heads and directors of those the Lord has 
given into our charge, and for the welfare 
of whom we feel so much anxjety. It is 
therefore the duty of eac\\ Christian parent, 
to order his household according to the dir 
rection given in the scripture, and if we 
wculd realize the blessing, we must learn 
that it is in his deeds that the righteous are; 
blessed. 

But how many professing parents do we 
now address, whose children have never 
heard them pray for them, and how will 
our children know we desire their salva- 
tion and welfare, unless we point them to 
the Saviour and ask his pardoning mercy 
upon them. And though we may offer up 
our secret prayers, and shed a thousand 
tears before the Almighty for our chil- 
dren, yet this does not exempt us from 
that important duty, in view of which, the 
patriarch Joshua exclaimed, "Let others, 
do as they may, as for me and my house, 
we will serve" the Lord." But in passing 



from these duties, we wish to impress on 
your minds, that, your obligation to per- 
form them, arises not from the relation- 
ship you sustain to man, but to Hod. And 
if the love and mercy of God, made mani- 
fest to (is through Christ, have imposed 
these duties upon us, how can we omit 
them? for it is through the manifestation 
of God's merry ^ that we have a knowledge 
of Jesus Christ, whom to know is life eter- 
hal. 

But, brethren, the knowledge of Christ, 



{hough constituting eternal 



rifev is as im- 



perii cf as the knowledge of ourselves: 
Here we know but in part — we see through 
a gfa'ss darkly, — the full display of the 
brightness 6f the Father's glory is not 
adapted to human sense, for no man can 
see God and live It was only by being 
veiled in a' bodf of rfesh, th'a-l the Godhead 
Could become visible to, and acceptable to 
mortal touch: hence, the words of our 
Lord, fl He that hath ieeft me, hath seen 
the Father; and yet the grandeur of Jesus 
cannot be fully comprehended by us, for 
he was without sin. (logged wrth the in- 
firmities and frailties of his people, we may 
follow stumblingly in his footsteps. Our 
longing eyes may trace indistinctly (he 
pathway to glory, which he has marked 
out; but it is reserved for another state of 
being, to see him as he is, and to know 
him as we are known 5 . We have learned 
to admire his wisdom and his righteous- 
ness in the scheme of redemption, where 
nothing is left to human imbecility or to 
blind chance; but all our interests, tempo- 
ral and eternal, are bound up in the sure 
mercies of David, where our own righte- 
ousness is cast aside as a worthless thing, 
and in its stead we have the soul sustaining 
the substantial assurance, that the Lord is 
Our righteousness. Brethren, do we want 
more? Can our hungry souls long for bet- 
ter food? 

Is not the graceof God adapted to eve- 
ry exigency and to all our necessities? 
Certainly it is. And can we desire again 
to be in bondage to the weak and beggar- 



ly elements? No, the knowledge of Christ 
is far superior to earthly paradise. The 
knowledge of Christ is heaven, for where 
Christ is, there is heaven. Now Jesus 
dwells with his church, his bride; he 
reigns in Zion, and if we are his, our nameS 
are written in heaven. He bears our 
names on the palms of his hands, our bo- 
dies are the temples of the Holy Ghost. 
Yes, those vile bodies, though defiled with 
sin, to the dust, are the habitations of the 
spirit of Christ; for if we have not life spi- 
rit of Christ, we are none of his: These 
same bodies, after they have suffered the 
penalty annexed to transgression, when ev- 
ery thing earthly shall have been swallow- 
ed up in the grave, these same corruptible 
bodies shall be raised incorruptible, a'ticf 
fashioned like Onto the body of Christ. 

Here we have but ah imperfect view of 
the glories of that state, like the infant up- 
on whose feeble vision surrounding objects 
make but a slight and transient impression. 
Here it doth not appear what we shall be, 
but we know that when he shall appear, &e 
shall be like him, for we shall see hinias v 
he is. It is by this hope we are saved, sa- 
ved from the allurements and temptations' 
of the world, saved from its follies and Ex- 
travagancies, saved from tho promptings 
of our own deceitful and wicked hearts;* 
and indeed but for this hope, why do we 
encOunfer the scoffs and derision of an' thi- 
godly world? Of what advantage all our 
suffering and patience, if the dead rise 
not? 

But, brethren, be not deceived ; so bright 
a dawn cannot be shrouded in eternal 
night, so blissful an expectation cannot 
terminate in disappointment; for Christ 
has risen from the dead, and as fie is our 
life when he shall appear, then shall we al- 
so appear with him in glory. This cheer- 
ing, this glorious hope, should encourage 
us to endure, with patience, the tribula- 
tions of the way, to render our bodies a liv- 
ing sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, 
which is our reasonable service. 

Finally, brethren, let us remember, lay 



f 



«* ...J 



members as well as minister*, that death 
will soon put a period to our active duties, 
thai in a few short years" the labor's" of the 



will terminate, and we shall be called tfc 
render up an account of our stewardship. 
The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ :W 



young of this body, as well as the aged, with you'all. Amen. 






MINUTES 

&F the Seventeenth annual session of the 

Content tied Baptist Association, 



Held 4T 



Hfctck Creek rti. h. 9 Wayne coiinty, Kf, itfe) 

On Me 22/iof, 23rd, and 24th days of October, 1S41 



FRIDAY, October 22nd. 

1st. Pursuant to adjournment from last 
year, Elder James Griffin preached the 
Introductory Sermon from Acts, 24 c. and 
25 v, "And as he reasoned of righteous- 
ness, temperance, and judgment to come, 
Felix trembled, and answered, go thy 
way for this time; when I have a conve- 
nient season, I will call for thee." 

2nd* The delegates met together, $nd 
the Association was opened with pray- 
er and praise, by brother Ichabod 
Moore. 

3rd. Appointed brother Benjamin By- 
num Moderator, and Ichabod Moore 
Clerk, and Jesse C. Knight Assistant 
Clerk. And brethren John Smith and 
Wright Smith a Committee on Fi- 
nance. 

4thi. Ministers and messengers from sis- 
ter Associations, were invited to take 
seats- with us; when brethren C. B. Has- 
sell, A. B. Baines, Wm. Hyman, John 
Daniel, Blount Cooper, Moses Joyner, 
Danitet Land and Wm. Thigpen, from the 
Kehukee took seats with us, and handed 
in a letter and a file of their Minutes. 
From Little River, Ery Holland, Burwetl 
Temple, Robert N Gurly,a-n-d Need ham 
Whitley, handed in their letter and file ol 
Minutes and took seats with us, From 



White Oak, brethren Amari arid Jabesfl 
Smith, who took seats with us and handed 
in a file of their Minutes, From Country 
line, Wm. Burns and Wm. Benson hand- 
ed in a file of Minutes arid took seats with 
us. From Abbott's Creek Union, some 
brother handed in a file of their Minutes* 
All of the above named brethren were 
gladly received. 

5th. Called for the letters from the dif- 
ferent churches in this Association; and 
entered their contents as appears hi the 
following table. 

6th. Called for petitionary' fetters, 
when one Was handed in from Swift's 
Creek, Craven county, and after ft Was 
read, examination took place; and when 
we found her to be of our order she was 
received into our body; the Moderator 
giving the delegate the right hand of fel- 
lowship. 

7th. Appointed our next Association to ; 
be held with the church at Sandy Bottom, 
Lenoir county, to commence at eleven 
o'clock, oil Saturday before the fouYfh 
Lord's day in October, 1848, and brother 
Tehabod Moore to preach the introductory 
Sermon, and if he fail, brother* John 
Smith. 

8th. Then adjo-urned 
hall after nine o ? clock. 



till to-morrow 



I 



Names of Churches, &ti@ 

counties wfierein 

situated i 




Autrey's Creek, Edgecombe 
Beaver Darn; Lenoir, 
JJIaek Creek, Waync^ 
Friendship, Wayne } 
Hancock's, Pitt, 
Meadow, Greene, 
Memorial, Wuyne\ 
ftah'un.ta$ Wayne, 
Newport Chape], Wayne, 
Pleasant Hill, Edgecombe, 
Pleasant Plains', Wayne, 
Red Banks^ Pith 
jSandy Bottom, Lenoir, 
iS'wir't Creek; Vraven^ 
Ti son's', Pitt, 
Toisnot, Edgecombe, 
Town Creek, Edgecombe, 
llnion, Edgecombe, 
Wiiite Oak, Edgecombe , 



John R. Moore, 
Not represented. 

Wm Bass, Linsy Bell, Abraham Lamb, 
JacohHerrinof, Benj Herring,* R. Parker, 
John Smith, Win Mom ford, B. Bland, 
Ben] Bynum, Wig Williams, W .Tones, 
Woodard Holland, W Hooks, W Bass, 
John Smith, Sbadrach Pate, J Gardner, 
Sanders P Cox,* Wm Rouse, J B Green, 
Jacob Proctor,* Fred Proctor, R Gay,* 
W right Smith, 

.Tarries GrifBn, Josia Mefson, M Tison, 
J R Croom, k W Wodten, KvansWhaly,* 
L Wayne-,' N Whitford, H Willie, 
Benjamin Briley, Benjamin Corey,* 
Larry Dew, William Munford, 
Moses Baker, Jesse C Knight, T Bynum, 
J A Armstrong,* N Taylor, ETzy Taylor, 
lchabod Moore, W M Stanton,.) BWoodard, 
* Absent. 



it 








5 




2" Q 
5' b" 


1 




St, 




j" 






5 T° 

$Cts 


1 
i 


- 






I 
1 


I 


3i i oo 

2V 1 25 
13 75 


8 






1 


1 


1 


28 i b(JF 

28 i 00 
M, 75 


i 






,. 


2 




68 i oo 
45, 1 Otf 
12 50 














8 


30 


l 




1 




1 


5 

16 

2 


53 
17 
18 
13 
21 
GO 


I 00 

1 oo 
1 oo 

75 
1 00 
1 50 






1 


I 


1 


1 


37 

27 


1 OO 
] 00 









_ 


. 




• 




10 




i 


1 


4 


27 


522 


16 80 



SATURDAY, October 23rd. 

9th. Met pursuant to adjournment 
from yesterday; and the Association was 
opened with' prayer and praise by Elder 
€. B. HaSSeB. ' 

idth. Called the roil and noted the ab- 
sentees thus*. 

llth. The committee on finance report: 
balance in hand last year, --$[2 50 

'Contributions this year 16 80 



Paid Ichabod Moore for tran- 
scribing, superintending and 
distributing last year's Min- 
utes, $6 od 

Paid for printing last year's 

Minutes, 12 00 



29 30 



IS 00 



Balance in the hands of the Trea y r y $11 30 
Paid for printing this year's 

Minutes $8 00 

Paid for printing letter, 5 OO 

12th. Appointed messengers to sister 
Associations; to Kehukee, brethren J. C. 
Knight, Shadrack Pate, Moses Baker, John 
Smith, James Griffin, I. Moore, Wm. 
MomfoH, J. Nelson, C. Taylor. B. Briley 
and Wm, Bass. To Little River, J. Her- 
ring, Josiah Gardner, Wm. Bass, John 
Smith, Woodird Holland, S< Pate, and 
Wm, Rouse. To White Oak, Benjamin 



Bynum, James Griffin, Wright Smith and 
John Smith. To Country Line and Ab- 
bott's Creek, Benjamin Bynum arid J. R„ 
Croom. 

13th. Appointed ministers W preach oil 
Sunday: Brethren C. B. tfassell, Burvvelf 
Temple and Wm. Hymarc. 

14th. Appointed a committee of three, 
viz: Jacob Herring, J. R. Croom, and Al- 
len W.Wooten to visit the church at Beav- 
er Dam, Lenoir county; and know of her if 
she will receive a committee of seven, 
consisting of brethren, Ichabod Moore, 
John Smith, J. C. Knighty James Griffiin, 
Moses Baker, Wright Smith and Josiah 
Gardner, for the purpose of enquiring into 
the trtttit df some reports which have beeri 
published against her pastor, and aid in 
settling the matter, and if so, what day she 
will receive the committee of seven; and 
the committee of three to let the commit- 
tee of seven know the time when to at- 
tend, and th^t all the parties have power if 
received to bring in evidence, and report 
to the Association next year. 

15th. Appointed the Friday before the 
third Sunday in November next, a day of 
fasting and prayer, (for the purpose,) that 
the Lord would grant us another revival 
of religion and send forth 1 more faithful' 



laborers Into his vineyard, &c. 

IG.lh. Published in these Minutes the 
times and places when and- where our sis- 
ter Associations hold their meetings. 

1st The next session of the Kehukee, 
is to he hekl at Great Swamp, 4 miles 
north of Greenville, Pitt county, to com- 
mence Saturday before the 1st Sunday in 
October, 1848. 

2nd. Little River Association, is to be 
held at Pleasant Spring, 8 miles south of 
lialeigh, to commence on Friday before 
the last Sunday in September. 

3rd. White Oak, is to be held at Hadnot's 
Creek, 30 miles south of Newborn, to. 
sommence on Saturday before the 3rd 
Sunday in October. 

4th. Country Line is to be held in Cas- 
well county, some 30 or 40 miles north of 
Hillsbo.ro'; the place where Abbott's 
Creek Union is to be held not recollected. 
But we think some thirty miles south of 
Jamestown. 

1 7th. Appointed Ichabod Moore our 
Treasurer, and to transcribe and superin- 
tend the printing of these Minutes; and 
have 450 copies printed and distribute 
them as usual. 

18th. The Minutes were then read and 
assigned by the Moderator and Clerk, and 
adjourned to time arid place above named. 
BENJAMIN BYNUM, Mod'r. 
ICHABOD MOORE, Cl'k. 

Sabbath, October the 24th., met at the 
gtage at 10 o'clock, when brother William 
II y man opened the worship of the day 
from the gospel by John, 15 c. 1st, 2nd and 
3rd. "I am the true vine, and my Fath- 
er is the husbandman; every branch in 
me that beareth not fruit, he taketh away; 
and every branch that beareth fruit, he 
pufgeth it, that, it may bring forth the 
more fruit." Brother C. B. Hassell follow-? 
ed and preached from 2nd Timothy, 2 c. 



the word preached by his servants through 
the round of our meeting, and join with 
us in prayer that it may prove a blessing 
for Christ's sake. Amen,. 

LETTER. 
Pleasant Grove, Pill county, N. C. ) 
November 13M, 1847. £ 
The Contentnea Association having no 
Circular Letter, the writer of the follow- 
ing letter being specially requested to pub- 
lish it, hopes \% wi;il b,e nothing amiss to 
print this with the Minutes out o/ his o,wn, 
means; not as the letter of the Asso^ta-p- 
tion, but his own. 

Ueloved brethren., under the auspices of 
a benign Providence, we have the privi- 
lege of addressing you by way of a letter. 
Oiving to the great number that have been 
written upon various, subjects, wg have 
been somewhat difficulted in making our 
choice, upon a matter of so m-ueh impor- 
tance; but as we do not recollect seeing 
one written upon the goodness of God t we 
prefer that subject to any before us at pre- 
sent 

1st. To deny the existence of God, 
would place any reader under the charac- 
ter represented oy the Psalmist : ; The foot 
said in his Heart, there is no God. Hut as 
none of you deny him, we will not remark 
upon that part of the subject. One of the 
titles or names by which he is called, ia 
good. Thou, Lord, art good. The Lord 
is good to all* and his tender mercies are 
over all. 1st His goodness is portrayed 
in the works of creation. U we look to 
the heavens, they are the workmanship of 
his hand, and they are good; look lo the 
planetary worlds and behold, his goodness 
in creating ihem, and fixing them upon 
their orbits, as so many diamonds to set 
forth his glory, wisdom, and power, and 
to call our attention to their unvarying and 



and 19. "Nevertheless the foundation of , steady course; for none of them violate 



God standeth sure, having this seal, the 
Lord knoweth them that are his," &o. 

A large, well behaved, and respectable 
portion of the community, heard the word 
preached, and we hope the Lord blessed 



the laws of nature, or the command which 
he has given them When we look upon 
the sun, we see the goodness and glory of 
God, for without it the world would be of 
no use to nyin, but would be in a state of 



desperation and darkness, not producing 
vegetation or bringing forth her fruits for 
the benefit of man. But the sun resembles 
his creator in divers ways; there are thr< e 
component parts in him, the ligh ', the 
matter, and the heat; and if either of these 
were removed, he would he incomplete 



might have wandered in eternal obscurity 
wiihout learning any more of God's good- 
ness; but might have experienced his 
Wrath and indignation, without the least 
particle of his goodness. 

Hut brethren, behold what manner of 
love the Father hath bestowed upon us, 



and could not be a sun, and therefore that we might be called the sons of God: 

would not set forth the goodness of God, for before man fell or Adam's dus was 

which he has been pleased t) make known fashioned to a man, the Lord in bis good- 

to me by exhibiting himself in a trinity of ness and on rev had devised a plan to save 

persons. There are three that bare r^c- him, and had laid help upon one that was 

ord in heaven, the Father, the Word, and mighty to save; for when he saw there 

the Holy Ghost; and these three are one. was none to help, Christ interposed and 

So you see if it were possible to takeaway b< came surety for his people to pay the 

from the sun, the light, the matter, or the debt, which they owed, that as sin hath 

heat, there would be no sun. Even so if reigned unto death, even so might grace 
the Father, Son, or Word, could be remo- ; reign through righteousness unto eter- 

ved, no God; since these three are one, nal life; by our Lord Je.-us Christ. Veri- 

and without which he never could have lv, the goodness of God is not only known 

made himself known to the sons of men in in creation, but also in preservation, by 



the pardon of sins. 



the care he takes over the fishes of the sea, 



God is good in all his works, in creating beasts of the field and fowls of the air; but 
the beasts of the field, the fishes of the sea, for him they could not have nir to breathe 
and the fowls of the air; and last of all, in, and if they had they could not exi<t 
man in his own image, for to govern the without him. For notwithstanding the 
rest of his works. Also he placed him in great variet) of insects and animals in all 
a happy and peaceful station giving him creation. God has provided food for them 
the pre-eminence over all but the tree of all, and none of them fall without his 10- 
Jife. Here was the creation of God com- tice; he is perfectly acquainted with all 
plete, and much of his goodness and pow- land every part of his work. 
er known; but from the scriptures, or any I Hut the goodness of God is more abun- 
thing we can learn, he was not made dantly made known to the creature man; 
known to Adam in a trinity of persons, first, his universal goodness to all, and sec 
while he occupied this happy state, nor do ondly his special goodness to his people, 
we see why he should be, while in this 1st. His universal goodness extends to 
perfect or happy state; for he was in pos- every man, woman, and child, living on 
session of enough of the goodness of God, either quarter of the globe. This is clear 
for the time then being. But we do not from St. Paul's remarks to the heathen at 
understand he (man) stayed in this blessed ; Athens; for saith he, in him (God,) we 
and happy place very long, and although j live, move, and have our continual being. 



he was made good and happy and pro- 



viso every good and perfect gift comes 



nounced so by his Creator, he, through an down from the Father of lights, with whom 
act of his disobedience, forfeited his station j lllere ' s n0 shadow of turning. If he find 
and exposed himself with his posterity, to I man a f )lace ,0 tlwe " u P on ' li is owing to 
the judgments of God, from under which, 1 nis goodness; or if he* clothes him in any 
he had not power to emancipate himself; or ,n all countries, or when he established 



and but for the goodness of God, might 
kave been left to his own sad fate, and 



the clouds, or takes the water of the sea 
and spreads it over the earth, or sends any 



national blessing upon any people, as to 
grant them plenty or an abundant halves', 
or defends their coasts from invasions, 
either foreign or domestic; or confers upon 
any people sciences or arts, honors, wealth, 
happiness, or no mailer what good thing; 
it may be; it shows that people his univer- 
sal goodness, as all are part